Nordic

 

N-1 (F, 10:15-11:45am) - ALL LEVELS
Nordic Division Annual Meeting
Edith M. Matteson, administrator, ATA Nordic Division, Ballwin, Missouri

Topics to be covered include: elections, future conferences, newsletter production, exams, and other business.

N-2 (S, 8:30-10:00am) - ALL LEVELS
Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish Translation Workshop-Part I
Irene B. Berman, owner, Accent, Inc., West Hartford, Connecticut; Helle P. Frandsen, associate professor, Copenhagen Business School, Hellerup, Denmark; Edith M. Matteson, administrator, ATA Nordic Division, Ballwin, Missouri; and David C. Rumsey, freelance translator and owner, North Country Translations, Elk Mound, Wisconsin

This session will be a two-part translation workshop (three hours total). One Norwegian, one Swedish, and two Danish texts will be published in the Nordic Division's newsletter Aurora Borealis before the conference. We will use the two sessions to review the translations of the texts and come up with a common translation. The panelists will answer other language-appropriate translation questions as time allows.

N-3 (S, 10:15-11:45am) - ALL LEVELS
Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish Translation Workshop-Part II
Irene Berman, owner, Accent, Inc., West Hartford, Connecticut; Helle Pals Frandsen, associate professor, Copenhagen Business School, Hellerup, Denmark; Edith M. Matteson, administrator, ATA Nordic Division, Ballwin, Missouri; and David C. Rumsey, freelance translator and owner, North Country Translations, Elk Mound, Wisconsin

N-4 (S, 3:30-4:15pm) - ALL LEVELS
The Translator Adds a Voice or Two: Pentti Saarikoski's Finnish Translation of The Catcher in the Rye
Douglas Robinson, professor of English, University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi

One of the most popular models of communication used in linguistic theories is borrowed from information theory, according to which the sender sends a message to a receptor, more or less in the same manner as a radio signal is sent from a transmitter to a receiver. In expanded versions of this model applied to translation, a new version of this same message is sent to a new receptor, who speaks a different language. Because the sender and the message are supposed to be the same (otherwise, you don't have equivalence!), there is no room in this model for the translator. Translation becomes a mechanical process that somehow magically transforms the message into something suitable for the new receptor. This presentation will employ Mikhail Bakhtin's model of double-voicing to show what actually happens in translation, using Pentti Saarikoski's Finnish translation of Salinger's Catcher in the Rye as an example.

 

For more information, contact ATA,
phone: (703) 683-6100; fax: (703) 683-6122;
or e-mail: conference@atanet.org.