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ATA 50th Annual Conference Registration
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Sessions by Specialization

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Select a specialization below to see the sessions offered:

ATA ATA Activities I Interpreting
IC Independent Contractors L Literary Translation
LAW Legal T&I LT Language Technology
MED Medical T&I ST Science & Technology
TP Training and Pedagogy TRM Terminology


ATA Activities
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ATA-1 Opening Session
Jiri Stejskal and Nicholas Hartmann
(Thursday, ; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Start the conference off right by attending the Opening Session!


ATA-2 Presentation of Candidates and Election
Jiri Stejskal
(Thursday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Hear the candidates for ATA's Board of Directors voice their opinions and then make them hear yours by exercising the right to vote. You must be an Active or Corresponding member of ATA to vote.


ATA-3 Annual Meeting of Division Administrators
Frieda Ruppaner-Lind
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; By Invitation Only; Presented in: English)




ATA-4 Orientation for First-time Conference Attendees
Jill R. Sommer and Amanda B. Ennis
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

If you are a first-time attendee, the official program may seem overwhelming and somewhat confusing. The presentation will outline a few strategies to help make the most of your experience in New York. Learn to choose between equally appealing sessions; how to read the map and navigate crowded hallways; why the colored dots are important; which gatherings are invitation-only and which are open to all; the best times to tour the exhibits; strategies for using the Job Marketplace room; and other practical information. Preconference tip: make sure you attend the Wednesday night Opening Reception, and do wear your colored dot(s)!


ATA-5 Annual Meeting of All Members
Jiri Stejskal
(Friday, ; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Find out what your association has accomplished and the goals that are being set. Members of the audience will be given an opportunity to ask questions and make comments to ATA Board members and committee chairs.


ATA-6 Preparing to Take the ATA Certification Exam: Questions and Answers
Jutta Diel-Dominique
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This forum will be of interest to ATA members who seek a better understanding of ATA's Certification Program. The presenters will respond to questions from the audience about certification policies and procedures.


ATA-7 How to Recharge Your Local Chapter or Regional Group
Caitilin Walsh
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




ATA-8 NEW SESSION
Grader Recruitment for ATA's Certification Program
Jutta Diel-Dominique
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The ATA Certification Program is always looking to refresh its grading pool. If you are ATA-certified and have the time to devote to furthering the goals of the program, you might be a good candidate to join one of our grader workgroups. Come learn more about the responsibilities and benefits of being a part of this group of professionals.


ATA Activities
Related Sessions

Seminar F Jurassic Parliament: Lessons for Leaders

C-2 Chinese>English Translation: Trials and Errors or Vice Versa

C-3 Chinese Language Division Annual Meeting

G-3 German Language Division Annual Meeting

IC-2 Up the Down Economy! Growing Your Practice with ATA's Client Outreach Kit

I-4 Interpreters Division Annual Meeting

IT-4 Italian Language Division Annual Meeting

J-6 Japanese<>English Certification Workshop

J-8 Japanese Language Division Annual Meeting

K-4 Korean Language Division Annual Meeting

LSP-9 Translation Company Division Annual Meeting

LT-7 Language Technology Division Annual Meeting

L-6 Literary Division Annual Meeting

MED-5 Medical Division Annual Meeting

N-5 Scandinavian>English Translation Workshop

N-6 Nordic Division Annual Meeting

P-3 Portuguese Language Division Annual Meeting

S-3 Spanish Language Division Annual Meeting

S-4 Prepare for ATA's English>Spanish Certification Exam

S-5 Prepare for ATA's English>Spanish Certification Exam, Part II

Interpreting
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

I-1 A New Era of Rhetoric: Interpreting the Inauguration
Franz Poechhacker
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The inauguration of the 44th President of the United States was a worldwide media event, and Barack Obama's speech was broadcast live in many countries via simultaneous interpreters. This presentation will offer background information on presidential rhetoric and an analysis of President Obama's speech, with special reference to its challenges for simultaneous interpreters. Aside from anecdotal reports on how the speech was received in China and Japan, the presentation will focus on a comparative analysis of six versions of simultaneous interpretations of the speech into German that were broadcast live, highlighting the strategies employed by professionals.


I-2 That Crucial First Step: Pre-Assignment Preparation and Research
Kelly Moudy-Gomes
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

While some interpreters have been known to bemoan the need to prepare before an assignment, others are sometimes at a loss as to how to proceed. This workshop will first examine why pre-assignment research and preparation is so important to ensure quality interpreting (particularly with regard to mental processing capacity). Tips and strategies for each component of preparation will be discussed. Areas of focus will include creating and maintaining glossaries, optimizing online research, practicing with extemporaneous speeches, and "morning of" warm-up exercises. The workshop will also include a short discussion on longer-term terminology and background knowledge research.


I-3 From Asylum Interviews to Immigration Court
Marianne Teleki and Ana Maria Varela Gill
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speakers, both immigration court interpreters for over 15 years combined, will provide an overview of the asylum process. Topics will include the three different types of asylum applications, an overview of the immigration court, and the two main types of relief sought. The presenters will discuss the role of the interpreter working in both settings and the unique challenges that interpreters face, including interpreting indigenous and rare languages during asylum interviews and immigration proceedings. The speakers will also discuss how to prepare for a hearing in immigration court, including the specialized terminology needed and where to find it.


I-4 Interpreters Division Annual Meeting
Robert K. Brara
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Interpreters Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other interpreters. We will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2010. All division members are encouraged to attend, and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.


I-5 Mental Health Interpreting: Unique Challenges and Practical Solutions
Arianna M. Aguilar
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Mental health interpreting is an important subset of study, since the issues encountered intersect with both medical and legal interpreting theory and the code of ethics. It also involves complex and intimate interpersonal communication with individuals who may act, speak, or think in unusual ways. There are laws that may even require the interpreter to break confidentiality or intervene. How can mental health interpreters face these issues successfully while maintaining impartiality in order to diminish potential emotional/ethical challenges? This presentation will explore these issues, with real-life case studies and practical solutions.


I-6 Unlocking the Booth: Interpreter Secrets and Tactics Revealed
Ewandro Magalhaes
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Do interpreters know every word out there? Do they ever freeze mid-sentence? Can they take back whatever they said? Do they ever make mistakes? Can they get away with them, and if so...how? Is there such a thing as "booth fright?" How do they cope? These questions, which are among the most commonly asked when it comes to conference interpreting, will be addressed during this presentation. The most important techniques for coping with interpreting snafus, as well as mental strategies for overcoming anxiety and keeping things in perspective, will also be reviewed.


I-7 Beyond Control: Interpreting the Spanish No-Fault Se Construction in Cases of Domestic Violence
Madalena Sanchez Zampaulo
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

As many Spanish<>English interpreters are aware, the pronoun se in Spanish passive verb constructions does not address a specific agent as responsible for an action. This construction can prove difficult to interpret, and therefore possibly result in an inaccurate interpretation. In cases of domestic violence in particular, this linguistic phenomenon may alter the message to the point of placing blame on the innocent or allowing the guilty to go free. The speaker will demonstrate the importance of accurately interpreting agentless passives from Spanish into English and vice versa.


I-8 Sight Translation and Written Translation by Interpreters: New Guidelines
Bruce T. Downing
(Saturday, ; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreters are not translators, yet health care interpreters are often asked to read and orally transmit written texts or write out care instructions in the patient's language. We will discuss appropriate and ethical responses to such requests while taking into consideration interpreter and patient literacy and the respective roles of the provider and interpreter. This presentation will reference guidelines on sight translation and written translation by interpreters that were recently published by the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care. It will also consider expectations and practices in legal, educational, and medical interpreting. Participants' experiences and views on the issues involved are welcome.


I-9 Telephone Interpreting Goes Global
Nataly E. Kelly
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

By 2012, the worldwide market for telephone interpreting will reach an estimated $1.2 billion. Today, some of the largest providers are based in the Netherlands, Sweden, Canada, and the U.K. Telephone interpreting is also growing in Ireland, Japan, Korea, India, South Africa, and Israel. Participants will learn about the global nature of the telephone interpreting industry, along with the possibilities offered and challenges presented as this delivery method continues to expand its reach.


I-10 An Open Dialog on National Interpreter Certification: Possibility or Pipe Dream?
Barry S. Olsen, Holly Mikkelson, Jody Gill, Katharine Allen, and Marjory A. Bancroft
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

With the need for qualified interpreters growing across the U.S., the demand for national interpreter certification has gained momentum. Certification processes exist in certain sectors of interpreting and for sign language interpreters; however, no single national body certifies all interpreters. This session explores national interpreter certification, including possible benefits, obstacles, and feasibility. Five panelists will share insights on what a national certification process should entail. The bulk of the session will be an open dialog with attendees about the future of interpreter certification.


Interpreting
Related Sessions

Seminar B Beyond 40 Hours: Matching Extended Training with Interpreter Needs

Seminar C

Seminar E Stories from the Booth: The Practical Side of Simultaneous

Seminar M Team Interpreting in the Courtroom, the Code of Ethics, and Personal Responsibilities

Seminar P Interpreting Outside the Booth: Mastering the Use of Portable Equipment

J-3 Workshop: Translation and Interpreting During the Discovery Process in Civil Litigation

K-5 Check/Main Interpreting in Commercial Litigation Involving Korean Technology Companies in the U.S.

K-6 Cultivating a Successful Career as a Korean Interpreter and Translator

TP-4 Different Approaches to Interpreter Training

Independent Contractors
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

IC-1 Signals of Shift in the Language Industry: Are You In or Are You Out?
Renato S. Beninatto
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

First, translations were handwritten. Then, there were typewriters, computers, and translation memories. Each milestone demanded a shift in the way translation work was done. We are on the threshold of a major paradigm shift where old standards and ideas are being left behind. Translators and language services providers who are ready to make the shift now will stand to profit and grow. Those who like the status quo and accept "the rules" will wonder why they just don't make money like they used to. This will be an engaging presentation that is guaranteed to make you think. You've been warned!


IC-2 Up the Down Economy! Growing Your Practice with ATA's Client Outreach Kit
Lillian S. Clementi and Chris Durban
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Enhance your direct client portfolio by using ATA's new Client Outreach Kit to position yourself as a resource for translation buyers and users. Centered around a customizable PowerPoint presentation that members can tailor to their needs, the kit will also include modules on key client outreach skills, which will be featured in this session. After a brief introduction to the core PowerPoint presentation, the presenters will provide practical tips on writing and delivering an elevator speech, developing effective speaking techniques, writing an introduction for yourself, dealing with a question-and-answer session, and getting speaking invitations.


IC-3 How to Successfully Market Yourself to Translation Companies
George Rimalower
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Agencies use hundreds of translators. Unless you stand out from the crowd, you may be overlooked. Solid translation skills are no longer all that it takes to be a successful translator. This session explores how to enhance your standing with translation companies. Translators attending this session will learn how they can become the kind of translators agencies prefer to work with. Discussions will address the best ways to approach a prospective agency and how to "sell" your services.


IC-4 Editing Etiquette
George Rimalower
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The editing process is an integral part of the life cycle of a translation project. The editor fine-tunes the translation in order to improve readability, thus ensuring that a translation's linguistic and cultural content is uncompromised. This presentation will focus on the importance of details, good and effective communication skills, the use of glossaries and online tools, access to experts, and interactions with other team members. It will be useful to project managers, translators, and editors.


IC-5 Web 2.0 for Translation Industry Professionals
Eve Lindemuth Bodeux, Corinne L. McKay, and Michael Wahlster
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Find out what the next stage of the Internet can do for you as a language professional. Learn how to leverage blogging, podcasting, social networking, and other Web 2.0 media for marketing and professional development. We will discuss how to use resources such as LinkedIn, Twitter, and others for marketing and promotion, virtual networking with colleagues, and sharing information.


IC-6
Jorge U. Ungo
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)




IC-7 40 More Ways Project Managers Drive Translators Crazy
Joe McClinton and Leah Ruggiero-Ortiz
(Saturday, ; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Approximately 82.7% of all disasters between translators and translation companies are preventable. (Okay, we made that figure up, but you get the point.). Have you ever been burned so badly by a translation company or been so appalled by a translator's performance that you swore you would never work with them again? Maybe it did not need to happen. Two seasoned professionals from each side of the fence will try to prove that communication across the fence is still possible.


IC-8 Lessons from Business School: The Entrepreneurial Linguist
Judy A. Jenner
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Linguists excel in the humanities, but most have little or no formal training in business. This hands-on presentation will focus on finance/economics (e.g., pricing and supply and demand); marketing (especially to direct clients and social media); accounting (e.g., decreasing expenses); entrepreneurship (e.g., generating new business); and negotiating. The presentation will feature many discussion starters for the audience.


IC-9 CANCELLED
Translator Turned Interpreter: Benefits and Pitfalls
Francesca Samuel and Thelma D. Gomez-Ferry
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)




IC-10 The Economic Mindset for Translators
Christopher P. Blakeslee
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Most translators, like other humans, want it all, or at least more than they can have: plenty of leisure time, plenty of disposable income, and intellectually satisfying work. What is the best mix? The answer varies among individuals and across time. The speaker will introduce an economic framework—complete with simple mathematical formulas—that will help translators find their own best mix. The speaker will also explore such questions as when to outsource a task and when to do it yourself.


Independent Contractors
Related Sessions

Seminar A Expanding Your Freelance Business, or, Converting It into a Translation Company

K-6 Cultivating a Successful Career as a Korean Interpreter and Translator

LSP-7 Our Euro, Your Peso: The Path Toward Cross-Border Selling in the Translation World

LT-10 Why You Want to Translate on the Mac

Literary Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

L-1 Translating the Funny Parts of a Sad Opera
Mark Herman and Ronnie Apter
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The opera Boris Godunoff, by Modest Musorgskii, chronicles the coronation, tormented reign, and death of Tsar Boris, and is usually regarded as a tragedy. However, Alexander Pushkin's play, the source material for the opera, was originally called a comedy. Musorgskii's operatic adaptation mutes some comic elements but adds others. The translator must be aware of the opera's genesis and preserve such comic characters as the cynical crowd members, drunk vagabond monks, and hopelessly inept policemen. These characters must still fit into an essentially tragic opera, however, and be recognizably cut from the same Russian cloth as Musorgskii's non-comical characters.


L-2 Why Translation Matters (11th Annual Marilyn Gaddis Rose Lecture)
Edith Grossman
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




L-3 The Little Prince in China
Duoxiu Qian
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The translation of children's literature is quite different from the translation of adult literature in terms of subject, theme, plot, linguistic style, rhetorical device, and other aspects. Presented from the perspective of the target reader, the speaker will conduct a descriptive study of five Chinese translations of The Little Prince to highlight the specific characteristics of the translation of children's literature in Chinese. The speaker will discuss the reasons behind certain translation strategies and provide some guidance for future translations in this field.


L-4 Sutras: From the Seductive to the Sublime
Terence M. Coe
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Among the world's literary works, sutras are at once the most concise and comprehensive. Found only in the Sanskrit language, sutras compress vast amounts of meaning into single words and even syllables, making them virtually impossible to translate directly. There are sutras on many topics, ranging from the esoteric to the grammatical to the romantic. Many people have heard of the Kama Sutra, Yoga Sutras, or Heart Sutra. What defines a sutra? This presentation will describe the key aspects of sutras, discuss their principal types, and offer illustrative examples from literature with comparative translations.


L-5 Translating a Play for Production in the Target Language
Enrica J. Ardemagni, Phyllis Zatlin, and Gregary J. Racz
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What does it take to make a translation of a play work in the target language? How do the director and actors work with a translated script, and is this any different from how they would work with an original script? A panel, including a director, actors, editors, and translators, will provide insights on how the process works.


L-6 Literary Division Annual Meeting
Enrica J. Ardemagni
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Literary Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network. During the division meeting, we will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for the year 2010. All division members are encouraged to attend, and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.


L-7 Translations from the French-Speaking Caribbean and Africa
Carrol F. Coates, Marilyn Gaddis Rose, and Rose M. Rejouis
(Saturday, ; All Levels; Presented in: English)




L-8 Two Heads are Better than One: A Literary Translation Story
Tony Beckwith and Liliana Valenzuela
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Literary translators usually work alone. How very different, then, to spend a year working on a project with a partner! The speakers will explain how they jointly translated a book of 73 stories riddled with jokes, puns, plays on words, cultural references, and onomatopoeia. Both translators are also poets and writers: One is a native of Mexico City; The other comes from a British family living in Argentina. They thus formed a harmonious alliance that brought two lifetimes of linguistic and cultural skills to the task.


L-9
Alexander Rainof
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and French)




Literary
Related Sessions

F-8

N-2 Translating the Untranslatable

N-4 Information, Narrative, Dialog, and Verse

Legal T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LAW-1 Legal Translation: Raising the Bar
Steven M. Kahaner, Thomas L. West III, and Alejandro M. Garro
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

Successful legal translation requires competence in at least three different areas: 1) comparative law, including a basic knowledge of the legal systems of both the source and target languages; 2) familiarity with the specific terminology of the particular legal field(s) dealt with in the source and target texts; and 3) the ability to write in the specific legal "style" of the target language. The panelists, all of whom are attorneys, will discuss issues relating to legal translation from their individual perspectives.


LAW-2 Research Techniques for French>English Legal Translation
Cynthia L. Hazelton
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

CHANGE
NEW: 11:30am-12:30pm
OLD: 4:00pm-5:00pm

Legal translation requires highly specialized terminology and an understanding of both the source and target legal systems. The speaker will present a bibliography of source materials on the civil and common law systems. Online and hard copy reference sources and advanced legal research techniques will also be discussed.


LAW-3 Law and Order
Andy Benzo
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English and Spanish)

In the criminal justice system there are two groups representing the people: the police who apprehend the suspect, and the district attorneys who prosecute the offender. The full process of the system in which these groups work will be analyzed, from the commission of the crime until the final sentence is issued by the judge. The different stages of the indictment, arraignment, preliminary hearing, and trial (jury selection, opening arguments, evidence, closing arguments, sentence) will be discussed. This process will be compared with the Napoleonic Code system.


LAW-4 Legal Representation for Low Income Clients: The Role of a Community Translator and Interpreter
Carmina J. Chung and Al Moreno
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

This presentation will highlight the traits that community translators and interpreters develop in a legal setting. It will introduce as well as explain the framework within which the language services unit provides services to attorneys who work for the community. Topics will include the differences between formal legal letters, client statements, and self-help articles, as well as how translation techniques vary depending on the project. This presentation will focus mainly on telephone interpreting, including the development of code switching in simultaneous interpreting. We will also discuss bridging cultural gaps.


LAW-5 Making the Move to Patent Translation
Martin J. Cross
(Saturday, ; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This presentation is geared toward established translators who want to start working in patent translation, or who already translate some patents but want more. The first half will cover the international patent system and explain why people need patents translated. Participants will learn why patents are written in a certain style and why their translation requires a special approach. The second half of the presentation will look at who buys patent translations and how to sell them. Practical issues, including formatting and certification, will also be covered.


LAW-6 The Challenges of Nuremberg and Beyond: Interpreting at International Tribunals II
Nancy Schweda Nicholson
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will examine video interviews and memoirs gathered from Nuremberg Trial interpreters, focusing on the language issues that arose in this specific legal setting. The speaker will discuss present-day interpreting at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Court, comparing the challenges faced by court interpreters then and now.


LAW-7 Improving Your Sight Translation Skills for Court Interpreting and Beyond
Maria G. Entchevitch
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Many interpreters find sight translation difficult, sometimes even distasteful. Many, if they work on their sight translation at all, do it only because it is a prerequisite for the court certification exams. There are ways to learn these skills, however, and learning them will significantly help an individual to develop other interpreting skills. This presentation will cover practical approaches to learning and improving such skills, including those needed to prepare for certification exams. Examples and exercises will be in English. Participants will form groups according to their languages and perform sight translation exercises.


LAW-8 Anatomy of a Patent
Bruce D. Popp
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Understanding the form and structure of patents can help you prepare to translate a patent and to improve your patent translation and terminology research skills. This presentation will focus on U.S. patents as either the translation source or target, with reference to U.S. code and regulation. Some parallel examples will be taken from European and French patents and Patent Cooperation Treaty applications. You will learn how to find bibliographic information that will prove useful for researching terminology, and how to use the structure of a patent to clarify your understanding of the content.


Legal Translation and Interpreting
Related Sessions

Seminar J An Introduction to the U.S. Legal System: Constitutional Issues, Sources of Law, Litigation, and Research

Seminar M Team Interpreting in the Courtroom, the Code of Ethics, and Personal Responsibilities

F-5 The Legal Translator as Investigator

G-4 German>English Patent Translation

I-3 From Asylum Interviews to Immigration Court

I-5 Mental Health Interpreting: Unique Challenges and Practical Solutions

IT-3 Trusts in Italy: A Translator's Point of View

J-1 Discovery: What is It and What is the Role of the Translator?

J-3 Workshop: Translation and Interpreting During the Discovery Process in Civil Litigation

J-5 Translating Patents to/from Japanese

K-1 Translating International Intellectual Property Contracts to/from Korean

K-2 Korean Patent Translation: Collaborative Efforts with the Korean Intellectual Property Office

K-3 Translating International Business Contracts to/from Korean

K-5 Check/Main Interpreting in Commercial Litigation Involving Korean Technology Companies in the U.S.

N-3 A Comparative Look at Swedish and American Legal Systems

SL-1 Translating Legal Text to/from Russian/English

Language Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LT-1 Management for the Localization of Software User Interfaces
Klaus-Dirk Schmitz
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The localization of software products deals with different types of text, such as installation manuals, online help files, packaging and marketing material, websites, and software user interfaces. While the first text types are more or less typical technical texts, the user interface—with menus, dialog boxes, tool tips, and error messages—requires a dedicated approach for terminology management. This presentation will demonstrate terminological phenomena typical of software user interfaces, discuss the value of traditional terminology management for this kind of technical text, and develop a proposal for an adequate terminological data model.


LT-2 Machine Translation Post Editing: A Translator's Friend or Foe?
Rosana N. Wolochwianski
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Machine translation (MT) has introduced a new task in the workflow: post editing MT raw material output. What is expected from the MT post editing task and who should be involved? What might the social consequences of MT post editing be within the translator's community? Should MT post editing be considered a new enemy, or a new job opportunity? Through the revision of specialized studies and live testimonies, the speaker will share her views and encourage debate on this topic.


LT-3 What Do You Tell Your Clients When They Propose Machine Translation?
Laurie M. Gerber
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The presentation will explore the unique strengths of human translators and machine translation (MT) software, and the "care and feeding" required for best results from MT. The presentation will also cover the characteristics of various translation jobs, which can be used to help translators and their clients discuss whether MT should be considered. Some brief sketches of real-world successes (and failures) using MT will be discussed.


LT-4 Translation Support Tools Forum, Part I: Focus on Translation Companies
Alan K. Melby
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This forum will provide an overview of translation technology and brief presentations by conference exhibitors that offer tools for translation companies. Company owners and project managers will become aware of what is currently available in the area of translation management software and will be invited to visit the exhibit area for more information. Individual translators are, of course, welcome at this session about software in support of teamwork.


LT-5 The Importance of Ergonomics for Translators: How to Avoid Repetitive Strain Injuries
Lisa Sattler
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The injuries people sustain from sitting long hours at a computer are usually called repetitive strain injuries. A person may receive one of many diagnoses, including tendinitis and carpal tunnel syndrome. This presentation will discuss the signs and symptoms of more common injuries to help you recognize them before they become severe. It will include information about what you can do to heal or prevent injuries, including detailed ergonomic recommendations, posture training, and stretches.


LT-6 Translation Support Tools Forum, Part II: Focus on Individual Translators
Alan K. Melby
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This forum will provide an overview of translation technology and brief presentations by conference exhibitors that offer tools for individual translators. A handout will be available that includes a set of frequently asked questions—compiled by ATA's Translation and Computers Committee—with answers provided by each participating exhibitor. In this one session, attendees can get up-to-date information on a variety of tools and decide which exhibits to visit for more information.


LT-7 Language Technology Division Annual Meeting
Dierk Seeburg
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Language Technology Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network. During the division meeting, we will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for the year 2010. All division members are encouraged to attend, and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.


LT-8 A Functionalist Approach to Web Localization: A Framework Toward Optimizing Quality
Miguel A. Jimenez-Crespo
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The objective of any Web localization process is to produce a quality website that "looks like it has been produced in-country." This goal is consistent with functionalist approaches to translation. This presentation will review the global Web localization process from a functionalist perspective in order to provide translators/localizers with a practical and theoretical framework to improve the quality of any localized website. Among others, practical uses of Web corpora will be presented as a tool to check the "naturalness" and quality of localized websites.


LT-9 Making Portable Document Format Files Work for You
Tuomas S. Kostiainen and Jill R. Sommer
(Saturday, ; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Translators encounter portable document format (PDF) files daily in various situations, but are often unable to utilize these files and the associated programs fully. This presentation will demonstrate various commercial and shareware tools that enable us to create and manipulate PDF files. Adobe Acrobat-related topics will include a comparison of various versions of Acrobat; editing and commenting in PDF files; creating and filling electronic forms; and using electronic signatures. We will also show how to convert PDF files with optical character recognition tools to MS Word format for translation in translation environment tools, and how to create translation memories from PDF files using LogiTerm AlignFactory.


LT-10 Why You Want to Translate on the Mac
Dierk Seeburg
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

CHANGE
NEW: Dierk Seeburg
OLD: Fredrik Stenshamn

This presentation will give an overview of freelance translation on the Mac platform and include several examples. It will cover keeping track of clients, e-mail management, invoicing, networking, automating tasks, maintaining secure backups, marketing your services online, delivering large files to a client—oh, and a few things about translating as well. Other topics will include what translation tools are available for Mac, how they work, and what your options are if you absolutely have to use Windows for a project.


LT-11 Learn from Terminology Standards: Setting Up a Practical Terminology Management Solution
Klaus-Dirk Schmitz
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

International terminology standards such as ISO 16642 (TMF), ISO 12620 (DatCats), and ISO 30042 (TBX), as well as established best practices, provide a set of principles and methods for setting up a terminology management system. The language and translation departments of huge industrial companies and public organizations are not the only ones who can benefit from these guidelines. Small language services providers and freelance translators should also make use of this professional know-how. This presentation will give a short theoretical overview of terminology management, explain basic design principles and typical data categories for termbases, and show how terminology management systems can be used to support translators.


LT-12 Arabic and Chinese Desktop Publishing: Tips and Tricks for Translators
Louay M. Abdulla and Ming-huai Hall
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This presentation will address the common issues encountered by Arabic and Chinese translators when using desktop publishing and design software. Particular emphasis will be given to a discussion of the issues involved when typesetting Chinese and Arabic text in Adobe InDesign and MS Publisher. It will provide translators with technical tips and timesaving hints. This information may also be useful to other right-to-left and character-based language translators who need to use InDesign or Publisher.


LT-13 The Case for Not Using Translation Memory
Josephine Bacon
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translation memory (TM) may be useful to agencies and corporations working on large documents and for localization, but it is positively harmful to individual translators. This is due to the expense involved, especially on training and upgrades, and to the fact that TM gets a translator into bad habits. The speaker will demonstrate a system for speeding up translation work.


Language Technology
Related Sessions

Seminar U Free and Open Source Software for Translators

A-1 Arabic on Free and Open Source Software

LSP-5 Working With the U.S. Government

SL-2 Noob No Longer: Making the Most of Internet Resources in Translation

S-2

Medical T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

MED-1 Informed Consent and Professional Interpreting Services
Elizabeth Abraham
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speakers will discuss how not using professional interpreters can lead to serious ethical issues in patient care, such as failing to obtain informed consent to treatment and personal care. Particularly when family members act as interpreters, there is a tendency to filter the information provided to patients, usually out of a desire to "protect" them from negative information. Even when a professional interpreter is present, it is not uncommon for family members to dismiss the interpreter from visits where diagnosis or consent to treatment is the subject of discussion with a care provider. The speakers will outline strategies for health care professionals in responding to this challenge.


MED-2 Critical Communication Care
Orlando Gonzalez
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Latino immigrants add a unique flavor to the language of medicine. Transparent communication with the patient and family members is essential to properly triage, assess, and diagnose medical conditions. A clear contextual understanding of the patient's cultural medical expressions by national origin will complement the provider's medical language. This bilingual workshop (English/Spanish) will cover both the language of medicine at the provider's level as well as the patient's medical colloquial expressions, semantic interpretations, and linguistic idiosyncrasies in different Latin American countries. Participants will also learn to identify and avoid general and medical false cognates.


MED-3 Bioethical Issues in Translation: Informed Consent
Eric S. Bullington
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

This presentation will examine ethical issues in the translation of informed consent forms and related documents. The bioethical foundations of informed consent and its basic elements will be discussed. Participants will then review the contexts in which informed consent forms are translated, including surgery, pharmacotherapeutics, and clinical research. The concept of register as applied to informed consent forms will be addressed in detail, with examples of appropriate and inappropriate register in English, French, and Spanish. Finally, best practices in the translation of informed consent will be discussed, including design/layout, word choice, and readability.


MED-4 Is There a Clarifier in the House? Error Analysis and Correction While Interpreting in Clinical Settings
Armando Ezquerra Hasbun
(Saturday, ; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The medical interpreter is the only party in an interpreted clinical session who is able to notice and intervene to correct misunderstandings between patients and providers. After reviewing the roles of the interpreter, we will see how one can learn to anticipate, detect, identify, and correct common linguistic and cultural errors. We will then expand on how an interpreter can verify comprehension at any time while honoring the principle of transparency. Finally, we will review the protocols and proper phraseology for intervening to optimize clinical outcomes for limited-English-proficient patients, their families, and their providers.


MED-5 CANCELLED
Medical Division Annual Meeting
Mary Esther Diaz
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




MED-6 The Role of Medical Interpreters in Patient-Centered Care
Milena Savova, Ariel Lenarduzzi, Angie Yong, Seydou Sow, and Ellen Gayama
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The growing diversification of the U.S. population presents challenges to providing quality health care for all. The medical interpreter must play several roles: conduit for information between the patient and health care provider; clarifier of information for the patient, health care provider, and loved ones; cultural broker to "translate" different traditions, preferences, values, and lifestyles; and advocate for patent-centered care. The panel will address training to meet the cultural and advocacy challenges of medical interpreting. Topics will include meeting patient needs at different stages of development (i.e., geriatric versus pediatric), as well as effective communication to educate and empower patients for self-care and monitoring.


MED-7 The ABCs of Medical Translation: Strategies to Identify, Translate, and Manage Acronyms and Abbreviations
Erin M. Lyons
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Abbreviations, acronyms, and the quasi-legible scribbles of doctors are the medical translator's daily bread; however, deciphering and researching these words, as well as maintaining terminology databases, can lead to productivity black holes. This presentation will provide a variety of resources and strategies for managing the translation of these troublesome three- and four-letter words more effectively. It will also address related issues, such as handling texts with interwoven English and non-English acronyms and abbreviations and the appropriate use of Latin- and Greek-derived medical jargon. Emphasis will also be placed on storing and leveraging terminology in a low-maintenance, user-friendly format.


Medical Translation and Interpreting
Related Sessions

G-6 Getting a Grip on German>English Medical Translation

I-5 Mental Health Interpreting: Unique Challenges and Practical Solutions

I-8 Sight Translation and Written Translation by Interpreters: New Guidelines

J-2 The Clinical Study Protocol for Japanese Translators

SL-5 Pharmaceuticals for Slavists

Science & Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ST-1 Translating Science into Dreams: Marketing Translations for the Beauty Care and Cosmetic Industry
Agnes E. M. Meilhac
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

New scientific discoveries and technological innovations drive sales in the beauty care market. The latest concepts in science are used by public relations professionals and industry brands to build effective advertising campaigns and formulate captivating pitches for cutting-edge beauty products. New product introductions give rise to a carefully constructed phraseology replete with neologisms, buzzwords, catch phrases, and specialized jargon intended to win the hearts and purses of beauty product consumers. This presentation will examine the translator's role in recreating the "scientific parlance" that makes these products accessible and desirable. Examples of typical documents in the field will be provided for discussion.


ST-2 What Would I Learn if I Spent a Day in a Chemistry Laboratory?
Karen M. Tkaczyk, Ph.D.
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

If we could actually see how something was done in the laboratory, wouldn't it make more sense? In this presentation, we will spend time in the quality assurance laboratory of a pharmaceutical manufacturing plant. We will learn about common analytical chemistry techniques (e.g., sampling), equipment (e.g., spectrometers), and methods (e.g., chromatography). For clarity, we will see photographs and hear explanations of how things work, why they are used, and what they are called. The speaker's aim is to help translators understand their chemical texts better.


ST-3 Oil and Gas Operations and Technology
Steven Marzuola
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

This presentation will introduce participants to operations and terminology used in the oil and gas industry. It will cover the background and context for documents presented for translation, with a focus on terms whose meanings are different from general usage. Other topics will include an overview of the methods that have been used to find and extract oil and gas; the techniques used by oil geologists before the advent of today's seismic and geophysical techniques; rotary drilling, downhole turbines, directional and horizontal drilling, well servicing, and workover operations; the fundamental requirements for the accumulation of hydrocarbon deposits; and the stages of production.


Science & Technology
Related Sessions

Seminar G SAP: An Overview of the Company and Its Software

Seminar R

G-1 The World of SAP: Software and Translation

S-7 Terminology of Crude Oil Refining Processes and Their Product Yield

Training and Pedagogy
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TP-1 Standards and the University Translation Studies Curriculum
Elizabeth Lowe McCoy, Gerhard Budin, Sue Ellen Wright, and Alan K. Melby
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

In this presentation, we will address recent ASTM standards for quality assurance in translation, as well as EN 15038 and ISO 704. We will examine the relevance of these issues for translator training, using intended learning outcomes as a means of formulating the connections between the current state of the language services industry and the professionalization element in university translation degree programs. We will suggest ways that academic programs in translation can align standards with the curriculum, particularly in terminology, translation practice, localization, project management, and tools courses.


TP-2 The Role of Internships in Translation and Interpreter Training
Miguel A. Jimenez-Crespo, Hank Dallmann, Al Moreno, Beatriz Viera, and
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Current research in translation and interpreting competence reveals a subset of professional skills that cannot be fully developed in a classroom setting, which has led to an increasing number of internships in the U.S., primarily in medical, community, and legal contexts. This presentation will discuss the necessary cooperation between institutions and the language industry, and the roles and responsibilities of all the participating agents. Representatives from all sides of the internship cycle at Rutgers University will discuss their systematic approach based on current research. This presentation will also discuss guidelines, experiences, learning goals, and future prospects of this expanding trend.


TP-3 Real-World Scenarios in the Educational Training of Translators
Lisa Link
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In the professional field of technical translation, the use of information and communication technology has taken on an increasingly important role. The work on large-scale translation projects is often carried out in virtual teams. The Flensburg University of Applied Sciences and the University of Hildesheim have teamed up to offer their students first-hand practical experience in Internet-based cooperative work in translation. This presentation will elaborate on the details of implementing this simulated real-world scenario in translation education.


TP-4 Different Approaches to Interpreter Training
Reynaldo J. Pagura, Jayme Costa Pinto, and Gloria R. L. Sampaio
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will discuss several possible approaches to the teaching of interpreting, which can be useful not only for the training and self-practice of conference interpreters, but also for interpreters working in different settings. These approaches include sight translation, listening for sense, consecutive as a stepping stone for simultaneous interpreting, and split-attention exercises. There will be some (limited) opportunities for practice involving interpreting from and into English, Portuguese, French, and Spanish using the approaches discussed, thus allowing for practice into/from the "A" and "B" languages of participants.


TP-5 Teaching Translation and Interpreting Skills to High School Students
Courtney Searls-Ridge
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The translation and interpreting program at the Puget Sound Skills Center near Seattle, Washington, trains high school students to use their language skills as interpreters at social and informational school events. In a self-reinforcing process, as their English and heritage-language skills improve, students see themselves becoming increasingly competent and useful, and they work to improve their language skills even more. The program encourages students to direct their energies toward careers utilizing their language ability, motivates them to continue language studies beyond high school, and prepares them for entry-level interpreter certification. The speaker will share the history, successes, and challenges of this innovative program.


TP-6 Professionalizing a Gray Market Through Education: Setting Up an Undergraduate Translation and Interpreting Program from Scratch
Monica D. Reynoso
(Saturday, ; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will discuss a liberal arts-based undergraduate translation and interpreting (T&I) program that has had a nationwide impact in the professional, educational, and entrepreneurial communities. Professionalizing the longstanding informal T&I practice while developing a viable career program for language-oriented talented individuals amidst a myriad of other attractive 21st-century options at the Universidad de Especialidades Espiritu Santo in Guayaquil, Ecuador, is not the only challenge. Topics will include the multilevel contexts of the program, student population, and the program's main/unique features, competencies, and competitive advantages. The program's goals, its impact on the community, and the social responsibility of trainees will also be discussed.


TP-7 Directionalities in Translation: Way(s) to Go
, Marella Feltrin-Morris, Maria C. Guzman, and Marko J. Miletich
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English)

Directionality in translation is conventionally considered in reference to language pairs and the affiliation of a translator to the language he or she is translating from or into. This notion, however, is not unproblematic, and debate can be expanded toward disparate conceptual territories, such as pedagogy and professional practice (language directionality: translating into one's "native" or "foreign" language), gender directionality (male translating female authors and vice versa), sociolinguistic directionality (translating from or into a minority language), or sociopolitical directionality (translating from or to dominant or subaltern cultures). This panel presentation will discuss these and other aspects of directionality.


TP-8 Winning the RACE: Embracing e-Learning and Embarking on an e-Course in Translation
Susan Yun Xu
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In the world of high technology, e-learning is not an option but a necessity. This presentation will make participants think about the opportunities that technology brings for translators and their educators, and its educational return. Topics include: designing an e-course; translating technical writings with technology; and changing attitudes toward e-development, namely, RACE: resistance to e-learning and resentment toward the project. A lively demonstration of how teaching translation can be made simple, interesting, and engaging through e-learning will be given.


Training and Pedagogy
Related Sessions

Seminar B Beyond 40 Hours: Matching Extended Training with Interpreter Needs

LSP-8 Leave It to the Pros: Translation Project Management as a Profession

Terminology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TERM-1 Managing Terminology on Your Own Terms
Rachel Polakoff and Jason F. Kopp
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Although a properly organized termbase is one of the most effective ways to increase quality and productivity, few language services providers manage terminology consistently. Who has time to extract terminology, generate termbases, translate, vet, and distribute term lists; not to mention solve the occasional snag, software glitch, or incompatibility issue? The U.S. Department of State's Office of Language Services (LS) has developed a terminology management workflow using SDL MultiTerm. The speakers will show how LS project coordinators have learned to manage terminology.


TERM-2 Modeling Terminology to Meet Your Needs: When You Don't Have the Time Not to Do It
Sue Ellen Wright
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Beginner/Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Careful terminology management saves money and ensures high quality for individual translators, agencies, and organizations, but terminology management tools demand data modeling choices that pose challenges to first-time users. ISO standards spell out best practices, but they may seem too complicated to understand. This presentation offers a highly accessible sliding scale of complexity designed to meet the long-term needs of a variety of operating environments in order to achieve the most effective return for your efforts.


Terminology
Related Sessions

LT-11 Learn from Terminology Standards: Setting Up a Practical Terminology Management Solution

MED-7 The ABCs of Medical Translation: Strategies to Identify, Translate, and Manage Acronyms and Abbreviations

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