ATA 49th Annual Conference

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Sessions by Specialization


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  ATA Activities
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ATA-1 Opening Session
Jiri Stejskal and Nicholas Hartmann
(Thursday, 8:30-9:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Start the conference off right by attending the Opening Session!

ATA-2 Presentation of Candidates and Election
Jiri Stejskal
(Thursday, 9:30-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Hear the candidates for ATA's Board of Directors voice their opinions and then make them hear yours by exercising the right to vote. You must be an Active or Corresponding member of ATA to vote.

ATA-3 Orientation for First-time Conference Attendees
Amanda B. Ennis and Jill R. Sommer
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

If you are a first-time attendee, the official program may seem overwhelming and somewhat confusing. The presentation will outline a few strategies to help make the most of your experience in Orlando. Learn to choose between equally appealing sessions; how to read the map and navigate crowded hallways; why the colored dots are important; which gatherings are invitation-only and which are open to all; the best times to tour the exhibits; strategies for using the Job Marketplace room; and other practical information. Preconference tip: make sure you attend the Wednesday night Opening Reception, and do wear your colored dot(s)!

ATA-4 Tomorrow's Translator
Donald Barabé
(Thursday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Having been through modernization before modernity, humanity is now fully engaged in the global era, and internationalization is a fact of life. Along the way, this has provoked major economical, political, and social upheavals—and still does. Hence, companies have had to learn to adapt. However, cultural and linguistic diversity in the world is increasingly perceived as a barrier to trade and knowledge. The translation profession is an integral part of these exchanges and lies at the heart of globalization. This session will examine the trends influencing the translation profession and paint a vibrant and realistic portrait of tomorrow's translator.

ATA-5 Mentor/Mentee Orientation and Debriefing Session
Courtney Searls-Ridge
(Thursday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session is a requirement for anyone wanting to participate in ATA's Mentoring Program as a mentor or a mentee. Potential mentors and mentees will find out how the program works and how to match themselves with each other. They will come away with guidelines for structuring the mentor/mentee relationship and tips for optimizing the relationship to benefit everyone involved. Current and former mentors and mentees are encouraged to attend and to share their experiences. Participation in the program over the course of one year earns one ATA Continuing Education Point. There is no charge to attend this event, but participants must pre-register. See the Conference Registration Form.

ATA-6 Annual Meeting of All Members
Jiri Stejskal
(Friday, 9:00-10:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Find out what your association has accomplished and the goals that are being set. Members of the audience will be given an opportunity to ask questions and make comments to ATA Board members and committee chairs.

ATA-7 Preparing to Take the ATA Certification Exam: Questions and Answers
Jutta Diel-Dominique
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This forum will be of interest to ATA members who seek a better understanding of ATA's Certification Program. The presenters will respond to questions from the audience about certification policies and procedures.

ATA-8 ATA Ethics and Business Practices Workshop
Courtney Searls-Ridge
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

While codes of ethics sometimes appear dry and boring as written, applying them in real life can create interesting and juicy dilemmas. We will examine how ATA's Code of Professional Conduct and Business Practices applies to real-life situations while we look at some of the gray areas of professional conduct in translation and interpreting. ATA members are invited to submit real-life ethical conundrums for discussion to courtney@germanlanguageservices.com by October 1, 2008. This workshop fulfills the ethics requirement for maintaining ATA certification.

ATA-9 How to Recharge Your Local Chapter or Regional Group
Caitilin Walsh
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

ATA chapters and other regional groups serve an important function for translators and interpreters. They provide opportunities for networking, continuing education, mentoring, and socializing. However, many groups suffer from a lack of activities and active volunteers, while some other groups have been able to maintain and develop very active programs. This panel discussion will bring together representatives from various active groups to share their experience and knowledge with everyone involved in the administration of regional groups. Those who would like to become active in their local groups or start a group of their own are invited to attend.

ATA-10 Grader Recruitment for ATA's Certification Program
Jutta Diel-Dominique
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The ATA Certification Program is always looking to refresh its grading pool. If you are ATA-certified and have the time to devote to furthering the goals of the program, you might be a good candidate to join one of our grader workgroups. Come learn more about the responsibilities and benefits of being a part of this group of professionals.

ATA-11 NEW SESSION Certification Exam Software Demonstration
Alan K. Melby
(Friday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The project to allow ATA's certification exam to be taken using a computer keyboard rather than pencil and paper has entered a new phase. The software that has made this project possible is now complete and is currently being tested. When the software is deemed ready, an exam sitting will be scheduled. A demonstration of this new and improved software will be given during this presentation. Questions will also be taken from the audience.

 
ATA Activities

Related Sessions

A-1 Building the Momentum to Establish ATA's First English into Arabic Certification Exam, Part I

A-2 Building the Momentum to Establish ATA's First English into Arabic Certification Exam, Part II

C-3 Chinese Language Division Annual Meeting

F-7 French Language Division Annual Meeting

G-5 German Language Division Annual Meeting

I-3 Interpreters Division Annual Meeting

IT-1 Italian Language Division Annual Meeting

J-3 Japanese<>English Certification Workshop

J-8 Japanese Language Division Annual Meeting

K-4 Korean Language Division Annual Meeting

LSP-2 Translation Company Division Annual Meeting

LT-6 Language Technology Division Annual Meeting

L-9 Literary Division Annual Meeting

MED-1 National Coalition on Health Care Interpreter Certification: A Progress Report

MED-3 Medical Division Annual Meeting

N-2 Nordic Division Annual Meeting

P-3 Portuguese Language Division Annual Meeting

SL-9 Slavic Languages Division Annual Meeting

S-5 Spanish Language Division Annual Meeting

TP-2 ATA Research Forum, Part I: Young Bilinguals as a Language Resource and as Language Brokers

TP-3 ATA Research Forum, Part II: Research, Huh? What's in it for Translators, Interpreters, and Educators?

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  Financial Translation
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FIN-1 Current Issues Regarding International Financial Reporting Standards and Their Translation into German by the European Union
Michael J. Engley
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

With few exceptions, companies listed on a regulated European market were required to adopt International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as of 2005. This presentation will begin with a review of basic German>English terminology and examine the progress of convergence between IFRSs and U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. It will also address important changes in the standards as approved by the International Accounting Standards Board for 2008. Translation issues regarding how these standards have been translated into German and approved by the European Union, as well as how they are applied in the "real world" by German companies, will be covered.

FIN-2 CANCELLED Emerging Topics in Financial Translation
Javier Gil
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

FIN-3 NEW SESSION Translating the Stock Market
Silvana Teresa Debonis
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Financial translators need to master terminology and expressions used in the stock market industry to be able to convey meaning accurately into their target language. This presentation will analyze terminology commonly used by fundamental and technical analysts and address its meaning in context. Terms such as bottom-up, top-down, contrarian, breakout, above or below the trend, and many others will be explained in context.

FIN-4 NEW SESSION Understanding Financial Crisis Terminology
Silvana Teresa Debonis
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Crises have their own characteristics and create their own language, which financial translators are expected to convey properly in their target language. This presentation will explain the meaning of words such as real estate bubble, write-downs, write-offs, packaged loans, credit crunch, deleveraging, and LBO finance as they relate to the current global financial crisis.

 
Financial Translation

Related Sessions

SEM-F Commercial Banking Translation Survey

SEM-M Translating for the Asset Management Industry

G-1 What is a Societas Europaea and Why are Companies Establishing this Truly European Type of Company?

J-5 Japanese<>English Financial Translation and Interpreting: Shoring up the Bottom Line

P-7 Translating the Professors: The Brazilian Edition of the Harvard Business Review

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  Independent Contractors
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IC-1 The National Language Service Corps
William P. Rivers
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The National Language Service Corps (NLSC) is a group of individuals united by the belief that language has a tremendous impact on who we are, who we can be, and what we can do together. The NLSC offers individuals with language expertise the opportunity to support local, state, and federal government efforts in times of crisis. The NLSC will maintain a civilian corps in the languages determined to be important to the security and welfare of the nation. This presentation will explain the pilot NLSC program and discuss opportunities for ATA members in the NLSC.

IC-2 How to Successfully Market Yourself to Translation Companies
George Rimalower
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Agencies use hundreds of translators. Unless you stand out from the crowd, you may be overlooked. Solid translation skills are no longer all that it takes to be a successful translator. This session will explore how to enhance your standing with translation companies. Translators attending this session will learn how they can become the kind of translators agencies prefer to work with. Discussions will address the best ways to approach a prospective agency and how to "sell" your services.

IC-3 CANCELLED Tips and Techniques for Getting Media Coverage in Your Local Area
Wendy Greenwald
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

IC-4 Business Basics for Everyone
Jonathan T. Hine
(Thursday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translators and interpreters are in business. Pricing and monitoring financial performance are crucial to business success. This presentation will cover the elements of budgeting and business planning using easy-to-follow examples. Participants will learn a methodology to help them develop personal criteria for accepting or rejecting freelance assignments, balancing employment offers, and choosing alternatives for business expansion. The presentation will cover calculating the break-even price and tracking sales volume and revenue. New material will be included on evaluating life-changing moves, selling quality to clients, building operating reserves, and surviving the business cycle.

IC-5 Building a Clientele of Direct Clients
Christine Durban
(Thursday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Working for direct clients is both intellectually satisfying and financially rewarding, but how do you find them and get them on your client roster? This seminar will briefly examine how inertia, a lack of information, and a poverty-cult mentality can sap energy and undermine otherwise promising careers. Using concrete examples, the speaker will give a step-by-step demonstration on how a proactive approach can pay off. Participants will also receive concrete strategies for building a successful practice based on direct clients.

IC-6 Resolving Commercial Conflicts
Dorothee Racette
(Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The differing concerns and perspectives of freelancer translators, agency owners, and end clients inevitably lead to occasional business conflicts. This presentation will explore proven methods to successfully address and resolve commercial conflicts arising from scenarios such as nonpayment, quality complaints, or noncompliance with contract terms. While it may require some creativity, the effective resolution of such conflicts can enhance your professional reputation and ultimately your marketability. Participants will be encouraged to share commercial conflict scenarios of their own for discussion.

IC-7 CANCELLED Tips and Techniques for Getting Media Coverage in Your Local Area
Wendy Greenwald
(Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

IC-8 Editing Translations: Revision for Freelancers
Jonathan T. Hine
(Friday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Every professional translation deserves to be checked by a second translator before delivery. This is called revision, but its purpose is not to revise the translation. Only an experienced translator can do this job, but many translators will not take revision assignments. Teachers or certification exam graders may seem suited to the work, but professional revision is not the same as grading papers or exams. The speaker will define revision and contrast it with activities that look like it but are not. The presentation will include pointers on how to approach the revision task and how to price it.

IC-9 Accounting 101 for Freelancers: Keeping the Books Straight and the IRS and Your Accountant Happy
Ted R. Wozniak
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

This presentation will provide an introduction to basic bookkeeping and accounting requirements from the specific perspective of the freelance translator/interpreter. Topics will include: general bookkeeping principles; accounting records (e.g., accounts receivable); invoicing; financial statement preparation; transactions in foreign currencies; and a brief overview of tax requirements. The use of standard office software programs will be emphasized for recordkeeping and financial records preparation. No prior knowledge of bookkeeping or accounting is required.

IC-10 How to Find Work and Stay in Business
Clarissa Surek-Clark
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Are you struggling to get your foot in the door as a translator? Are you trying to expand your business either with more work from existing clients or by finding new ones? Whether you are beginning in the profession or you are someone in need of reinventing him/herself as a seasoned translator, this presentation will provide practical tips on how to market yourself in the translation industry.

IC-11 Business Practices Discussion Panel
Gabe Bokor, Eric Bullington, Joseph P. Mazza, Anne Vincent, and Ed Zad
(Saturday, 9:00-10:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

A panel of freelance translators, bureau owners, and non-bureau translation buyers will discuss common issues that arise between vendors and buyers of translations. Topics will include preventing and remedying problems.

IC-12 Getting Through the Negotiation Without Breaking a Sweat!
Jorge Ungo
(Saturday, 9:00-10:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Nobody likes to hear ultimatums, but most people try to avoid negotiation at all costs. If you want to have a relationship with the person on the other end of the phone, you will have to take the first step. In this presentation, you will learn the fundamental elements of negotiation, including how to employ a more flexible, less frustrating approach. The speaker will also teach you how to meet in the middle, how to barter and keep your coordinator on your side, and how to make the entire negotiation "dance" less stressful. Participants will walk away with a fresh outlook and a new, positive approach to negotiations.

IC-13 Translating for the Federal Government: Challenges and Opportunities
Harry Kwon and Leslie R. Quiroz
(Saturday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Many federal government agencies, including the Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control, are translating their materials into different languages. Most federal agencies include Spanish versions of their publications, websites, public service announcements, and other materials. The challenge for the translator is how to: 1) encourage clients to expand their resources and make them available in other languages; 2) help agencies understand the translation process; 3) get clients to approve (clear) translated materials; and 4) deliver a top-quality product that will make the client and the translator look good.

IC-14 NEW TITLE Accentuate the Positive: Making Your Résumé Sing
Jorge Ungo
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Customizing your résumé for language services companies and agencies can be challenging. How much information is too much and how much is not enough? This hands-on presentation will walk interpreters through all levels of the process to create a résumé targeted to language services companies. Tips for contacting and following up with recruiters, as well as additional ideas for using business cards, the Internet, and other tools to boost exposure and marketability will be included.

IC-15 Translator Turned Interpreter: Pitfalls, Benefits, and Team Interpreting Advantages
Thelma D. Gomez-Ferry and Francesca Samuel
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session will include an audiovisual presentation about situations that interpreters can face in legal/judicial, medical, telephone, and conference settings. We will also provide information for translators who are interested in the interpreting field. We will present different interpreting techniques, modes of interpreting, and tips to help translators make a more confident transition into this profession. The interactive section of this presentation will also focus on the advantages of team interpreting as a quality control mechanism. Team interpreting encourages cooperation and shared responsibility to prevent premature exhaustion and fatigue while preserving the accuracy of the interpreting process. Glossaries and handouts will be provided.

IC-16 Social Networking: How to Practice One of the Most Effective Marketing Tools Today
Orestes Martinez
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

It is time for translators and interpreters to start making proper use of one of the most effective marketing tools at their disposal: social networking. Learn about the typical networking complaints and how to avoid them, as well as the top 10 requirements for successful networking. Real-life networking experiences at the Orlando Convention and Visitors Bureau will be used as examples.

IC-17 NEW SESSION Growing Your Practice with ATA's New Client Outreach Kit
Lillian S. Clementi and Christine Durban
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Positioning yourself as a resource for translation consumers is a highly effective way to win new clients and move up-market. But where do you start? Over the past year, ATA's Public Relations Committee has begun to develop a client outreach kit that will equip ATA members with practical tools for speaking to business groups. Centered around a core presentation based on ATA's public relations message, the kit will ultimately include guidelines on public speaking, tips for getting invitations, and more. Attend this session for client outreach pointers, a sneak preview of the kit, and a chance to provide comments.

IC-18 NEW SESSION Ensuring Payment: Before, During, and After the Project
Ted R. Wozniak
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Late and non-payments are a fact of life in all businesses. The Internet and the rise of translator "auction" portals, while increasing the translator's exposure to the global market, have unfortunately also made it easier for unscrupulous people to delay payment or even intentionally defraud freelancers. This presentation will cover steps that all translators can and should take to minimize the risk of not being paid for their services. Topics will include actions to take before, during, and after the project, standard business practices regarding accounts payable, and resources for checking a company's bone fides, dunning, and collection procedures.

 
Independent Contractors

Related Sessions

SEM-C Marketing Without Borders

SEM-D How to Succeed as a Freelance Translator

SEM-J How to Get the Most Out of Your Computer: Tips for Small Business Owners

SEM-K Making the Most of Your Freelance Translation and Interpreting Business

ATA-8 ATA Ethics and Business Practices Workshop

G-2 Taking Control of Your Time: If Not Now, When? Part I

G-3 Taking Control of Your Time: If Not Now, When? Part II

G-4 Attracting Clients from Germany: Approaches for Independent U.S.-based Translators

K-6 Beginning a Career as a Korean Interpreter and Translator

LSP-4 Working with the U.S. Government: Information Resources

LSP-7 Applied Anthropology in Freelancer and Vendor Management

LT-1 Blogging: How and Why

LT-10 Simplified Technical English: Cost Savings and Quality Assurance for Translations

SL-7 Ask the Experts: Advice for Novice (and Not So Novice) Interpreters

TERM-1 Overcoming Termbase Trepidation: A Guide to Building a Better Termbase for the Harried Translator or Project Manager

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  Interpreting
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

I-1 Screening of the Documentary The Whisperers
Marilda W. Averbug and Barry S. Olsen
(Thursday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English, French, and German)

The Whisperers seeks to reveal the essential qualities that conference interpreters possess, and to portray the day-to-day working life of interpreters by approaching the subject from various angles. This documentary shows how the profession has evolved in all its diversity, describes the challenges facing it, and illustrates why it is—despite its public invisibility—at the very heart of international communication. This film is a must see for anyone with an interest in conference interpreting.

I-2 The Pitfalls of Long Consecutive in the Courtroom: Learning When to Use It and When Not to
Janis Palma
(Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

This presentation will explore the different discursive styles interpreters encounter on the witness stand. An analysis of each style will help the interpreter decide whether the long consecutive mode is appropriate and how to use it effectively. The presenter will also examine how the short consecutive mode can best be used to minimize disruptions to the natural flow of witness testimony.

I-3 Interpreters Division Annual Meeting
Armando Ezquerra Hasbun
(Friday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Interpreters Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other interpreters. We will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2009. All division members are encouraged to attend, and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.

I-4 NEW TITLE A Health Care Interpreter’s Best Friend: The National Code of Ethics for Interpreters in Health Care
Jorge Ungo
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The National Council on Interpreting in Health Care (NCIHC) is a multidisciplinary organization that promotes culturally competent professional health care interpreting as a means to support equal access to health care for individuals with limited English proficiency. This presentation will give an overview of the development process as well as an in-depth look at the National Code of Ethics developed by NCIHC. Attendees will participate in a discussion on how to apply the Code of Ethics to specific situations through case-based scenarios.

I-5 Promoting Interpreter Health and Well-being
Susan Choi and Sally Jue
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Every day, health care interpreters are exposed to sensitive issues, including severe illness, abuse, and death, which can lead to burnout and depression. Peer-to-peer support is a strategy that can be used to help alleviate job-related stress. Within this forum, professionals can discuss complex cases, ethical dilemmas, client dependency, and offer suggestions. This presentation will examine the importance of peer-to-peer support and provide strategies on how interpreters can promote their overall well-being and professional growth.

I-6 Simultaneous Court Interpreting Techniques
María Cecilia Marty
(Saturday, 9:00-10:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The speaker will cover a variety of subjects, including agility, diction, condensing, self-monitoring, attention splitting, triple-tasking, and décalage. This presentation will be especially valuable for those who are preparing to take the federal oral exam.

I-7 From Heritage Speaker to Professional Interpreter
Marta Zielyk
(Saturday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will discuss the challenges, problems, and pitfalls faced by heritage speakers who transition to professional level language expertise.

I-8 Assessing Simultaneous Interpreting: A Researcher's Perspective
Elisabet Tiselius
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

The assessment of simultaneous interpreters is a frequently debated topic, and one of daily importance to interpreters, who are constantly assessed by customers, conference organizers, and peers. The quality of the product and assessment are closely linked. Assessing simultaneous interpreting from a researcher's perspective allows the researcher to study the interpretation from many different angles in order to determine a qualitative level.

I-9 NEW SESSION Ethics, Advocacy, and the Roles of the Court Interpreter
Erik Camayd-Freixas
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

After interpreting the federal court hearings following the Postville, Iowa immigration raid on May 12-22, 2008, the presenter decided to report violations of due process and constitutional rights he witnessed in the mass prosecution of migrant workers. His unprecedented decision shed new light on the complex role of the interpreter as officer of the court, expert witness, and citizen, and the interdependence of ethics, advocacy, and justice. Publicly for the first time, the presenter discusses his ethical reasoning and careful method for bringing irregularities out for public scrutiny. This presentation will be followed by open discussion.

 
Interpreting

Related Sessions

SEM-I Traps and Challenges of Spanish-language Dialectal Speech: An Interpreter's Nightmare

IC-12 Getting Through the Negotiation Without Breaking a Sweat!

IC-14 Accentuate the Positive: Making Your Résumé Sing

IC-15 Translator Turned Interpreter: Pitfalls, Benefits, and Team Interpreting Advantages

J-7 Medical Interpreting: Navigating the U.S. Health Care System for Japanese Patients

J-9 Deposition Interpreting Workshop

K-6 Beginning a Career as a Korean Interpreter and Translator

LAW-3 From Asylum Interviews to Courtroom Interpreting

LAW-4 Walking Out Free: The Pivotal Role of an Interpreter within a Capital Murder Case

MED-1 National Coalition on Health Care Interpreter Certification: A Progress Report

MED-2 A Collaborative Approach to Interpreting the Mental Status Exam

MED-4 Stress Management for Medical Interpreters

MED-10 The Challenge of Interpreting in a Pediatric Facility

SL-7 Ask the Experts: Advice for Novice (and Not So Novice) Interpreters

TP-5 Strategies and Techniques for Interpreter Training

TP-11 Giving Quality Feedback in Interpreter Training

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  Language Services Providers
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LSP-1 McElroy Translation Tells All: Lessons Learned in 40 Years of Translation Services
Kim Vitray
(Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The vice-president of operations at McElroy Translation will provide an informative glimpse into the 40-year-old company. She will discuss what must be done in order to be a successful, stable, and independent player in the translation industry.

LSP-2 Translation Company Division Annual Meeting
Kim Vitray
(Friday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Translation Company Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other translators and interpreters. We will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2009. All division members are encouraged to attend, and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.

LSP-3 Collaborative Translation
Renato S. Beninatto
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

It is all about collaboration. Traditional concepts about process in translation need to be challenged. The speaker will share stories on how companies are using collaboration tools and management processes to tackle large projects in multiple languages. What does this mean for language service providers and translators?

LSP-4 Working with the U.S. Government: Information Resources
Jennifer DeCamp
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will outline the many ways that translation and translation tool companies can contact the U.S. government, provide information about their services, and obtain contracts. Topics will include websites, the benefits and procedures for providing information about services and products on the Government Services Administration Schedule, and a wide range of other information tools and announcements. This presentation will be relevant to providers of language services and to providers of translation tools.

LSP-5 Manage Like a Pro: Translation Management
Dierk Seeburg
(Saturday, 9:00-10:30am; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

Tomorrow's language service providers must prepare today to master the challenges of a changing localization marketplace. Localization managers are expected to minimize administration, integrate workflows to accelerate projects, and get the product to market while simultaneously improving the overall quality of the translation. Are you wondering how to implement best practices such as automatic document management, reliable metrics measurement, visualization of quality, and remote coordination in order to remain successful? Come and explore topics like establishing translation and localization workflows, cost accounting, generating quotes, and determining profit and loss for projects and customers while controlling operations independent of location.

LSP-6 The Life Cycle of a Translation: A Translation Company's Perspective
George Rimalower
(Saturday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

From inception to delivery, the translation process involves multiple steps and the participation of numerous linguists and experts to create an accurate, linguistically correct and culturally appropriate translation. The speaker will discuss the steps that reputable language services companies take in order to ensure the integrity of a translation project. Attendees will learn the responsibilities of project managers, translators, editors, proofreaders, managers of computer-assisted translation tools, desktop publishers, and experts involved in bringing a project to fruition. Participants will come away with a greater understanding of their respective roles and with ideas that will foster better communication and opportunities in the process.

LSP-7 Applied Anthropology in Freelancer and Vendor Management
Garry X. Guan
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Language and culture are intricately related and have a profound influence on one another. Translation companies tend to overlook the fact that almost all translators are also constrained and affected by their culture. Project managers who are sensitive to this when working with freelancers and vendors from different cultures will ensure a smoother collaboration.

LSP-8 NEW SESSION More Reasons Why Quality Doesn't Matter
Renato S. Beninatto
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The presenter will share his thoughts on how traditional approaches to translation need to be challenged in view of cultural, technological, and economic developments. He will present arguments that language services providers can use to increase their sales other than the one they all use: Quality.

 
Language Services Providers

Related Sessions

ATA-8 ATA Ethics and Business Practices Workshop

LT-10 Simplified Technical English: Cost Savings and Quality Assurance for Translations

TERM-1 Overcoming Termbase Trepidation: A Guide to Building a Better Termbase for the Harried Translator or Project Manager

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  Language Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LT-1 Blogging: How and Why
Corinne L. McKay
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Blogs, or Web logs, have progressed from their origins as online journals into useful information gathering and sharing tools for freelance translators and translation companies alike. We will examine how to find blogs to read and comment on, as well as how to set up and write your own blog and use it as a marketing tool for your business. We will look at various blog hosting services and talk about what to write about once your blog is launched. Examples from popular translation industry blogs will be used.

LT-2 Translation Support Tools Forum, Part I: Focus on Individual Translators
Alan K. Melby
(Thursday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This forum will provide an overview of translation technology and brief presentations by conference exhibitors that offer tools for individual translators. A handout will be available that includes a set of frequently asked questions—compiled by ATA's Translation and Computers Committee—with answers provided by each participating exhibitor. In this one session, attendees can get up-to-date information on a variety of tools and decide which exhibits to visit for more information.

LT-3 Translation Support Tools Forum, Part II: Focus on Translation Companies
Alan K. Melby
(Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This forum will be similar in format to session LT-2; however, the focus will be on tools for translation companies. Company owners and project managers will become aware of what is currently available in the area of translation management software and will be invited to visit the exhibit area for more information. Individual translators are, of course, welcome at this session about software in support of teamwork.

LT-4 Free and Open Source Software for Translators
Dierk Seeburg
(Friday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Free and open source software (FOSS) such as Firefox, OmegaT, OpenOffice.org, and the Linux operating system have become an essential part of the translator's software toolbox. The reasons are obvious: FOSS is secure, functional, and reliable, and allows translators to work productively without worrying about high costs and licensing constraints. Would you like pointers on how to use a free integrated translation environment, translation project management, or machine translation tool? Find out how you can get started integrating a full suite of FOSS programs into your current computing environment.

LT-5 How to Keep Your PC in Tip-top Shape
Carey Holzman
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Preventive Windows maintenance can take just a few minutes, costs nothing, and helps ensure a computer's reliability. This session will help computer users keep their PCs running smoothly. What is malware (spyware and adware)? Which anti-virus product is the best? How can you save money and make your computer more efficient by using free utilities? This speaker will also discuss drivers, updates, and upgrades.

LT-6 Language Technology Division Annual Meeting
Dierk Seeburg
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Language Technology Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other translators and interpreters. We will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2009. All division members are encouraged to attend, and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.

LT-7 CANCELLED Noob No More: Making the Most of Internet Resources in Translation
Megan G. Lehmann and Eugenia A. Tumanova
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English with Russian examples)

LT-8 Translation Technology's Ring of Power: One Tool to Rule Them All . . . and in the Darkness Bind Them?
Jost O. Zetzsche
NEW TIME (Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translation technology can be a formidable weapon, for good or for ill. What do we as translators want from translation technology? What do we fear? How can we find positive and meaningful ways to avoid feeling cornered by technology? How can we employ it to liberate us from the sub-par aspects of our work as translators? This interactive session will try to answer some of those questions and shed some hopeful light on the future of translation technology and our industry.

LT-9 First Date: A Dialogue Between Translators and Machine Translation Developers
Laurie M. Gerber
(Saturday, 9:00-10:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will consist of three parts. First, translators (some recruited in advance, but spontaneous contributions will be welcome) will talk about what they need and want from technology. Second, machine translation/language technology developers (recruited in advance from a known community of experts) will talk about what their technology can do. Software capabilities will be described in simple terms. Next, the group will review and discuss input from translators and developers to see if there is any overlap.

LT-10 Simplified Technical English: Cost Savings and Quality Assurance for Translations
Berry Braster
(Saturday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Simplified Technical English (also known as Controlled or Standardized English) is a method of writing that makes technical English easy to understand. The use of Simplified Technical English and consistent terminology stimulates global acceptance of technical documentation, since it improves readability and prevents misunderstandings and misinterpretations. Using Simplified Technical English and consistent terminology as a source for translations will dramatically improve the turnaround time and quality of the translation while reducing the overall cost. Case studies will be presented.

LT-11 Automation and Alienation: The Effects of Machine Translation on Current Working Practices
Rosana N. Wolochwianski
(Saturday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The presenter will briefly review the history of machine translation (MT), the different types of MT programs available, and their current limits. The focus will then turn to the two main directions in which MT works: assimilation and dissemination. Finally, by taking a look at current user scenarios, the presenter will discuss the impact of MT on the different players of the translation arena and analyze the pros and cons of this complex industry tool.

LT-12 Best of Both Worlds: Combining Windows and Linux
Topi K. Junkkari
NEW TIME (Saturday, 9:00-10:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Today's translators face a dilemma concerning their choice of a computer environment. Linux and other open source software are becoming common and bring clear advantages. However, many tools and applications specific to our profession are only available on the Windows platform. This presentation will demonstrate that it is possible to enjoy the benefits of both worlds in the small translation office. Topics covered will include Samba file servers, virtual machines to run Windows applications on Linux, dual-boot systems, and remote access.

LT-13 Mixing Computer-assisted Translation and Machine Translation: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Giovana C. Boselli and Cristina Silva
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Curious to learn more about how much a translator could really benefit from this daunting combination, we conducted an experiment and would like to share our results. We will discuss our process and disclose some statistics in an attempt to provide translation and localization professionals with some empirical information on the combined use of machine translation and computer-assisted translation.

LT-14 CANCELLED Non- and Meta-linguistic Aspects of Web Localization
Romina L. Marazzato
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

LT-15 Where is Language Technology Going?
Jennifer DeCamp
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will describe the technology, social, and political factors that are shaping today's translation tools and use. The speaker will also review trends and predictions for one year, three years, five years, and 10 years out for types of tools and technology practices. This presentation will be helpful to companies and individuals planning for providing language services and/or tools for language services.

LT-16 NEW SESSION Quality in Website Localization: How to Successfully Translate Any Website
Miguel A. Jimenez
(Friday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The translation of websites represents a new translation process that has grown exponentially during the past several years. The widespread use of translation memory programs that handle Web texts, as well as the fact that this process is less technologically complex than software localization, has led to an increase in the number of websites that are being localized by translators who are unaware of the complexity and peculiarities of this type of work. This presentation will summarize the most important textual, technological, communicative, and cognitive aspects that are usually forgotten during the localization process.

 
Language Technology

Related Sessions

SEM-J How to Get the Most Out of Your Computer: Tips for Small Business Owners

J-1 Optimizing Terminology Mining

SL-2 Software Tools for Slavists, Part I

SL-3 Software Tools for Slavists, Part II

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  Legal Translation & Interpreting
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LAW-1 Tape Transcription and the Translation of Evidence Tapes
María Cecilia Marty
(Thursday, 2:00-3:30pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

This presentation will cover the following topics: why tape transcription and translation is necessary; federal rules of evidence; transcribing evidence tapes; translating evidence tapes; certification; how to prepare as an expert witness when testifying as to your own transcription/translation; how to prepare as an expert witness when testifying as to someone else’s transcription/translation; how to prepare an expert opinion report; making the case for one official court transcript; presenting transcription and translation to the jury; and formatting.

LAW-2 The Quest for Precision in Legal Translation
Mirtha N. Federico
(Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Legal language has its own distinguishing features that frequently challenge translators, such as multiple negation, impersonal constructions, complex sentences, and archaic vocabulary. This presentation will provide participants with legal notions, focusing on concepts from the law of torts. It will include examples and suggestions on alternative ways of coping with the translation of some contract provisions, such as liability, warranties, damages, and miscellaneous clauses and court decisions. Participants will be encouraged to use the lexical items and concepts discussed in the translation of actual documents and cases.

LAW-3 From Asylum Interviews to Courtroom Interpreting
Marianne Teleki and Ana Maria Varela Gill
(Friday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The presenters, both immigration court interpreters for over 15 years combined, will provide an overview of the asylum process, including the three different types of asylum applications and an overview of the immigration court and the two main types of relief sought. The presenters will discuss the role of the interpreter working in both settings and the unique challenges that interpreters face, particularly indigenous and rare language interpreters during asylum interviews and immigration proceedings.

LAW-4 Walking Out Free: The Pivotal Role of an Interpreter within a Capital Murder Case
Jacki J. Noh
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In 1989, a man was accused of killing three people. Given the lack of qualified interpreters, he served a year waiting for the triple murder trial to commence. He pleaded not guilty and maintained his innocence with full knowledge that he might be sentenced to death if the jury found him guilty. In May 1990, a local newspaper printed the headline, Walking Out Free; Innocent Verdict for Paek Greeted by Cheers, Tears. The speaker will share the lessons learned from this assignment as an interpreter while unfolding this remarkable story step-by-step from jury selection to deliberation.

LAW-5 CANCELLED Assessing the Cost of Interpreters Using Interruptions in the Courtroom
Marianne Mason
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

LAW-6 A New Manual on Legal Translation
Lillian S. Clementi, Lois M. Feuerle, Joe McClinton, and Kate Walker
(Saturday, 9:00-10:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

A group of seasoned ATA legal translators is currently preparing a manual on legal translation into U.S. English. Legal Translation: The Practitioner's Perspective aims to be a practical, comprehensive, reliable resource for both experienced legal translators and those interested in branching out into the field. Several of the book's contributors will outline its content and preview some solutions to problem points that legal translators are likely to find useful. There will also be time for questions and audience suggestions about additional material to cover.

LAW-7 CANCELLED The Challenges of Nuremberg and Beyond: Interpreting at International Tribunals II
Nancy Schweda Nicholson
(Saturday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

LAW-8 CANCELLED Translating Business Organizations in the U.S., England, and Brazil: An International Approach
Marina Bevilacqua de La Touloubre
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

LAW-9 CANCELLED Effective Audio Translation for Courts and Intelligence Communities
Yvette Hovsepian Bearce
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

 
Legal Translation & Interpreting

Related Sessions

SEM-G Linguistic & Cultural Issues of Tape Transcription & Translation

SEM-I Traps and Challenges of Spanish-language Dialectal Speech: An Interpreter's Nightmare

SEM-N An Introduction to the European Union, U.S., and U.K. Legal Systems

G-1 What is a Societas Europaea and Why are Companies Establishing this Truly European Type of Company?

I-2 The Pitfalls of Long Consecutive in the Courtroom: Learning When to Use It and When Not to

I-4 A Health Care Interpreter’s Best Friend: The National Code of Ethics for Interpreters in Health Care

I-6 Simultaneous Court Interpreting Techniques

I-7 From Heritage Speaker to Professional Interpreter

J-9 Deposition Interpreting Workshop

MED-8 The Effects of Translating and Interpreting Trauma

P-5 Objection Your Honor: What to do When Your Translation is Overruled

P-6 Remedies in Common Law and Equity: What to do When You are Faced with this Term

SL-8 Translating Legal Russian into English

S-1 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Translation and Interpreting in the Legal, Medical, and Community Sectors

S-9 Untangling the Labyrinth of Spanish Legal Jargon

MED-6 Speaking Together: Findings from a Hospital Disparities Collaborative

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  Literary
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

L-1 Servitude or Collaboration? Approaches to Play Translation
Phyllis Zatlin
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

Louis Kelly observed that fidelity to the author means either servitude or collaboration. Before opting for creative adaptation, it behooves the translator to have the author's permission. Playwright response, even of the same author to two different texts, may vary. The speaker will refer to three plays she undertook to translate, and how she and the authors approached collaboration. These texts are Hora de visita and Un hombre de suerte, by Alonso de Santos, and Cabaret diabolic (Cabaret diabólico), by the Catalan writer Beth Escudé I Gallès.

L-2 Marilyn Gaddis Rose Lecture: The Story of Suite Française
Sandra Smith
(Thursday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The discovery of Irène Némirovsky's Suite Française as the very events of World War II unfolded in France has captured the imagination of people worldwide. Published after remaining in a suitcase for over 60 years, the book has been translated into 28 languages. Its English translator, Sandra Smith, will talk about the novel's discovery, her involvement in the English publication, the author's extraordinary surviving daughter, Denise Epstein (now 77), the revival and translation of many more of Némirovsky's works, and the amazing coincidences involved in this truly life-changing adventure.

L-3 Translating Poetry: The Myth of Betrayal
Fadel K. Jabr
(Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The translation of poetry has been accused of being a betrayal of the original text. This session will contrast two English translations of a poem by the prominent Iraqi poet Badr Shaker Al-Sayyab to both illustrate betrayal and demonstrate faithfulness. Accurate translations must convey loyalty to the words, meanings, and images of the original work. This requires knowledge not only of the source and target languages, but of the culture of the poet and poetry itself. Successful translations of poetry replicate not merely the text, but the entire poetic experience.

L-4 Edward FitzGerald and Omar Khayyam
Anthony P. Briggs
(Friday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The presenter will tell the story of the penny pamphlet that became the best-selling book of poetry in the world. Despite its universal popularity the genius of its author has not been accepted. He is regarded as a (mere) translator. The story of Edward FitzGerald and his translation of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam raises many questions. What is translation? Is it an art, trade, or skill? What translation strategies are available? Why is translation so badly rewarded and undervalued? Can we do anything to restore FitzGerald's reputation on the eve of a double celebration of him and his work in 2009?

L-5 Why is a Poetic Translator like a Philandering Husband?
Lydia Razran Stone
(NEW TIME Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The answer to this riddle is that in both cases the perpetrators' self-esteem is based on justifying their infidelities to themselves. This comparison will be explored with reference to a translation of the poem In Holy Week by Boris Pasternak. Attendees do not have to know Russian, since the poetic translation will be compared to a literal English one. Attention will be focused on the various compromises a poetic translator is compelled to make, and ways of deciding if any given compromise (infidelity) is acceptable.

L-6 Five Translators Translating: Reading Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian in English and Spanish
Michael S. Doyle
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

To read Blood Meridian, the major esthetic achievement of any living American writer, in its original English is to become already engaged in the act of translation. Whether to translate or not is rhetorical. The reader of this apocalyptic gothic-picaresque novel has no choice in the matter. Translation is inscribed as part and parcel of Blood Meridian. A distinctive thread woven into the fabric of the novel, it has five principal translator protagonists for the English>Spanish reader.

L-7 CANCELLED Rumi in English Translations: From Literal to Blank Verse
Soroosh Shahriari
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm)

L-8 Sandy Taylor: Letting Their Voices Be Heard
Jo Anne Engelbert, Wayne Karlin, and Elizabeth Lowe McCoy
(Saturday, 9:00-10:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Sandy Taylor, founder and director of Curbstone Press, died on December 21, 2007. His contribution to translation was stunning. Curbstone's focus on literature of political witness gave us 100 powerful works from Central America, Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, and Vietnam. A superbly gifted translator and poet himself, Sandy was the brilliant and sensitive editor every translator dreams of. He brought writers and translators together, and he listened intently when they spoke. Curbstone translators will honor Sandy's achievement and recount key experiences, such as sleeping on the floor between presses on the famous Curbstone mattress signed by innumerable writers.

L-9 Literary Division Annual Meeting
Enrica J. Ardemagni
(Saturday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Literary Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other translators and interpreters. We will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2009. All division members are encouraged to attend, and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.

L-10 Translation from the Theoretical Perspectives of Culture and Linguistics: Examples from China and Haiti
Carrol F. Coates, Marilyn Gaddis Rose, and Meihua Song
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Teaching literature in translation provides an opportunity to demonstrate what translating does and how a translation results. The speaker's recent experience teaching Jules Verne in English to an ethnically diverse class empowered students who could comment from a divergent language or cultural base.

L-11 NEW SESSION In Other Words ... Editing Translations
Julian O. Thorsteinson
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Editing translation patent text references a latent source by another author, in another language, that has authority over the target. In addition to all the standard editorial skills, the editor must also factor in the linguistic and cultural context of the invisible source. A two-fold editorial process must first ensure the integrity of the translation against the source, and then must liberate the text from its source so that it can stand alone. With special interest in critical theory and the role of exegesis in the translation process, this presentation will discuss both literary and pragmatic translation.

 
Literary

Related Sessions

SEM-H The Evaluation of Poetry Translation

C-2 Cultures and Values as Reflected in Idioms and Proverbs of Asian and English Languages

F-3 An Interview with Sandra Smith

F-4 Walking the Tightrope

F-5 La versification classique au XXIe siècle, ou le carcan au service de l'expressivité

P-1 Orality Markers in Brazilian Portuguese

SL-5 Susanna Greiss Lecture: Leo Tolstoy and War and Peace

TP-1 The Role of Explication de Texte in Literary and Technical Translation

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  Media
There are no sessions at this time.


 
Media

Related Sessions

K-3 How to Translate the Cultural Factors in Media Translation

K-5 Media Translation: Aesthetics of Communication

P-5 Objection Your Honor: What to do When Your Translation is Overruled

V-4 Copywriting, Adaptation, Localization, Translation?

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  Medical Translation & Interpreting
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

MED-1 National Coalition on Health Care Interpreter Certification: A Progress Report
Elizabeth A. Nguyen and Virginia Perez-Santalla
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Within the past two years, important advancements have been made in the development of a credible, inclusive, and transparent national certification process for health care interpreters. The National Coalition on Health Care Interpreter Certification, made up of representatives from across the spectrum of stakeholders, held its first meeting in May to oversee the development of a national certification process. In this presentation, the Coalition's Coordinating Committee will report on the work of the Coalition to date, give an overview of next steps, and engage participants in a discussion on national certification.

MED-2 A Collaborative Approach to Interpreting the Mental Status Exam
Zarita Araujo-Lane and Aida Cases
(Thursday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Dementia can be devastating to patients, who are often aware of their loss of ability to remember, to make decisions, and to generally cope in the world. It is also devastating to family and loved ones who now need to care for the patient much like a child. Through a case study of a middle-aged patient with dementia, we will explore the five domains of function tested in the mental status exam. The presenters will introduce you to two different perspectives on working with patients with dementia. They will also demonstrate collaborative techniques for providers, interpreters, and families.

MED-3 Medical Division Annual Meeting
Mary Esther Diaz
(Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Medical Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other medical translators and interpreters. We will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2009. All division members are encouraged to attend, and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.

MED-4 Stress Management for Medical Interpreters
Janet M. Erickson-Johnson
(Friday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Stress is an issue that all interpreters struggle with to some degree or another in the workplace. In particular, medical interpreters can find themselves in critical situations of trauma that can easily cause stress levels to rise. This presentation will address the issue of stress: its causes, characteristics, signs and symptoms, etc. It will also identify the four kinds of stress and how to cope with each in a constructive way before, during, and after working hours. Practical tips and techniques will be included.

MED-5 Battered and Abused Children: A Pediatrician's Perspective
Matthew Cox
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This presentation will focus on the medical evaluation of children suspected of being victims of physical and sexual abuse. Emphasis will be given to the types of abuse affecting children, the clinical manifestations of abuse, the importance of medical evaluations, and the role of the mandated reporter. Numerous case study examples will be given.

MED-6 Speaking Together: Findings from a Hospital Disparities Collaborative
Catherine West
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The experience of hospitals participating in this learning collaborative shows that hospitals can use traditional quality improvement techniques and performance measures to improve the quality and efficiency of language services. All hospitals were able to use data from performance measurements to implement successful interventions to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of operations. Specifically, hospitals have used performance measures and quality improvement techniques to: 1) better understand and meet demand for language services; 2) ensure that language services are in place at critical times; and 3) provide timely service.

MED-7 CANCELLED Translating Japanese and Chinese Medical Receipts
Robert C. Albon
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

MED-8 The Effects of Translating and Interpreting Trauma
Kathi Fanning and Janice E. Rhyne
(Saturday, 9:00-10:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will address the issues language professionals experience while interpreting and/or translating in both medical and legal settings. Participants will learn about the ways in which trauma effects the language professional both physiologically and emotionally. The presenter will offer tools to reduce stress and increase resiliency.

MED-9 Anatomy of a Pediatric Heart Surgery: What's So Special About the Heart of a Child?
Graciela Zozaya
(Saturday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English (or Spanish if preferred))

This session will cover the many aspects of translating for the child, family, and professional needing to convey information in a surgical situation. We will progress through the many services involved in caring for a child undergoing heart surgery. The presenter will address the challenges of conveying the medical/surgical aspects to parents who cannot see the complex and life-threatening defects in their child's heart. Information will be provided on the people, the processes, and the procedures used in a major pediatric hospital that has developed an excellent support system for its population of non-English speaking families.

MED-10 The Challenge of Interpreting in a Pediatric Facility
Ingrid Y. Wood
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreting for an adult patient in the medical setting can be challenging enough. It becomes even more challenging when the person you are interpreting for is a four-year-old child. How can an interpreter maintain neutrality, achieve accuracy, and facilitate communication in these types of situations? This presentation will discuss the differences between interpreting for an adult patient in a medical setting versus interpreting for a child/teenager and his/her parents at a pediatric hospital. The speaker will also talk about how the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center responds to meet the child’s and family’s needs.

MED-11 CANCELLED Multidrug-resistant Organisms: MRSA Terminology Research and Glossary Development
Patricia M. Thickstun
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

MED-12 NEW SESSION International Medical Interpreters Association Medical Interpreter Certification: An Update
Izabel Arocha
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In the past 12 years, important advancements have occurred in working toward a credible, inclusive, and transparent certification process for medical interpreters. This work started in 1995, when the International Medical Interpreters Association Standards Committee published the first original Medical Interpreting Standards of Practice, and included the competences required for certification. Scheduled to start registering interpreters for certification as early as August 2008, IMIA certification is nearing completion. In this presentation, there will be a report on the work done to date, the process, and an overview of what is to be accomplished.

 
Medical Translation & Interpreting

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SEM-B Mental Health Terminology

I-4 A Health Care Interpreter’s Best Friend: The National Code of Ethics for Interpreters in Health Care

I-7 From Heritage Speaker to Professional Interpreter

J-7 Medical Interpreting: Navigating the U.S. Health Care System for Japanese Patients

S-1 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Translation and Interpreting in the Legal, Medical, and Community Sectors

TP-2 ATA Research Forum, Part I: Young Bilinguals as a Language Resource and as Language Brokers

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  Science & Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ST-1 Translation of a Geology Textbook (French-English)
Patricia Bobeck
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This presentation will describe a project to translate a university-level geology textbook from French into English. The project requires the translator to have a broad understanding of geological concepts and a keen sensitivity to terminology differences between the languages. The presenter will discuss the organization and methodology of the translation process, information sources (dictionaries), and differences between French and English technical writing.

 
Science & Technology

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F-2 Technical Translation for the Cosmetic Industry, Part II

J-4 Environmental Translation: An Overview of the Market

J-6 Coining and Controlling New Terms in a High-tech Business

J-10 Ins and Outs of Japanese Automotive Translation

K-2 Korean Patent Translation: Specific Examples and Useful Tools

LT-10 Simplified Technical English: Cost Savings and Quality Assurance for Translations

S-6 Spanish is Served with Different Flavors

TP-1 The Role of Explication de Texte in Literary and Technical Translation

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  Terminology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TERM-1 Overcoming Termbase Trepidation: A Guide to Building a Better Termbase for the Harried Translator or Project Manager
Jason F. Kopp
(Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Are you interested in terminology management, but not sure where to start? Do you feel like managing your terminology database is beyond your control? A properly designed termbase often provides an invaluable resource for increasing both productivity and terminological consistency. Most mid-size and small language service providers have limited time and resources available for managing terminology. In order to fully harness the power of a termbase it is important to know how to properly organize your data. This session will set forth a simple, uniform process to help you do just that.

TERM-2 Terminology Translation Challenges from Commonly Used Languages into Less Commonly Used Languages
Mehrzad Shahi
(Friday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

When translating from a commonly used language (e.g., English) into a less commonly used language (e.g., Dari), some cultural concepts cannot be easily translated. For example, a concept that can be conveyed in only a few words in common languages must be explained in a sentence or two in the target language. This poses problems, including simultaneous interpreting time constraints, space restrictions on websites, and dubbing time limits for audio and video. This session will discuss some solutions for translating terminology from a commonly used language into a less commonly used language.

 
Terminology

Related Sessions

J-1 Optimizing Terminology Mining

J-6 Coining and Controlling New Terms in a High-tech Business

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  Training & Pedagogy
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TP-1 The Role of Explication de Texte in Literary and Technical Translation
Alexander Rainof
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English and French, with some Spanish)

French students practice explication de texte at both secondary and post-secondary levels. The method is excellent and somewhat neglected in the U.S., but it is of paramount importance to the translator. This presentation will discuss explication de texte in terms of both literary and technical texts, with examples taken from Flaubert, Baudelaire, Ionesco, and a fairly involved and complex legal document. The literary part of the presentation will be given in English and French, and the legal part in English and Spanish.

TP-2 ATA Research Forum, Part I: Young Bilinguals as a Language Resource and as Language Brokers
Claudia V. Angelelli and Holly E. Jacobson
(Thursday, 2:00-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session will explore bilingualism and access to health care. One approach for addressing health disparities is to increase the diversity of the health workforce. We will discuss how to increase the representation of Latino students in the health professions, including health care interpreting and translation. We will then discuss some existing solutions for implementing interpreting and translation coursework at the high school level. Although data and examples will be drawn from students working with English and Spanish, the discussion will be applicable to other language combinations.

TP-3 ATA Research Forum, Part II: Research, Huh? What's in it for Translators, Interpreters, and Educators?
Claudia V. Angelelli and Holly E. Jacobson
(Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This presentation will explore connections between practice and research. Participants are encouraged to bring issues related to translation or interpreting practice, teaching, or testing. Participants will be encouraged to explore what advantages research can offer. In addition, we will learn how to turn issues affecting our practice into research questions, which, if answered, would inform their practice. The moderators will bring to bear current research in various areas affecting translation and interpreting, including—but not limited to—assessment and measurement, bilingualism, corpus analysis, cognitive skills, second language acquisition, and teacher preparation.

TP-4 Techniques for Teaching Translation Online
Alison K. Dundy, Grant Hamilton, and Eve E. Hecht
(Friday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Increasing numbers of students are choosing online over onsite courses. Translation lends itself particularly well to teaching in this format. In this session, New York University faculty will share their perspectives on teaching translation and techniques for fostering interactive education in an online format.

TP-5 Strategies and Techniques for Interpreter Training
Reynaldo J. Pagura
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will provide an overview of conference interpreter training, including classroom strategies as well as suggestions for self-training. It will discuss the rationale behind each strategy and provide the audience with some (limited) opportunities for hands-on practice. The techniques and strategies are not language-specific, so they should work with any language pair. For the sake of demonstration and practice, we will use examples from French, Spanish, and Portuguese into English.

TP-6 Doctoral Programs in Translation Studies in the U.S.: A Student's Perspective
Tatyana Bystrova-McIntyre, Nelson López, and Dave Summers
(Friday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

There are two doctorate programs in translation studies in the U.S., one at Binghamton University and the other at Kent State University. Students from these schools will share their experiences in the programs, which are designed to train the next generation of translation scholars and industry leaders. Students will discuss their motivations for pursuing the Ph.D., as well as how these programs are set up to benefit their areas of interest and prepare them for various careers in academia and the language industry. The discussion will be followed by a question-and-answer session.

TP-7 Everything You Wanted to Know About Teaching Translation and Interpreting But Were Afraid to Ask!
Claudia V. Angelelli, Sonia Colina, Christian Degueldre, Holly E. Jacobson, and Geoffrey S. Koby
(Saturday, 9:00-10:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The 2006 and 2007 ATA conference surveys revealed participants' interest in a session where they could have a conversation with experts teaching translation and interpreting. In response, this interactive session brings together expertise and experience in teaching translation and interpreting at different levels and for different learners. Panelists will address issues of classroom management, material design, skill development, and assessment. Bring your questions and join us for a thought-provoking discussion!

TP-8 Peer Modeling and Translation Training: A Study of Influences of Role Models on Translation Trainees
Jenny Y. Wong
(Saturday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

There has been an increasing amount of interest in the construction of a peer learning or student-centered environment in translation pedagogy. This study represents the first step toward quantifying the effects of modeling on translator learning. Three groups of subjects at different stages of their professional development were asked to participate in this research, which gauged their acquisition and retention of translation strategies adopted from their role models over a period of three weeks. The outcomes of this study suggest that peer modeling has profound influences on translators' behaviors and has sound implications for translation trainers.

TP-9 Professional Internships for Translation Students
Sue Ellen Wright
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The participation of students of translation, particularly at the M.A. level, in professional internships is a valuable asset not only to the students involved, but also to the profession as a whole. This level of experience provides students with hands-on practical industry experience, while at the same time providing translation service providers and other employers with the opportunity to help mold the careers of the future members of the profession. The discussion panel will include a cross-section of students who have served successful internships, translator trainers who have coordinated internships, and companies and other venues that have provided internships.

TP-10 The Arizona Translation Collaborative and Online Translator Education Program
Sonia Colina
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Arizona Translation Collaborative (AZTC) is an online training and research initiative funded by the University of Arizona and the Arizona Board of Regents. Its mission is threefold: 1) to facilitate and promote the integration of research, teaching, practice, and outreach in translation; 2) to facilitate the exchange, sharing, and dissemination of ideas and resources among researchers, teachers, students, professionals, translation users, decision makers, and community members; and 3) to support partnerships that promote the integration of these areas. This presentation will describe some current AZTC projects, including the Online Translator Education Program.

TP-11 Giving Quality Feedback in Interpreter Training
Carmen Nigro
(Saturday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Giving quality feedback to students in interpreting classes is essential to ensure their progress. This requires knowing the skills and objectives that students have to pursue, but also a certain approach on the part of the teacher that includes the use of metaphors, analogies, clear instructions, and constructive criticism. During the presentation, examples of constructive feedback and the results obtained in interpreting classes will be given. The presentation will also provide tips and advice on how to give feedback on what to do and what not to do to help interpreting students gain confidence and become aware of their strengths and weaknesses.

 
Training & Pedagogy

Related Sessions

S-8 Error-making Consistency Across Diverse Translation and Interpreting Students

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V-1 Sanskrit: Linguistic Wonder of the World
Terence Coe
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Sanskrit is a goldmine for language lovers, but many people know little about it. Despite its intimidating reputation, its basic structure is not overly difficult. Its rich vocabulary pervades our speech even today. The speaker will provide a brief overview of Sanskrit's most fascinating aspects, from its incredibly precise phonetics and dazzlingly flexible root-based structure to its versatility in word formation and the use of meter for memorization.

V-2 Standards: How Can They Help a Translator?
Beatriz A. Bonnet and Alan K. Melby
(Friday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The American and European translation quality assurance standards were published over a year ago. Their existence alone does not make them useful. This presentation will begin with a summary of the brochure about standards, Translation: Standards for Buying a Non-Commodity, which is available on ATA’s website (www.atanet.org/docs/translation_buying_guide.pdf). The focus will then turn to how a translator can use the brochure and the standards themselves to improve communication with clients, directly or in partnership with a translation company. At the end of the presentation, translators will be invited to get involved in the development of the forthcoming international standard on translation parameters.

V-3 Mistranslation of Intended Meaning in the Case of Farsi
Shayesteh Zarrabi
(Saturday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Mistranslation poses a potential threat to diplomatic relations. One type of misunderstanding occurs when sentences have more than one meaning depending on how they are read. For example, "I am not going to talk to him as you did" can mean: 1) "I won't talk to him because you already did."; or 2) "I will talk to him, but not the way you did." Depending on where the stress is, how the words are arranged, or the context, the interpretation can differ. Iranian diplomat statements are full of such ambiguities. This presentation will discuss these issues, giving examples from Farsi.

V-4 Copywriting, Adaptation, Localization, Translation?
Anne Renucci and Maurizio Toria
(Saturday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English with German, Italian, and French examples)

Globalization has far-reaching repercussions. Translation is now required in fields as diverse as movies, television, advertising, and even stand-up comedy. As translators, we are faced with the challenge of being funny and creative, using metaphors that work in several countries and cultures, and capturing the attention of readers everywhere, all within ever-tightening deadlines. Where does translation end and copywriting begin? This presentation will include examples from German and English into Italian and French, leading up to a question-and-answer discussion.

V-5 NEW SESSION Can There Really Be a Shortage of Translators? The View of the United Nations Language Services
Stephen Sekel
(Thursday, 4:00-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Demographic trends project that nearly 24% of established translators will retire within the next five years, while educational trends are reducing the pool of potential language specialists. This session will describe the profile of a United Nations (UN) language specialist—translators, interpreters, editors, verbatim reporters, copy-preparers, and proofreaders—and will discuss the required educational background, experience, and skills. UN recruitment procedures, eligibility requirements, competitive examinations, and determination of entry level will also be presented, as well as the UN's current response to the situation through their outreach to universities, training institutions, and professional associations.

V-6 NEW SESSION A Case Study in Local Government Translation: Orange County, Florida
Marie King
(Thursday, 2:00-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Many federal government agencies are translating their materials into different languages. Most federal agencies include Spanish versions of their publications, websites, public service announcements, and other materials. The challenge for smaller local governments—with limited resources—is how to improve access to information and services for persons with limited English proficiency. This presentation will explore language challenges and opportunities, and how one local government has responded to meet these needs.



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