SESSIONS BY LANGUAGE

ATA58 offers sessions that focus on a variety languages, plus sessions of other specializations that are related to these languages. Select a language below to see what sessions are offered.

  • ATA-certified translators may earn one CEP for each hour attended, up to a maximum of 10 CEPs. Learn more
  • Certified interpreters may earn continuing education credit. Learn more

Make your selection:

 

Arabic Chinese Dutch
French German Italian
Japanese Korean Nordic Languages
Portuguese Slavic Languages Spanish




Arabic
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


A-1 Degrees of Freedom in Arabic Translation: Does Garbage Have the Right to Remain Garbage?
Louay Abdulla, CT
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

How far should a translator go to improve the source text? Is it part of the translator’s role? The speaker will discuss how Arabic translators can deal with this issue on a daily basis.


A-2 Think in English from the Start
Rania Hijazeen, CT | Rula Hijazeen, CT
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Arabic)

A mistake as small as a preposition could not only mean failing ATA’s certification exam, but also losing business. This hands-on session will examine the most common linguistic errors made in English by Arabic-speaking translators. Attendees will work through real-life examples and learn to identify and correct errors in future projects.


A-3 Arabic Criminal Terminology and Court Interpreting
Amine El Fajri
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English and Arabic)

Both Arabic interpreters and translators will be introduced to more than 100 common criminal terms, their meanings, and the Arabic target-language renditions. Extensive key terminology and a glossary of legal terms will be used throughout the session. Attendees will review the language and terms commonly used during criminal court proceedings. Time will be allowed for group discussions.


Arabic
Related Sessions

T-7 Localizing Middle-Eastern Languages: Is this Right (or is it Left)?

 
 

Chinese
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C-1 Lessons Learned from Grading ATA Practice Tests
Ran Zhao, CT | Jessie Lu
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Chinese)

The speaker will provide a thorough error analysis based on his experience grading English>Chinese practice tests over the past few years. This session is designed to provide exam candidates with a better understanding of typical translation mistakes and how different categories of mistakes are graded. A list of best practices for taking the exam will also be proposed.


C-2 Tighten It Up: How to Tame a Loose Text
Evelyn Garland, CT
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Chinese)

“Break it up” is possibly the most common advice you hear about translating into Chinese. When translating Chinese into English, if you don’t “tighten it up,” you risk sounding like a rambler. However, when you’re dealing with a source language (Chinese) that’s grammatically loose and highly context-dependent, tightening up the text isn’t easy and goes far beyond eliminating excessive words. The speaker will explore additional ways to bring vim and vigor to your translation.


 
 

Dutch
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D-1 Undocumented Immigrants or Illegal Immigrants? How Do Political Preferences Influence Your Translations?
Neil Gouw
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Dutch)

In an era of fact-free politics, alternative facts, and fake news, translators belong to that rare breed of professionals seeking objectivity and neutrality. But just how objective and neutral are we? After all, we’re also susceptible to subjectivity and idiosyncratic views. To what extent have your political preferences and worldview influenced your translations? How have they affected your interpretation of the source material? The goal of this session is to reflect on the interplay between our biases and our translations. The speaker will discuss several examples and invite attendees to share their thoughts and experiences.


 
 

French
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F-1 Translating for Canada
Grant Hamilton
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Canada is a huge market for French to/from English translators, and much of the work is for premium clients. But to be successful there, you need answers. “What do I need to know about the country?” “How does Canadian English differ from U.S. English?” “Will I understand the French?” “Can I use European French for a Canadian audience?” This session will provide answers and a quick checklist of tips and advice to put you on the road to success north of the border.


F-2 The Role of the Interpreter in Diplomacy: Part I
Rosalinda Meza-Steel
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will draw on her experience as a high-level diplomatic interpreter and as a professor of interpreting studies to take a critical look at the role of the interpreter in diplomatic circles. What can past eras tell us about the role of interpreting in diplomacy? What role can we expect the interpreter to play in today’s fast-paced, uncharted diplomatic waters? The speaker will examine the past, present, and future of diplomatic interpreting.


F-3 The Role of the Interpreter in Diplomacy: Part II
Rosalinda Meza-Steel
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

See abstract for F-2: The Role of the Interpreter in Diplomacy: Part I


F-4 Never a Dull Day? The Nitty Gritty of French>English Technical Translation
Karen Tkaczyk, CT
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

After gaining the 10,000 hours of experience that experts say we need to become a subject matter expert, some translation choices become rote. Other phrasing still provides challenges. And certain terms emerge as being what you frequently edit out of other translators’ work. The speaker is a translator working in chemistry and related fields. The speaker will first discuss a selection of errors that she commonly sees from others and then address some thorny problems that can make or break any experienced technical translator’s day. Examples will be from the speaker’s practice. Interaction and questions will be welcomed.


F-5 Breaking the Mold Again! Throwing Out Even More Translations for an Intimate Look at Source Material
Angela Benoit
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English and French)

The “Breaking the Mold” format strikes again! In this session, the speaker will analyze and discuss a series of source-to-source comparisons in both English and French to bring to light insights that are often overlooked during translation. The goal of this technique is to combat “translationese” by rewiring the way we think and write. Both French>English and English>French translators will benefit from this session. New examples and content will be presented.


F-6 Grow Your Translation Business with Genealogical Translation
Bryna O'Sullivan
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Thanks to digitization, genealogy has a growing need for translators. In the past, a genealogist who needed records from abroad was forced to rely on a local genealogist to locate records and interpret anything written in an unfamiliar language. Now, genealogists can retrieve these records online. However, they still need help understanding them. Learn how, as a French>English translator, you can meet that need. Find out what background knowledge you’ll need to work effectively with “typical” genealogical documents, the form your final translation should take, and how to market to genealogists.


French
Related Sessions

LAW-4 Deciphering Spanish-language Bylaws: A Structural Approach

MED-4 Translating Diagnostic Imaging: Is It Hyperechoic or Hyperintense?

 
 

German
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G-1 Translating Premodifying Attributes from English>German
Karin Königs
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: German)

Translating premodifying attributes from English into German can be tricky. On the one hand, an obvious alternative doesn’t always present itself where a structurally analogous translation is not possible. On the other hand, a seemingly obvious word-by-word translation may be semantically incorrect. This session will offer an inventory of translating variants for the premodifying attribute. These can be examined one by one in cases where the translation proves difficult, so finding a good solution no longer depends only on the translator’s intuition.


G-2 A Systematic Presentation of English Nonfinite Constructions and Their Translation into German
Karin Königs
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: German)

The various nonfinite constructions in the English language, including the “with-” and the “for-” constructions, tend to be a challenge for English>German translators. Common participle and infinitive constructions will be analyzed on the basis of their syntactical function to show that they make up a comprehensive system of nonfinite constructions. Simultaneously, when discussing each individual nonfinite construction, the translation variants will be examined. Interesting parallels become apparent and, as a result, the range of translation variants narrows down to a manageable number that lend themselves to being systematized.


G-3 German>English Translation Slam
Matt Baird | Mary Burke | Ted Wozniak, CT | Heike Holthaus | Michael Martin
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and German)

Join us for a session of competitive German>English translation, pitting two pairs of translators against each other in a light-hearted linguistic duel. Will it be a bloodless battle? Fun will be the name of the game as we explore what are sure to be varying styles and savvy solutions to interesting translation problems. Audience participation will be encouraged, so come armed with your proverbial red pen, but be prepared to applaud your clever (and courageous) colleagues!


G-4 Passives, Punctuation, Particles, and Other Potential Pitfalls in German>English Translation
Geoffrey Cox
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translating German texts into English poses a host of challenges, including both familiar and some less-than-obvious ones. This session will provide a practical, hands-on look at a range of subtle-to-glaring issues facing translators and editors. These include differences in syntax, verb tenses, conjunctions, punctuation, filler words, negation, false friends, and more. Attendees will be provided with some tools to turn good translations into great ones.


G-5 German Corporate Governance Texts: A Translator’s Guide
Deborah Fry
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Corporate governance is an important topic for language professionals, as it plays a major and growing role in management and reporting. This session will offer a translator’s perspective of the subject using the German corporate governance system as an example. Attendees will be provided with an overview of basic conceptual issues, organizational structures, the statutory framework, and key documents such as the German Corporate Governance Code. Current developments and future trends will be discussed and practical hints on dealing with specific text types, weasel words, and other pitfalls given. A resource list and Q&A session will round off the session.


G-6 German Orthography: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Dagmar Jenner | Judy Jenner
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: German)

German orthography has always been a headache for many, especially after its reform in 1996. The speakers will open up their vast collection of ghastly spelling mistakes published in newspapers, brochures, and menus and discuss their relentless, if hereto unsuccessful, quest for a world with correct capitalization and no misplaced commas and apostrophes. Along the way, they will address tricky aspects of German orthography that might result in light bulb moments even for very experienced German translators and interpreters.


G-7 NEW SESSION
English>German Translation Slam
Eva Stabenow, CT | Ruth Boggs, CT | Jutta Diel-Dominique | Maren Mentor
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English and German)

Join us for a session of competitive translation from English into German, pitting four translators (in teams of two) against each other in a light-hearted linguistic duel. Will it be a bloodless battle? Fun will be the name of the game as we explore what are sure to be varying translation styles and savvy solutions to interesting translation problems. Audience participation will be welcome so come armed with your proverbial red pen, but be prepared to applaud your clever--and courageous--colleagues!


 
 

Italian
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IT-1 Beyond and Around Pure Words (Attorno e oltre le parole): Part I
Annamaria Testa
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: Italian)

It’s commonly known that the meaning of a text can change in relation to its context. Nevertheless, only verbal and situational context are usually considered in terms of potential change. The speaker will show more than 100 examples of how images, colors, typography, layout, and graphics can radically change or even reverse the meaning of a simple and apparently unambiguous phrase like “bella giornata oggi” (good day today). For this reason, when translators receive a text, especially a short one, they should also be given information on visual context that will help them produce better translations and transcreations.


IT-2 Beyond and Around Pure Words (Attorno e oltre le parole): Part II
Annamaria Testa
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: Italian)

See abstract for IT-1: Beyond and Around Pure Words (Attorno e oltre le parole): Part I


IT-3 Transcreation: More Than Just Creative Translation
Francesca Marchei | Giovanna Massari
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Italian)

What’s the thought process behind transcreation? A panel of translators, with help from attendees, will look for possible answers in an open discussion based on examples of taglines, catch phrases, and other content taken from our professional experience. Attendees are invited to bring their own samples and talk about the solutions they found.


IT-4 NEW SESSION
The Importance of Translating Punctuation and Typographic Conventions
Silvia D'Amico | Kristin Kamm
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Italian )

A text with bad punctuation and odd capitalization can be off-putting and irritating. All too often translators focus on translating sentences and concepts and neglect other elements of the written text that are equally important. With examples mainly in English and Italian, attendees will learn the important cohesive and semantic functions performed by punctuation in a written text and how to improve readability of the target text using proper punctuation. The speaker will also discuss the challenges of accurately translating punctuation, capitalization, figure, date, and other formatting conventions as well as the risks arising from poor choices.


 
 

Japanese
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J-1 CANCELLED
Views of a Patent Attorney: The Intellectual Property Trend and Its Impact on Patent Translation
Momoko Okuda
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Japanese)




J-2 Japanese>English Translation of Clinical Trial Documents
Matthew Schlecht
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Japanese>English clinical trial translation occupies a large niche within the medical translation workflow. The terminology and usage are highly technical, but after mastering the learning curve, clinical trial translations tend to follow a standard pattern. Intended for intermediate-level translators, this session will provide information on clinical trials, those involved in the process, and the types of documents for translation. Techniques for terminology search/management (names of drugs, diseases, symptoms, adverse events, etc.) will be described with examples. Attendees will learn about inclusion/exclusion criteria, endpoints, deviations, randomization, blinding, protocols, consent forms, and clinical trial contracts. Resources for translation will be provided.


J-3 Translating Sex and Gender: Part I, Henry James
J. Keith Vincent
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Language having to do with sexuality and gender exhibits great cultural and historical variation and specificity. This is especially true of Japanese, where sexual and gender norms have undergone massive shifts over the past 150 years. This two-part session will discuss specific examples of choices that literary translators have made in translating sex and gender. Part one will focus on homosexual sexuality in different Japanese translations of works by Henry James.


J-4 Translating Sex and Gender: Part II, The Tale of Genji
J. Keith Vincent
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Language having to do with sexuality and gender exhibits great cultural and historical variation and specificity. This is especially true of Japanese, where sexual and gender norms have undergone massive shifts over the past 150 years. This session will focus on expressions of sexual desire and problems of consent using examples from four English translations of the Tale of Genji.


J-5 Get "Gung Ho!": Japanese Interpreting and Translating in the North America Automotive Sector
Denise Fisher | Mary Goudreau | Paul Koehler | Shizuka Matsunaga | James Patrick
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Japanese)

From large brand name manufacturers to second- and third-tier local suppliers, the automotive industry is a major sector of the North American economy. Japanese automakers and their suppliers are a significant source of work for Japanese>English interpreters and translators. With local production and global sourcing, we’ve come a long way from the trade friction of the 1980s. What kind of work is needed today in this dynamic and growing area? Where are these jobs? What are the challenges? A panel of Japanese>English language specialists will discuss these and other questions.


J-6 "Bye, Felicia." Tackling Allusions, Slang, and Pop Culture References
Yoshihiro Mochizuki, CT | Motoko Oshino Matthews
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Japanese)

Allusions, like figures of speech, challenge the knowledge and interpretive ability of translators and interpreters. Profound knowledge of the source text is required to recognize that an expression is a reference to another text. Thus, allusive passages often go unrecognized by the readers. This session will use the translation of hip-hop lyrics and quotes from movies and books to provide strategies for tackling allusions, slang, and pop culture references. The speakers will also introduce resources for keeping pace with English and Japanese pop culture. The session will include hands-on training where attendees look for allusions and references in English and Japanese texts.


J-7 NEW SESSION
Achieving Equivalent Meaning and Equivalent Impact in Japanese>English Translation
James Davis, CT
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The twin goals in any translation project are: 1) to convey in the target language a meaning that is equivalent to the meaning in the source language; and 2) to generate an impact on the target-language audience that is equivalent to the impact on the source-language audience. The translator must balance the exotic against the familiar, fidelity to the source text against clarity in the target language, and the need to recreate against the need to rewrite. The speaker will demonstrate how these competing elements can be combined to achieve equivalent meaning and equivalent impact in Japanese>English translation.


 
 

Korean
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K-1 The New Linguistic Landscape of Contemporary Korean: Part I
Young-mee Yu Cho
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

There are several dramatic changes occurring in the Korean language, two of which are especially noteworthy. First, new word-formation processes have emerged that have been adopted even in formal registers: 1) combining loan words and native morphemes; and 2) using acronyms. Second, sound-symbolic vocabulary now functions as an open category. New usages are created from existing non-mimetic words, while sound-symbolic adverbs are used independently in space-limited contexts, such as headlines and texting. The speaker will discuss these changes in more detail.


K-2 The New Linguistic Landscape of Contemporary Korean: Part II
Young-mee Yu Cho
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

See abstract for K-1: The New Linguistic Landscape of Contemporary Korean: Part I


K-3 CANCELLED
Connecting the Missing Links at the DOJ
Jaewon Rodriguez | Mi-Ae Wartenbee
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: Korean)




K-4 Doing More with Less: Taking Your Note-taking Skills to the Next Level
Sieun Lee
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Korean)

Efficient note-taking can make or break a consecutive interpreting performance, especially in a situation where an interpreter is asked to handle longer segments. As tempting as it may be, trying to take as many notes as possible, also known as “frantic note-taking,” is not sustainable and may even hinder a smooth delivery of messages. In this session, beginners as well as seasoned interpreters will hone their skills by developing more structured notes, writing down words more selectively, and incorporating functional symbols in their notes. Attendees will walk away with creative tactics for covering more messages with less notes.


 
 

Nordic Languages
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N-1 The Swedish School: Extracurricular Language Schools in the U.S.
Petra Glimåker-Socolovsky
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Every Saturday morning, a high school just outside the nation’s capital turns into little Sweden. The classrooms fill up with 85 kids between the ages of 3 and 17 who learn Swedish language, history, and culture. The Swedish School for Children in Washington, DC, is one of the biggest Swedish part-time schools in the U.S. During this session, we’ll discuss the background, focus, and challenges of the school, and why extracurricular language schools like this one are important to the field of translation.


N-2 Cursing and Anachronisms: Swedish Culture Clash
Petra Glimåker-Socolovsky
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Learning Swedish in Sweden is one thing. Learning it in the U.S. is quite different. Students at the Swedish School for Children in Washington, DC, have mainly been exposed to the Swedish spoken by one or both parents. As a result, they risk ending up with an outdated vocabulary and entirely unprepared to deal with contemporary Swedish. The Swedish School struggles to prepare its students to navigate modern Swedish usage, but has come up with a few strategies that work in both cultures. The speaker will discuss these strategies.


N-3 CANCELLED
Translating Contracts from Swedish into English: Problems and Pitfalls
David Kendall, CT
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)




N-4 NEW SESSION
Comparison of Scandinavian and U.S. Legal Systems
Alisa Hamilton | Thor Truelson
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English, Danish, and Swedish)

This session will compare the Swedish and Danish legal systems to the U.S. system. Examining the similarities and differences between the systems should provide greater context when translating Scandinavian legal texts into English.


 
 

Portuguese
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P-1 Mandioca, macaxeira, aipim: quando a culinária vira uma salada russa
Clarissa Surek-Clark, CT
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Portuguese)

The speaker will discuss real instances of English>Portuguese translations of recipes, ingredients, and menus. The discussion will also focus on regional dialect variation among Lusophone countries. Attendees will work on a small glossary of sticky food terms.


P-2 CANCELLED
Yes, You Can! Even Better Portuguese>English Translations for Native Portuguese Speakers
Lynnea Hansen
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Portuguese)




P-3 Literary Dialect: The Challenge of Translating New York Hustlers and Brazilian Miners
Jayme Costa-Pinto | Karen Sotelino
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Portuguese)

In this session, the speaker will analyze the writing style of authors Damon Runyon (American) and Alvaro Cardoso Gomes (Brazilian) and their works, Guys and Dolls and Ditched Dreams. In both works, style is closely dependent on literary dialect, contributed by New York gangsters in Runyon’s book, and by Brazilian miners in Gomes’ case. The translator is thus faced with the challenge of bridging the gap between discourse, as a linguist would record it, and the spoken language, as perceived by the literary artist. Attendees will learn from the speaker’s experience in addressing that challenge and have a chance to try their hand at similar translation problems.


P-4 The Challenges of Translating a Holocaust Survivor’s Memoir
Rafaela Lombardino, CT
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will explore the challenges of translating Nanette Blitz Konig’s memoir Eu Sobrevivi Ao Holocausto into English. The process of researching quotes originally written in English and making sure the vocabulary is faithful not only to the author’s account, but also to the many audiovisual materials available, will be discussed throughout the session.


P-5 Pitfalls of Interpreting between Portuguese and English
David Coles
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Drawing on many years of experience providing feedback to interpreting students, the speaker will examine cultural, phonetic, lexical, and grammatical pitfalls that can render English>Portuguese interpreting unidiomatic. The emphasis will be on discovering the underlying meanings behind the lexico-grammatical “veil” of the source language to find a mode of expression that’s as natural as possible in the target language. Examples will be taken from classes and real-life events. Reference will be made to sources of study material and to practice routines that enable such enhancements to take root.


P-6 Self-Recording, Transcribing, Language Analysis, and Self-Enhancement: Painstaking, but Rewarding
David Coles
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Patterns, habits, and errors in simultaneous interpreting can be revealed, analyzed, and tackled by the relatively simple expedient of self-recording. The time, patience, and commitment needed to self-transcribe, in addition to the often sobering “findings” that are unearthed, tend to prevent interpreters from exploiting this systematic look at themselves in order to improve. The “words on the page” are a kind of hidden realm wherein grammatical complexities (such as cleft sentences, which are widely used by English-speakers) can be anticipated, deconstructed, and neutralized, thus avoiding hesitation and unsatisfactory renderings. Three different self-enhancement projects will be demonstrated during this session.


Portuguese
Related Sessions

I-12 Interpreting Meets Transcreation in the Portuguese Version of Interpreting: Getting It Right

LAW-7 On/Off the Record: Anatomy of a Deposition and How to Master This Niche

LAW-4 Deciphering Spanish-language Bylaws: A Structural Approach

L-3 Forms of Faithfulness in Literary Translation

L-5 Researching Literary Translations

TRM-1 Extreme Terminology Management: Developing a Power Termbase

 
 

Slavic Languages
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SL-1 Susana Greiss Lecture: The Long and Winding Road to Becoming a Presidential Interpreter
Nikolai Sorokin
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will trace the path that led the speaker to become the U.S. Department of State’s lead Russian-language interpreter for five years during the administrations of Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. It will touch on the speaker’s educational experiences, work as a journalist for the Russian Language Service of the Voice of America, and joining the Department of State’s Office of Language Services. The speaker will offer anecdotes and lessons learned that could benefit aspiring interpreters working in any language combination.


SL-2 Wow! How Am I Going to Interpret That?
Nikolai Sorokin
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English and Russian)

This session will feature examples of idiomatic expressions used by Russian and American leaders, including Russian President Vladimir Putin. We’ll consider techniques to handle difficult moments, the level of significance that such expressions play in interpreted speech, and the advisability of adapting texts for cultural compatibility. We’ll also discuss, from an interpreter’s perspective, the types of expressions that seem to matter most in interpersonal communications. While examples will be in Russian, this session is designed to benefit to interpreters working in other languages.


SL-3 Localizing President Trump’s Statements into Russian
Alexey Rumyantsev
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

As a language expert working in U.S.-Russia bilateral relations, the speaker will analyze the localization of President Trump’s use of language in social media and interviews in Russian media outlets. The direct textbook translation cannot be applied here, and translations in Russia frequently employ embellishment. It’s useful to be aware of the required register while keeping the English original in mind. The speaker will share advice on handling these issues. Challenges include the use of colloquialisms, cultural references, truncation, and buzzwords. Interactive exercises will be included.


SL-4 Russian>English Translation Slam
Lydia Stone, CT | Shelley Fairweather-Vega, CT | Jennifer Guernsey
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Russian)

What do you get when you hire two different translators to translate the same passage? Two different translations, of course! In this session, an academic and literary translator and a scientific and medical translator will try their hand at identical passages that are outside of their usual subject areas. The discussion will compare and contrast the translators’ results and their different approaches to thorny passages. How did their different specialties and backgrounds affect their choices? Which solutions worked best? Participation is encouraged.


SL-5 Russian Submarines: How They’re Built
Robert Burns
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Prowling undetected beneath the sea is any nation’s worst nightmare: nuclear-powered fast attack submarines. With the ability to launch nuclear-tipped missiles, lay bottom-moored mines, and conduct surveillance near enemy shores, submarines pose a significant threat to naval forces and maritime shipping across the globe. Where these sharks of steel patrol is known by only a few, but understanding how they’re built and operate is accessible to everyone. The speaker will present a brief history of submarine construction in Russia and the Soviet Union before covering the multiple stages of construction, sea trials, and commissioning.


SL-6 CANCELLED
Criminal Law Terminology in Polish and English
Magdalena Perdek
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Polish)




SL-7 NEW SESSION
Slammin’ á la Russe: English to Russian Translation Slam
| Ekaterina Howard | Yulia Novikova-Wythe
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English, Russian)

During this session two translators will present their translations of a challenging text. The goal: to avoid walking into the source text traps and abusing Russian language and common sense. Will they succeed or will their translations be a tribute to the “beef á la russe” burger naming fail referenced in the title? Join us to find out and be ready to participate in the discussion!


Slavic Languages
Related Sessions

L-2 How to Mix Business with Poetry

L-1 The Russian Revolution in Spanish Translation: The Forgotten Revolution of the Ukrainian Anarchist Benjamin Abramson in Argentina

 
 

Spanish
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


S-1 Class Action Lawsuits: Terminology and Translation Pitfalls
Lorena Pike
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Spanish)

This class action lawsuits vocabulary workshop is geared towards translators and interpreters wishing to have a better understanding of the most common terminology found in a class action lawsuit notice and proposed settlement. Attendees will learn the steps in a class action lawsuit, the most common terminology found in a notice of settlement and a proposed class action settlement and their proposed equivalent in Spanish, and how solve issues encountered in the translation of class action lawsuits documents. Emphasis will be placed on Spanish for the U.S. and Mexico.


S-2 The English>Spanish Translation of Clinical Trial Protocols: Part I
Pablo Mugüerza
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Spanish)

According to some authorities, learning to translate clinical trial protocols is the best way to learn medical translation. Having spent more than 30 years translating, proofreading, and writing about protocols, the speaker will discuss the challenges involved in this area.


S-3 The English>Spanish Translation of Clinical Trial Protocols: Part II
Pablo Mugüerza
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Spanish)

See abstract for S-2: The English>Spanish Translation of Clinical Trial Protocols: Part I


S-4 Master the Game: Tackling Quality Assurance Issues
Gabriela Escarrá | Dolores Guinazu
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

Have you ever encountered negative client feedback despite having run all quality checks included in your computer-assisted translation tools and quality assurance software? This session will provide a better understanding of the issues to be considered to maximize translation quality. Attendees will be given a practical glimpse into a number of errors that are generally overlooked. The speakers will also analyze some practical examples and provide numerous tips on how to boost the quality of your translations into Spanish.


S-5 Different Levels in Translation Proofreading
María Ester Capurro
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: Spanish)

There are different levels of proofreading. Grammar is to be considered at the first level. The second level refers to orthotypography, or the visual aspect of the text. A third revision will lead us to check for coherence and cohesion to ensure that the text sounds natural and fluid. The fourth level deals with the use of proper words. The speaker will present actual examples and discuss common errors all translators make when reviewing a text.


S-6 Cuando sobran las palabras: The Problem of Over-Translation
Maria Barros, CT
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Over-translation, or the use in the target language of more words than are necessary to convey the meaning of the source text, is a common issue in English>Spanish translation. Verbose translations obscure the meaning for the reader and make all the stages of the translation process more costly and time consuming. Using examples from real texts, the speaker will analyze various types of over-translation and propose strategies to recognize and avoid the problem.


S-7 Translating HTML and XML: The Logical and Methodical Way
Salvador Virgen, CT
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: Spanish)

Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and its offspring, eXtensive Markup Language (XML), appear frequently in texts translators face daily. While most translation memory programs state that they can deal with the codes contained in these types of files, they is no substitute for human judgment. This session will describe the most frequent codes and offer some strategies to deal with them.


S-8 Translating Surveys for Hispanics in the U.S.
Kathy Byrd | Cristina Golab
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

According to a study published by the Instituto Cervantes, there are 41 million native Spanish speakers in the U.S. The Census Bureau estimates that the U.S. will be the largest Spanish-speaking nation in the world by 2050. However, a Pew Research analysis found that one-third of Hispanics are not proficient in English. Thus, translating surveys into Spanish makes it possible to collect information from this significantly important group. Attendees will learn how to tackle different types of surveys and translation issues, including the technical aspects of preparing the Spanish versions. The speakers will also address what doesn’t require translation.


S-9 The Structure of the Civil Law System and Its Impact on Translation: Part I
Guillermo Cabanellas
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The concepts used in legal Spanish are based on the traditions of civil law. These concepts are part of a structure that’s different from the legal systems of English-speaking countries in many respects. The speaker will describe the structure of the civil law system, how it’s different from common law, and the difficulties this creates for translation. Special emphasis will be placed on certain areas, such as the law of corporations and business associations.


S-10 The Structure of the Civil Law System and Its Impact on Translation: Part II
Guillermo Cabanellas
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

See abstract for S-9: The Structure of the Civil Law System and Its Impact on Translation: Part I


S-11 Interpreting and Translating for Farmers and Migrant Workers
Michelle Pinzl
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Both organic and conventional farming play important roles in food systems and ethics in the U.S. Among farmers, farmhands, and producers, many migrant workers, particularly from Latin America, harvest, produce, and manufacture the fruit, vegetables, meat, and dairy products that arrive in the homes of consumers. The work of many limited-English-proficient migrant workers has led to a growing demand for language access in agricultural contexts. Attendees will gain an understanding of the stakes of interpreting and translating in agriculture, while acquiring technical vocabulary needed for the farm. Terminology and resources in English/Spanish will be provided.


S-12 Subtitling Cultural References
Juan Baquero, CT
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Subtitles are judged both by audiences and fellow translators. (We frequently hear, “That wasn’t said in the original.”) Yet, most translators ignore the rules that govern subtitling: time, space, speed, and image. Moreover, translators continually face the hard task of subtitling cultural references. Whether these references are maintained or lost depends not only on the translator’s ability or creativity, but also on the subtitling strategies utilized. In this session, the reasons why cultural references were kept or lost in the movie Wild Tales (Relatos Salvajes) will be analyzed according to Jan Pedersen’s subtitling strategies. Attendees will leave with a better understanding of why certain subtitling strategies are preferred over others.



Spanish
Related Sessions

AST-07 Preparing for the ATA English>Spanish Certification Exam

   
   
   
   
   
AST-15 Preparing for the ATA Spanish>English Certification Exam

   
   
   
   
   
LAW-4 Deciphering Spanish-language Bylaws: A Structural Approach

   
   
   
   
   
L-1 The Russian Revolution in Spanish Translation: The Forgotten Revolution of the Ukrainian Anarchist Benjamin Abramson in Argentina

   
   
   
   
   

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