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Sessions by Language
Select a language below to see the sessions offered:

dvd This symbol indicates which sessions are included in the ATA eConference.


A Arabic C Chinese F French
G German IT Italian J Japanese
K Korean N Nordic Languages P Portuguese
S Spanish SL Slavic Languages




Arabic
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A-1 Strategies in Arabic>English Translation
Stuart D. Sears
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will discuss the basic methodologies in Arabic>English translation. The speaker will discuss examples of common problems that translators encounter, ranging from broad linguistic and cultural differences between Arabic and English to the particular nuances of different genres. Solutions to these problems will be proposed and evaluated. The speaker will also introduce and explain the basic applicable concepts of translation theory.


Chinese
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C-1 The Issue of Collocation When Translating Official Chinese Documents into English
Zhesheng Cheng
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will focus on the problem of finding linguistic elements in English that ostensibly correspond to their counterparts in the Chinese text, resulting in English translations marred by ambiguous wording. The "expressive" approach to translation should be replaced by a "communicative" approach that emphasizes the linguistic bonds between the writer (translator) and the English reader. The speaker will use a theoretic elaboration to discuss the distinction between these two approaches to translation. Also included will be an analysis of specific examples relating to various types of collocations in the English translation of official Chinese documents.


C-2 Exploring Chinese-English Interpreting Techniques
Liping Zhao and Yian Yang
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Chinese)

There is a growing demand for Chinese>English interpreting. This has always been one of the most daunting language pairs. Topics to be covered will include an introduction to quality standards and benchmarks for self-improvement, as well as detailed discussions on linear interpreting, cultural elements, long sentence segmentation, passive voice, number conversion, and time position.


C-3 Translating United Nations Documents into Chinese, Part I: Organization and Operation
Bok Kow Tsim
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




C-4 Translating United Nations Documents into Chinese, Part II: Challenges and Solutions
Bok Kow Tsim
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)




C-5 Chinese Language Division Annual Meeting
Bin Liu
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Chinese Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network. We will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2012. All division members are encouraged to attend and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.


C-6 Chinese Sensitivities in Language and Visual Choices
Hua (Barbara) Y. Robinson
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English and Mandarin)

Like every culture, Chinese culture contains certain customs and taboos. Being conscious of these sensitivities will serve to highlight a translator's respect and understanding of the Chinese community, and help to establish understanding among different cultures. The presenter will give an overview of cultural sensitivities in the Chinese language, including those associated with images.


C-7 Introduction to Gaming Translation
Huilin Gao
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Mandarin)




C-8 Nuts and Bolts in Chinese<>English Translation II: Dealing with the Parts of Speech
Yuanxi Ma and Di Wu
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This is a continuation of the presentation given at last year's Annual Conference in Denver. Participants will revisit the English grammar rules regarding parts of speech, adjectives and their attributive forms and functions, and idioms and proverbs. The discussion will include translation challenges and possible solutions (with examples).


C-9 Translating Chinese Plant and Animal Names
Jeffrey A. Keller
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Terminology specific to plants and animals tends to show up in documents when least expected. Since many plants and animals native to China do not have native equivalents in the West, translation can be tricky. This presentation will provide some strategies and resources for translation and a basic introduction on how to handle scientific nomenclature. Traditional Chinese medicine will be mentioned, but it will not be the main focus of the presentation.


Chinese
Related Sessions

G-12 The China Trilogy: A Bilingual Reading and Discussion

L-7 Translations of Eastern Religious Texts: Tradition for Working Translators

ST-8 How Did Japan and China Each Emulate Front-Running Western Technology

French
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F-1 No More Anomalies and Absurdities in French!

(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: French)

Have you noticed something missing in your life lately? Some French accents on letters are disappearing! Chances are some of the texts you've worked on in recent years used the new official spelling, which targets about 2,000 of the 60,000 most common words. This spelling, along with new grammatical rules, aims to modernize French writing. Many institutions and countless grammar books, dictionaries, style guides, and websites have already made the jump. What about you? The presenter will introduce the latest changes in spelling and grammar and include some practical exercises to help you come to grips with these important changes.


F-2 Good News/Bad News: Translating Press Releases from French>English
Thomas L. West III
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The presenter will examine the language of press releases in French, focusing on typical French phrases and vogue expressions that are difficult to translate into English. The presenter will discuss the noun/verb collocations that make writing sound natural in English and look for ways to transform vague French into strong English. Participants will be asked to propose translations for difficult sentences and will be offered suggestions.


F-3 French Language Division Annual Meeting
Bruce D. Popp
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and French)

We will discuss the status and direction of the French Language Division. Relevant topics include the state of the division, contributions to the blog, identifying speakers for 2012 in San Diego, the nominating committee for 2012 administrator elections, and continuity of division leadership.


F-4
Alexander Rainof
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: French)




F-5 Mistakes in Legal Translation: What Consequences?

(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: French)

A simple translation error is said to have accelerated the drop of the bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. While most translation mistakes have far less serious consequences, using the wrong word can sometimes prove costly. Drawing examples from a variety of documents—from UN Resolution 242 and the 1929 Warsaw Convention to selected judgments of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and U.S. Miranda warnings—the speaker will discuss the consequences of mistranslation in the legal field. While careful word choice is important, the fear of getting it wrong should not be a hurdle.


F-6 Translating for Quebec
Grant Hamilton
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE
NEW: Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm
OLD: Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm

Quebec is a huge potential market for English translators of French, but also a minefield for those who approach the market unprepared. This presentation will serve as a quick "heads up" on translation points to keep in mind when working into English with Quebec clients, or with Canadian clients in general. There will also be points of interest for those who work into French, although the presentation will not serve as a primer on Canadian French per se.


F-7 CANCELLED
La traduction de la poesie, complexites analytiques et prosodiques
Bonaventure Balla Omgba
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: French)




French
Related Sessions

SEM-D Translating Administrative/Government French>English

S-8 The Organization of American States: The Role of In-House Translators

TRM-2 Search-fu! Finding Terminology on the Internet

German
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G-1 German for Professionals
Jan-Philipp Sendker
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: German)

Good writing is both a gift and a craft. The gift is a matter of talent; the craft demands skill. Talent can be polished through sustained effort and the skills required can be learned. The presenter will provide step-by-step instructions on how to write a high-quality text from scratch. In the process, he will explain the most common mistakes many of us make and how to avoid them. This presentation will be conducted in German, but non-native speakers are also welcome!


G-2 Taking ATA's English>German Certification Exam, Part I: Understanding the Principles and Their Impact on Strategy and Grading
Jutta Diel-Dominique and Susanne Lauscher
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and German)

The presenters will first explain the general nature and purpose of ATA's certification exam. Particular emphasis will be on using the translation instructions as guiding principles for the evaluation of the exam and their impact on macro- and micro-level decisions. The speakers will also suggest general strategies for preparing for the exam. Participants are encouraged to submit their questions to the presenters (juttadd@estreet.com or susanne.lauscher@wanadoo.fr) before the conference.


G-3 Taking ATA's English>German Certification Exam, Part II: Strategies for Success
Susanne Lauscher and Jutta Diel-Dominique
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and German)

Attendees will receive a sample of a general text passage. They will be asked to formulate translation instructions, do a general text analysis of the sample text, and name what they perceive to be translation challenges. The presenters will give advice on how to work these elements into a macro- and micro-level strategy for translating the sample text.


G-4 Translating and Localizing Patient Information: Challenges and Solutions
Maria Rosdolsky and Susanne Lauscher
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate/Advanced; Presented in: English and German)

When translating and localizing patient information, the translator works under two sets of constraints. First, the translator has to act as a mediator between the client, the translation agency, and the user. Second, the process of localizing patient information and the finished product are subject to industry-specific norms and regulations. The presenters will provide some background on these industry norms and regulations. Using translations into German as examples, they will point out the translation dilemmas and contradictions that arise, in particular from back translation. Possible solutions to make the translation process smoother and its outcome more satisfactory will be suggested.


G-5 Formal But Fluent: Style and Register in Translations of German Financial Reports
Robin Bonthrone
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Although there seem to be plenty of seminars, presentations, and articles on how to write good financial communication texts, questions about style and register in more formal German financial/legal text genres (e.g., notes to financial statements, accounting policies, and management reports) have been largely ignored. When can we use the passive voice? How closely do we have to stick to the structure of the source text? Should we prefer "foreignization" to "domestication"? Does substance always lead form? This presentation will describe some of the problems and offer solutions to these and related issues using examples from published German financial reports and their translations.


G-6 Translating German<>English in the Renewables Sector: A Theoretical Overview
Craig Morris
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What are "green" translations? This presentation will provide an overview of the different technologies behind wind power, solar, and biomass, as well as efficiency, fuel cells, and batteries. The presenter will focus on German<>English translation because of the unique challenges involved. Although much of the renewable technology is from Germany, the terminology has yet to enter dictionaries. In addition, renewable technology largely depends upon government policy, which is fundamentally different between the U.S. and Germany. Attendees will gain an understanding of the challenges involved with translating in this sector.


G-7 Translating Standard Operating Procedures
Maia Costa
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Standard operating procedures (SOPs) are a type of technical documentation found worldwide in almost every industry. However, the conventions for writing them vary greatly from one language to the next. When translating SOPs from German into English, translators must often adapt major textual elements such as voice, mood, tense, and syntax. This presentation will provide an overview of this text type, its communicative purpose, and its main stylistic and linguistic features. Using examples from the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry, the presenter will offer tips and strategies for translating SOPs from German into English.


G-8 Overview of the Changes the "Bologna Process" has Brought to Germany's Higher Education System
Ulrike Walter-Lipow
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: German)

Over the past 10 years, the German higher education system has undergone a profound, and often controversial, process of change. This presentation will provide an overview of these changes and introduce and explain key terminology. It will touch on the controversial points and answer the question of whether the new German bachelor's and master's degrees are comparable to U.S. degrees. The presentation is targeted at everyone who left the German higher educational system more than 10 years ago (or never was a part of it) and wants to understand the significant changes that have occurred.


G-9 German Language Division Annual Meeting
Ruth A. Gentes Krawczyk
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The German Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other German translators and interpreters. Participants will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2012. All division members are encouraged to attend and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.


G-10 Editing: An Art Form
Jan-Philipp Sendker
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: German)

Improving a text through editing is an important part of the writing process. At the same time, it is a delicate task that requires special skills. The presenter will use a few excerpts from different types of texts to illustrate how it is possible to improve a text without completely rewriting it. He will provide detailed explanations of the editing process for each excerpt. It is often the small things that make all the difference! This presentation will be conducted in German, but non-native speakers are also welcome.


G-11 False Friends: "Slippage" and the Peculiar Use of English in German-Language Texts
Linda L. Gaus, Rainer Klett, Nina Sattler-Hovdar, and Trisha A. Kovacic-Young
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The use of English words in German texts has become increasingly common in recent years. However, there often seems to be "slippage" between what native German speakers think a particular English term means and what native English speakers believe to be the case. This panel discussion will introduce some of the panelists' favorite "false friends." Participants will be invited to determine the extent and nature of the "slippage" and then find the most appropriate translations for these words.


G-12 The China Trilogy: A Bilingual Reading and Discussion
Linda A. Marianiello and Jan-Philipp Sendker
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and German)

Novelist Jan-Philipp Sendker and literary translator Linda Marianiello have collaborated on extensive sample translations of his China Trilogy for the publisher, Random House-DE. In this bilingual reading, they will present selected passages from the first two books, Whispering Shadows and Dragon Games. Brief introductions will place each excerpt in context and introduce tricky passages that present translation challenges. After each excerpt, the presenters will take questions from participants. Conducted in both German and English, this reading is open to all with an interest in literary translation.


German
Related Sessions

SEM-K Translating German<>English in the Renewables Sector

LSP-10 Risks and Opportunities in Insurance Translation

Italian
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IT-1 Retranslation of Classics for an Authentic Reading Experience
Tim Parks
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Italian)

The presenter will discuss the reasons for retranslating the classical texts of the past, focusing on Machiavelli's The Prince. Examining lexical and syntactical problems, the presenter will describe how previous translations both help and hinder and how the reputation of such a famous text can lead translators to play to readers' expectations, rather than concentrating on what the author actually wrote. The presentation will focus on the pitfalls of rigorously faithful retranslations that, while offering a more provocative and stylistically interesting text, expose the reader's predilection for the domesticated, easy-to-read, older version (with examples of Dostoevsky into English and Hemingway into Italian).


IT-2 Italian Language Division Annual Meeting
Francesca Marchei and Roberto Crivello
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: Italian)

The Italian Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other Italian translators and interpreters. During the division meeting, we will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2012. All division members are encouraged to attend, and non-members are invited to come learn more about the Italian Language Division.


IT-3 Style in Translation
Tim Parks
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Italian)

Consider the translation of style in relation to the more general translation issue of text and context. Culture-specific material can create difficulties in translation, but it is rarely recognized that style is also specific to culture, depending for its effects on the context and forms of discourse of the source language. This presentation will examine the future for literary style and its translation in a world where much literature aspires to be immediately international, if not global. What is the context of styles for an author who has a global audience in mind, and what are the implications for translation?


IT-4 Class Action (Italian Style)
Barbara Arrighetti
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Italian)

A new judicial remedy has been introduced into the Italian legal system by Finance Law n. 244 of December 24, 2007. The new remedy commonly referring to Italian-style class action is called "azione collettiva risarcitoria" or "collective damages action." From this starting point, the presentation will provide a brief overview of the main differences between U.S. and Italian class action frameworks, focusing on several linguistic issues of specific interest to translators.


IT-5 How to Read a Prospectus: A Guide for English<>Italian Translators
Francesca Marchei and Barbara Arrighetti
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Italian)

If you have always wondered what NAV stands for, are curious to discover the difference between switch and conversion, or need to be sure about whether to use quote or azioni when translating documents relating to an investment scheme, then this presentation is designed for you. After an introduction to the basic concepts you need to read and understand an investment scheme prospectus, whether full or simplified, the presenter will put your knowledge to test with actual practice translations (English<>Italian) on the subject, with excerpts from real documents.


Italian
Related Sessions

LSP-9 Filtering the Reviser's Bias: An Econometric Approach to the Fair Assessment of Translators' Performance in Banca d'Italia

Japanese
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J-1 A Guide to the Scientific and Medical Fields for Japanese Translators
Matthew F. Schlecht
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation will survey topics in the scientific and medical fields, covering texts and website content in research, development, manufacturing, and clinical work. Examples of source Japanese documents will be used to outline strategies for producing target English texts that read like originals. Resources will be offered for refining and harmonizing terminology and style, and the discussion will cover concepts such as chromatography, chemical nomenclature, clinical trials, crystallization, distillation, and chemical and biochemical apparatus from the laboratory and hospital room to the manufacturing site.


J-2 Japanese Patents: The Good, the Bad, and the Gorgeous
Jon C. Johanning
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The demand for translations of Japanese patents in many fields of technology is consistently high, and many translators are interested in pursuing this line of work. However, there are many special problems with these source texts, due to the rather unusual style in which they are written as well as the technical terminologies and modes of expression with which one has to deal. The presenter will give examples of some of the problems he has encountered recently and explain how he dealt with them, including the use of computer-aided translation software.


J-3 Free Intellectual Property Translation Resources
James Phillips
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Upon entering the field of intellectual property translation, there is often confusion about aspects such as how various documents should be translated or what terminology should be used. A detailed account will be given of information and resources freely available to translators, where it can be found, and how it can best be used to ensure translations of the highest quality.


J-4 A Good Interpreting Gig: Opening Japan in 1853
Christopher L. Field
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In 1853, the U.S. resolved to open Japan's ports, closed for 300 years to all but the Dutch. Commodore Perry was a formidable Navy envoy, prepared to awe the Japanese with firepower and a dazzling array of technical and cultural demonstrations. But little thought was given to language. His lead interpreter spoke only Chinese (close enough?), but Perry had the wit to also recruit a Dutch speaker, and the negotiations that opened Japan were conducted in an odd hybrid of English, Dutch, Japanese, Chinese, and a bit of French. This presentation will provide a closer look at a great moment in interpreting history.


J-5 Current Topics in the Scientific and Medical Research Fields for Japanese Translators
Matthew F. Schlecht
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This presentation builds upon the session "A Guide to the Scientific and Medical Fields for Japanese Translators." It is intended to acquaint Japanese<>English translators with some of the most recent scientific and medical content. Participants will be provided with tips on how to gain enough familiarity to craft cogent translations that are acceptable to specialists in the field. Topics will be selected from current trade publications, governmental or private industrial websites, and scholarly articles.


J-6 Japanese<>English Certification Workshop
Akiko Sasaki-Summers, Kendrick J. Wagner, Manako Ihaya, David R. Newby, Satoko Nielsen, Connie Prener, Izumi Suzuki, and Miyo M. Tat
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Japanese)

This workshop will provide a brief overview of ATA's certification process, testing procedures, and grading standards. Participants will work through either a Japanese or English passage that is similar to the general passage on ATA's certification exam. Graders in ATA's Certification Program will lead workshop groups and provide feedback on participants' translations.


J-7 Japanese Language Division Annual Meeting
Courtney M. MacNab
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Japanese Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other Japanese translators and interpreters. During the division meeting, we will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2012. All division members are encouraged to attend, and non-members are invited to come learn more about the Japanese Language Division.


J-8 Automotive/Manufacturing Interpreting
Izumi Suzuki
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English and Japanese)

Based on over 30 years of experience in interpreting for all major U.S. and Japanese car manufacturers, as well as suppliers and associations, the presenter will discuss the requirements for an automotive interpreter. She will also talk about interpreting in various manufacturing environments from quality control/equipment maintenance viewpoints. Participants will learn some specialized vocabulary and idioms used frequently in the industry, as well as some techniques to improve consecutive interpreting skills (such as quick word interpreting for verbal reflexes and note-taking skills for memory triggers and mental organization). Questions are welcome at the end of the presentation.


J-9 This Doesn't Make Sense! Are They Careless, Illogical, or What?
Michio Tsutsui
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

When translating Japanese passages into English, we occasionally encounter cases in which our translations do not read logically even though the original Japanese passages are natural and no information is missing in the translation. To explain why this happens, two hypotheses will be presented concerning the ways the Japanese process sentences in Japanese: 1) that Japanese people tolerate information gaps in language and commonly "stack" unlinked information to be resolved later; and 2) that when an information gap occurs, it is usually the reader who is expected to fill it. These hypotheses will be examined using a variety of examples.


J-10 Game Translation for Newbies
Alexander O. Smith
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

This presentation, given by a Japanese>English translator with 14 years of experience in video game translation, will consist of two parts. First, we will take a practical look at what translating (or "localizing") a game entails, covering technical skills such as familiarization, file management, and voice scripting, as well as the "art" of entertainment translation (a.k.a. "knowing when to write it yourself."). The second part of the presentation will include a brief overview of the game translation industry (both Japanese>English and other language pairs) and some advice for aspiring game translators looking to break into the field. Bring your questions!


J-11 Japanese Translation Programs in the U.S.
James L. Davis, Tanya Sobieski Pound, and Michio Tsutsui
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

University programs for Japanese translators must deal with the same issues that confront any budding translator, but the instruction must be customized to deal with the specific characteristics of Japanese. The differences between Japanese and English in terms of grammar, sentence structure, and document organization require special attention. Several different approaches for educating Japanese translators exist, depending on the scope of the program, the degree of specificity of the content, and the methodology to be employed. Representatives from three established university programs will describe the unique features of their respective programs for educating translators who work with Japanese.


J-12 Necessary Editing Skills for Japanese Voice-Overs and Subtitles
Hiro Tsuchiya
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Japanese)

Voice-over and subtitle translations require extensive editing in order to fit the translation into a limited timing window. Translations are frequently shortened and only key statements are retained. The presenter has been performing Japanese voice-overs for over 20 years with script translation and subtitles for various industries. Participants will learn the fundamentals of on-screen subtitles and how to develop time-edited script translation for voice-over. The presenter will demonstrate voice-over with various samples.


Japanese
Related Sessions

L-7 Translations of Eastern Religious Texts: Tradition for Working Translators

LT-4 Information Security for the Freelance Translator

ST-8 How Did Japan and China Each Emulate Front-Running Western Technology

Korean
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

K-1 Korean>English Patent Translation Workshop
Rachel S. Park
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Korean)

The demand for Korean>English patent translators is on the rise as the number of Korean companies filing for international patent applications increases. This presentation will examine the essential skills required to produce accurate Korean>English patent translation. Common pitfalls and errors will be discussed with examples. Participants will also have the opportunity to analyze a Korean text and produce a sample translation. Useful resources for Korean>English patent translators will also be introduced.


K-2 Legal Interpreting: Certification and Beyond
Vania H. Haam
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Korean)

There is a high demand for competent legal interpreters, but very few successfully obtain court certification, the key credential for courtroom work. The need is acute in areas with limited resources, such as Korean. This presentation will address key questions regarding court certification and beyond. What are the essential skills? What does it take to pass the difficult court certification exam and perform successfully in a fast-paced, tense environment? The presenter has worked as a certified court interpreter for over a decade. She will draw on her experience in the certification process, as well as time spent teaching and mentoring newcomers to the profession.


K-3 Korean Language Division Annual Meeting
Vania H. Haam
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Korean Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other Korean translators and interpreters. During the division meeting, we will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2012. All division members are encouraged to attend, and non-members are invited to come learn more about the Korean Language Division.


K-4 CANCELLED
Lexicographer in Desperation, Translator in Desperation
Heejae Lee
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: Korean)




K-5 CANCELLED
Translating Korean<>English Bilingual Texts
D. Bannon
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




K-6 CANCELLED
Some Strategies for English>Korean Translation
Heejae Lee
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: Korean)




K-7 CANCELLED
Tonality and Pacing in Korean Subtitle Translation
D. Bannon
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




K-8 Sul Lung: Cold or Corny? A Look at Korean Slang
Davi "David" Kim
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Korean)

Slang and idiomatic expressions are not considered standard in a language, since all age groups and demographics use them. This presentation will discuss the challenges Korean linguists face in dealing with the ever-changing lexicon of words and phrases. The setting, role (interpreting/translating), and other factors determine the output in the target language. While the linguist may have to worry less about the connotative message in technical passages, everyday conversations and those involving artistic language (music, poetry, etc.) require the ability to convey the connotative message. Similarities and differences between slang, cursing, and colloquialisms in Korean will also be discussed.


K-9 NEW SESSION
Korean Language Certification Meeting
Vania H. Haam
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Korean Language Division has completed the collection of names and information required to submit the application to begin the ATA Certification process for new language combinations. As the KLD is moving forward to establish a certification committee and grader workgroups, questions will be answered by ATA staff and members from the ATA Certification Committee.


K-10 NEW SESSION
Workshop on Korean Language Reference Materials
Jisu Kim
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Competent interpreters and translators must keep up with an ever-changing world and study terminology and concepts for assignments across a spectrum of disciplines. Accordingly, identifying and selecting appropriate reference materials, including books and websites, is essential for carrying out each assignment successfully. This session will focus on strategies for identifying and utilizing various reference books and websites that are useful for Korean interpreters and translators. Workshop participants will be asked to contribute to the creation of a list of useful reference books and websites that will be posted on the Korean Language Division website.


Korean
Related Sessions

L-7 Translations of Eastern Religious Texts: Tradition for Working Translators

LT-4 Information Security for the Freelance Translator

Nordic Languages
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N-1 Nordic Division Annual Meeting
Christian Schoenberg
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Nordic Division Annual Meeting offers its members an excellent opportunity to meet and network with other Nordic-language translators and interpreters. All division members are encouraged to attend. Nonmembers are also invited to come learn more about the division. We will review the division's activities over the past year, as well as develop a plan for 2012. Specific items on this year's agenda: Connecting with translator organizations in the Scandinavian countries, reaching out to chambers of commerce, ND on LinkedIn, the updated ND website, the ND Blog, and the Annual ND Dinner.


Portuguese
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P-1 The Craft of Revising Translations
Eloisa D. Marques
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Portuguese)

This presentation will provide a brief explanation of the editorial process, discuss the differences between copyediting and reviewing, and concentrate on reviewing and proofreading translations. The presenter will ask participants to work on a series of short reviewing exercises covering some of the most common problems encountered in translations. The exercises will be divided into several areas: problems of meaning transfer, content, language and style, and physical presentation. The goal is to give translators enough tools to help them make a thorough self-review of their translation and to feel confident in tackling the job of reviewing other translators' work.


P-2 The 100 Most Difficult Words to Translate into Portuguese: Avoiding Portuguenglish
Tereza D. Braga
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

This presentation will test and review your comprehension skills, reading habits, and vocabulary. Participants will be challenged to come up with multiple and unexpected translations. It is not enough to be aware of false cognates.


P-3 Portuguese Language Division Annual Meeting
Elena Langdon Fortier, Cristina Silva, and Naomi J. Sutcliffe de Moraes
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Portuguese)

Members of the Portuguese Language Division are very excited that ATA's Annual Conference is being held in Boston, a city that has long been renowned for its Brazilian, Portuguese, Azorean, and Cape Verdean presence. Immigrants from these countries have contributed tremendously to the local cuisine and cultural landscape of this region. During this year's meeting, in addition to a detailed report on the division activities and election results for the new division administrative team, we will have a trivia game designed to get you talking about the Lusophone presence in this region. Fiquem ligados!


P-4 A Primer of the Brazilian Legal System: Laws, Courts, and Appeals
Ana Luiza Iaria
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English and Portuguese)




P-5 CANCELLED
The Language of International Contracts
Valdelane Azeve Clayton
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: Portuguese)




P-6 Introduction to Subtitling Techniques and Strategies for English<>Portuguese Translators
Bianca Bold and Carolina Alfaro de Carvalho
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Starting with an overview of audiovisual translation, an area in which subtitling is one of many options, the presenters will discuss various aspects of translation for subtitling. Attention will be given to its purposes, public, common procedures, involved media, and unique structural features. Tips on syntactic and stylistic elements will help translators convey a succinct, efficient message on the screen despite the inherent space and time constraints. Through the English<>Portuguese translation of short movie clips, participants will have the chance to apply the new techniques. The group will then discuss the possible outcomes of the hands-on exercise.


P-7 Why Can't We Understand Each Other If We Speak the Same Language?
Isabel Pinto Franco
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This presentation will focus on the cultural and linguistic differences between two Portuguese-speaking groups and the interpreting challenges that this can entail. Examples of culturally charged expressions will be given as one of the challenges. The presenter will also provide information regarding the characteristics of these groups, both pre- and post-immigration. The acculturation process will be touched upon as a context to better understand the two groups. The presenter will suggest ways to provide the best interpreting despite these differences.


P-8 How Green Is Your Translation? Understanding Environmental Concepts and Terminology in English and Portuguese
Marsel N. de Souza
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Portuguese)

The presenter will discuss how environment translation is a unique field in that it is often associated with an array of other seemingly distant areas of expertise. What does it take to specialize as an environmental translator? What should translators in other areas of expertise know about the environment? An overview of subareas of environmental translation will be provided, including sustainable development, climate change, and nature conservation. Key environmental concepts and terminology will be examined in the English<>Portuguese pairs. Participants will receive useful resources and tips for terminological research.


P-9 ANACpedia
Fernanda Silva
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Portuguese)




P-10 Topics in Literary Translation
Jayme Costa Pinto
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: Portuguese)

A new wave of translations of established literary works—by such authors as Joyce, Proust, and Emily Dickinson, to name a few—is expected to hit the Brazilian book market in the coming months, bringing to light (once again) important issues in the field of translation studies. This presentation will touch on linguistic (rhythm, meter, prosody) as well as cultural (imagery, metaphors, allusions) topics, with an eye to eventually arriving at the core of any literary translation attempt: aesthetic value. Excerpts of literary texts and their respective translations, both prose and poetry, will be used to illustrate the cases in point.


P-11 NEW SESSION
Juvenile Court Is Not Child's Play: Sight Translation from Court Documents (Portuguese>English)
Arlene M. Kelly
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Sight translation can be seen as a bridge between translation and interpreting. As a mode of interpreting, it does not receive the attention it deserves. This interactive session will draw on each participant's knowledge to contribute to working groups as different exercises are presented that can lead to successful sight translation. Official documents written in Portuguese will be used for some interactive practice.


Portuguese
Related Sessions

SEM-B Brazil and Portugal: Two Countries Separated by a Common Language

S-8 The Organization of American States: The Role of In-House Translators

Spanish
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

S-1 Overview of Intellectual Property Rights
Graciela S. Souto
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Spanish)

Intellectual property rights are deemed one of the most important tools used to promote economic development. Consequently, the need for translators specialized in this field is increasing constantly. This presentation will address topics such as patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets. Reference will be made to the main international intellectual property organizations created for their protection. Participants will have the opportunity to learn the basic concepts, translate some related documents, and create a short but useful glossary.


S-2 Translating Extradition Requests Between Mexico and the U.S.
Tony A. Rosado
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: Spanish)

Every year, Mexico and the U.S. seek the extradition of individuals who may have violated the laws of the other country. In many cases, the correct legal translation can mean the difference between success or failure. Mexican law offices look for translators who are familiar with Mexican legal terminology. This presentation will focus on the best translation of American legal terms into Mexican legal Spanish. Participants will learn what attorneys and judges need from a translator and how to be a part of this specialized field. The presenter is an attorney and a federally certified court interpreter.


S-3 Pre-judgment Remedies and the "Medidas Cautelares": Similarities and Differences
Graciela S. Souto
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: Spanish)

As part of debtor/creditor law and also because it is closely related to procedural law, the translation of documents dealing with pre-judgment remedies are generally difficult to translate because of the very specific and distinctive terminology used. This presentation will focus on the explanation of the different pre-judgment remedies available in American law, comparing these with the so-called "medidas cautelares" existing in Latin American countries, and the translation of related documents.


S-4 Why Should We Proofread Our Own Translations?

(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

This presentation will help us proofread our own translations. We usually pay special attention to terminology while disregarding other linguistic aspects such as syntax, grammar, orthography, etc., since as Spanish speakers, we take it for granted that our final text is correct. But is this absolutely true? Let's focus on the detection of mistakes and how to correct them by applying the linguistic Spanish conventions once our text is translated. We will first define the text type and then apply the academic rules governing the orthographic, morpho-syntactic, and lexico-semantic conventions to render a final error-free piece of writing.


S-5 Comparative Punctuation (English>Spanish)

(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

This presentation will provide a detailed comparison of punctuation rules in English and Spanish. The focus will be on the differences that are most likely to be overlooked by the translator, thus creating English interferences in the Spanish target text. A substantial part of the presentation will be devoted to practical exercises based on real texts.


S-6 Best Practices for Spanish Technical Writing
Mario E. Chavez
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Spanish)

Spanish translators engaged in technical translation are also technical writers, helping to shape the style and presentation of technical documentation. Writing procedures, white papers, patents, material safety data sheets, and user manuals requires more than just language and writing skills. Because the field of technical writing in Spanish is so underdeveloped, where do translators find guidelines and best practices? Spanish style manuals ignore the topic. In this presentation, participants will brainstorm on these issues and receive some recommendations to improve their technical writing in a more standard, consistent, and Spanish-friendly way.


S-7
Andre Moskowitz
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

The speaker will present the results of his field research on 28 sets of verbs that show dialectal variation including the following: amueblar / amoblar; consensuar / consensar; lotear / lotificar / lotizar; empanizar / apanar / empanar / rebozar; doblar / girar / voltear / virar / torcer / coger / agarrar (a la derecha / izquierda); and jalar / halar / tirar (de) / estirar. Translators, interpreters, proofreaders, editors, and educators need to be aware of these dialectal differences, lest they negatively judge Spanish that violates one national language standard but conforms to another, equally valid one. We will explore these differences, get to "know" each other (linguistically speaking) a little better, and hopefully overcome some of our preconceived notions about what constitutes "correct" Spanish.


S-8 The Organization of American States: The Role of In-House Translators
Mirna Soares Andrade and Sheyla Barretto de Carvalho
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

As the world's oldest regional organization, the Organization of American States (OAS) is multicultural and multilingual by nature. The four official OAS languages (Spanish, English, Portuguese, and French) make translation necessary to enable communication, foster negotiations, and reinforce diversity. Working as an in-house translator in this environment demands a great deal of team work, research, methodology, and exchange with staff, consultants, and diplomats to produce texts that are coherent and meaningful. This presentation will provide an inside view of OAS from the translator's standpoint.


S-9 Medical Devices: Translation, Localization, and Global Requirements and Standards
Cristina Marquez de Camihort
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Advanced; Presented in: Spanish)

There is much risk involved with the translation and localization of medical devices due to the nature of the products, particularly those intended for invasive procedures. The localized or translated devices must conform to the same requirements and performance standards set for the manufacturer's design, which might differ depending on whether the product is intended for professional use or for consumers. This presentation will discuss briefly the categories and classifications of medical devices, regulatory bodies, European directives, quality standards, risks management, language requirements, and Spanish terminology resources.


S-10 Should I Use the Translation Memory or the Glossary?
Cristina Marquez de Camihort
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

The increasing use of computer-assisted translation tools and expertise on these products has created a tendency to use them for purposes not planned for in their original design. The use of a translation memory as a glossary is not unusual and could be useful in some translation fields. After all, it is a database containing a bilingual pair for every word of the original document. Can we use translation memory as a glossary successfully in terms of speed and accuracy? This presentation will offer a glimpse of some nontraditional ways to take full advantage of translation memory as a terminology source.


S-11 Spanish Language Division Annual Meeting
Marcela Jenney
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

The Spanish Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members the opportunity to meet, network, and learn the direction and activities of the SPD during the past year as well as its plans for the future. All division members are encouraged to attend. Nonmembers are also invited to come and learn about the SPD. Some of the specific items on this year's agenda are: the 2012 Mid-Year Conference, updates on committees, SPD's social media presence, and our exciting plans for 2012.


S-12 Subtitling: Translating Feature Films into Latin American Spanish
Sandra B. Ramacciotti Giorgio
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

Subtitling poses many creative challenges, such as how to deal with style, register, idiolect, and character treatment while adhering to the timing requirements of subtitled feature film. The presenter will explore the translation procedures and strategies most commonly used to provide natural subtitles that do not interfere with the representation on screen. Participants will have access to handouts, scripts, and dialogue and analyze the subtitles of many scenes from different movies.


S-13 "User-Friendly" Translation: English>Spanish Translation in a High-Tech World
Madalena Sanchez Zampaulo
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Business owners and marketing experts recognize the need to create user-friendly sites in Spanish that are localized for U.S. Latinos and other Spanish-speaking consumers. The demand for English>Spanish translation and localization of web content is growing constantly as the Latino population's buying power increases each year. The presenter will reference topics found in Joe Kutchera's recent book, Latino Link: Building Brands Online with Hispanic Communities and Content, as well as other literature, to address the demand for more professional translation in this niche market and how freelancers can benefit from a rapidly-changing cyber world.


S-14 NEW SESSION
Diplomatic Translation: Working in an Embassy
Gloria L. Jaramillo
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Diplomatic translators must have extensive knowledge and be very familiar with international affairs, especially the political, social, and economic circumstances of their own countries. This presentation will discuss what goes on in an embassy or consulate and the challenges full-time in-house translators face every day.


Spanish
Related Sessions

SEM-C The Language of Clinical Research Protocols and Informed Consents

SEM-E Contractual Law: Main Principles and Specific Terminology

SEM-L Advanced Spanish>English Legal Translation

LAW-3 "ZEN Tensed" by Law

LAW-6 Let's Get REAL!

ST-7 Mind All the Gaps in Spanish>English Technical Translation

TP-5 Out Damned Theory!

Slavic Languages
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

SL-1 RValent: In Russia, Translators Have a (Publishing) House to Call Home
Valentina Kolesnichenko
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: Russian)

In 1992, the presenter founded RValent Publishers. Since then, despite limited experience working as a translator or interpreter herself, she has presided over a company that serves as Russia's primary forum for discussion of translation theory and practice. Many of the top minds in the field publish books with RValent and contribute to Mosty, its journal for translators and interpreters. The presenter will share the RValent story and discuss the state of the profession in Russia today and the challenges confronted by a business like hers. This presentation will be simultaneously interpreted by a former UN interpreter.


SL-2 Translating the Songs of Bulat Okudzhava
Lydia Razran Stone and Vladimir J. Kovner
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English with Russian examples)

The presenters will discuss the issues involved in translating into English the songs of Bulat Okudzhava, the most influential Russian "bard" (singer songwriter) of the 20th century. One of the presenters was an active participant in the Bard movement, and will share his insights on its nature and significance. He will also provide the lion's share of musical understanding for the translation. The presenters have been collaborating on Russian<>English poetic translations for six years. This project required even closer cooperation than usual, and the collaboration procedure eventually worked out will be described in detail.


SL-3 English Phrasal Verbs in Translation: A Lexicographic and Corpus Study of Equivalence
Magdalena Perdek
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The presentation will examine selected Polish equivalents of English phrasal verbs (PVs) as presented in bilingual English>Polish dictionaries and found in a parallel corpus (PHRAVERB) compiled for the purpose of the study. The lexicographic equivalents have been analyzed in terms of their precision in reference to the English definitions of PVs, their usability in the translation of corpus-derived sentences and dictionary examples, and finally, their collocational relations. The corpus equivalents have also been examined in terms of their form (i.e., whether they are verbal, nominal, or phrasal). In addition, the use of metaphor in translation of PVs has also been investigated.


SL-4 Slavic Languages Division Annual Meeting
Becky Blackley
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Slavic Languages Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other translators and interpreters. Participants will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2012. Election results will also be announced. All division members are encouraged to attend and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.


SL-5 How Virtual Networking Is Changing the Mentality of Russian Freelancers: A Case Study
Ekaterina Ryabtseva
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In 2001, the "Planet Earth, Translators' City" project was launched to create a virtual global village for Russian-speaking translators and interpreters. It proved to be a popular professional social networking environment, helping to educate neophytes and shaping the professional culture and its subcultures. Then, the project spilled over into reality, inducing a wave of major offline conferences in Russia. Today, the City boasts an estimated 4,000 daily visitors from nearly 130 countries. This presentation will cover the history of this unique project and its impact on the market reality.


SL-6 Coping with Challenges of Simultaneous Interpreting into Russian in Courtroom Settings
Irina Y. Jesionowski
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The language of American courts is chock-full of compact, meaning-dense terms and expressions that present an inherent challenge when interpreting them into Russian in the simultaneous mode at the breakneck speed required of courtroom discourse. This presentation will offer several case studies on compensating for the lack of equivalent legal concepts in Russian law. Topics will include coping with verboseness of the Russian language as well as with syntactical challenges such as adjectival clusters and adjective-noun agreement. Participants will be encouraged to take part in the discussion, offer their solutions to interpreting puzzles, and complete interpretation exercises.


SL-7 Notes on Notes, or How to Secure the Correct Meaning When Translating Securities Stuff
Maksym Kozub
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

After reviewing some basic concepts, this presentation will deal with the more difficult issues involved with the English<>Russian translation of texts on securities and structured financial instruments. General concepts and principles will be illustrated by examples. Special attention will be paid to differentiate the degrees of freedom that translators have, depending on the nature of the text, its target audience, and other factors.


Slavic Languages
Related Sessions

L-5 Translating Art Songs for Performance: Rachmaninoff's Six Choral Songs

TRM-2 Search-fu! Finding Terminology on the Internet

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