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ATA 55th Annual Conference
 

10 Reasons to Attend This Year's Annual Conference


ATA 55th Annual Conference
Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers
Chicago, Illinois
November 5-8, 2014


When it comes to getting answers to business questions, this is the place to be. The ATA Annual Conference is the largest, most comprehensive, and most respected educational program in the profession. Still need convincing? Check out these 10 reasons to attend.
  • More Than 175 Educational Sessions. Whether you are a veteran or a first-timer, you'll walk away from the ATA Annual Conference with practical and realistic ways to build, manage, and grow your business.
  • Face-to-Face Networking. Get to know your colleagues, find new business contacts—more than 1,800 translators, interpreters, and company owners who can relate to you and your profession will attend this year's Conference.
  • Free App to Make Life Easy. Access the entire conference from your laptop, tablet, or cell phone with a free app—create an electronic schedule, share your résumé with colleagues, and connect with other attendees like never before.
  • Buddies Welcome Newbies. This is the second year of an event that pairs first-timers with veteran attendees--an opportunity to begin the conference with a smile, a friend, and a lot of tips for getting the most out of the conference.
  • New! The Tool Bar. Get a grip on technology! Get answers to your translation tool questions! Check out these one-on-one 15-minute sessions with real techs.
  • Meet the Vendors. Yes, the Exhibit Hall has all the latest software, books, and technology but it also offers you an opportunity to get to know the vendors and ask questions.
  • Résumé Exchange. Ready to work? Ready to hire? This special event is the place for freelancers and company reps to meet. Bring your business cards and résumés.
  • Division Open House. Targeted one-on-one information networking with professionals working in your specialty or language. Not a division member? No problem! Please attend and get to know these special interest communities.
  • Association Meetings. The chance to find out more about ATA's goals and how you can be part of them.
  • Time to Have Fun. From the opening Welcome Reception on Wednesday evening to the Conference Dance Party on Saturday night, there will be things to do, places to go, and fun to be had.
And one more ...

New! Brainstorming Networking. Find solutions! Make connections! Work in small teams to tackle common business-related challenges and get to know more about your colleagues.

Register today!


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Headlines


Industry News
California Pharmacies Resist Push to Translate Drug Labels
U.K. MPs Urge Modern Languages Recovery Program
California Bill Would Provide Needed Medical Interpreter Funding
UCLA Document Addresses Translation Issues in Chinese Medicine
Gmail Gets Translations for 13 More Languages
Oregon Has a Shortage of Certified Medical Interpreters
States Encourage Bilingualism With Diploma Seals
Study Finds Babies Develop Ear for Native Language as They Grow
Colorado Courts Cope With Language Explosion
Researchers Develop System for Translating Patents in Real Time
Translators Essential to Overseas Appeal of Korean Literature

ATA News
ATA Board of Directors: Meeting Summary July 12-13, 2014
ATA Election 2014: Final Slate of Candidates
The ATA Savvy Newcomer Celebrates First Anniversary
Choose the ATA Annual Conference Hotel
Exhibit and Sponsor
Coming Up in the August Issue of The ATA Chronicle

Industry News


California Pharmacies Resist Push to Translate Drug Labels

California pharmacists' refusal to translate drug labels is prompting the California State Board of Pharmacy to consider making the recommendation a requirement. A 2009 survey conducted by the Board found that bilingual wording was one of the five leading customer suggestions for making drug labels easier to read. Most pharmacists, however, believe the system in place works well, according to Jon Roth, CEO of the California Pharmacists Association. Currently, pharmacies must provide an interpreting service to relay instructions for prescription use to patients, but they are not required to print translated labels on the bottles. Roth says that pharmacists are concerned because they cannot validate medication instructions in a language they do not understand and would be held liable for any mistakes in the translation. "We think the potential for error outweighs the potential gain for a patient receiving medication in a translated form," he says. Language access advocates disagree. Dr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, director at the University of California's Davis Center for Reducing Health Disparities, says there is greater risk when non-English speaking patients fail to comply with a treatment routine simply because they do not understand how to use a medication. A bill introduced in February 2013, with sponsorship from the California Pan-Ethnic Health Network (CPEHN), would have mandated printed translations on pill bottles. According to Sarah de Guia, director of government affairs for CPEHN, opposition from pharmacists and prescribers forced the sponsors to remove the translation mandate from the bill. Virginia Herold, executive officer of the California State Board of Pharmacy, says the issue will be considered at the board's next meeting on July 31. The director of the New York Board of Pharmacy, which approved label translations in the spring of 2013, will be part of a panel presentation at the meeting. Herold says while it is difficult to guess what the board will do, she says, "The reality is if somebody hands you something in a language you can't read, you've got to find a way to figure out what it says."

From "California Pharmacies Resist Push to Translate Drug Labels"
Fresno Bee (CA) (07/23/14) Caiola, Sammy; Morales, Ernesto Garcia
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U.K. MPs Urge Modern Languages Recovery Program

A cross-party group of U.K. Members of Parliament and peers is calling on all parties to promise to improve modern language education as part of a "national recovery program." The All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on modern languages states that each year poor language skills cost Britain's economy about 50 billion British pounds in lost contracts as businesses miss out on export opportunities and struggle to fill job positions. APPG Chairman Baroness Coussins reports that in 2011 more than 27 percent of U.K. administrative and clerical posts went unfilled because of the lack of language skills. "The next government will need to take clear, urgent, and coherent action to upgrade the U.K.'s foreign language skills," Coussins says. "Otherwise our young people will continue to fall behind their European and global peers in education and employability; our export growth will be stunted; our international reputation will suffer, and our security, defense, and diplomacy needs will be compromised." APPG's call comes not long after university application statistics showed a five-percent decline in language candidates, while 2012 European Commission research estimated only nine-percent of 15-year-olds in Britain are proficient in their first foreign language compared to 42 percent in 14 other European countries. The U.K.'s next general elections are in 2015, and Coussins says, "We're looking for an acknowledgement of this issue in all the parties' manifestos for the next general election, backed up by some specific policy commitments."

From "Modern Languages 'Recovery Program' Urged by MPs"
BBC News (United Kingdom) (07/13/14) Richardson, Hannah
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California Bill Would Provide Needed Medical Interpreter Funding

Demand for medical interpreters far exceeds supply in California, in part because the state does not provide compensation for their services, but new legislation could change that. The lack of funding has led to situations in which non-English-speaking patients must rely on friends or relatives to interpret for them. The Affordable Care Act's expansion of medical coverage to an additional 2 million Californians is driving the need for interpreters at community clinics, and the new legislation aims to swell medical interpreters' ranks. The bill proposed by former State Speaker John Perez would set up CommuniCal, a system designed to improve Medi-Cal beneficiaries' access to interpreters at hospitals and physician offices throughout California. The state is home to the largest immigrant community in the U.S., and 40 percent of Californians speak a language other then English at home. For such residents, having medical interpreters on hand could mean the difference between life and death, according to state Assembly Member Rob Bonta. Community Health for Asian Americans' Sean Kirkpatrick says interpreter services are very important for patients with HIV, mental health problems, and other conditions that can stigmatize them, and for whom using friends or family for interpreting can be humiliating. He notes interpreting services are not "just about language alone, but the interpreter should be competent in social and cultural" issues. Meanwhile, interpreter Carlos Garcia says a bill providing funding for interpreters would create many opportunities for companies and professionals.

From "In California, Healthcare Is Often Lost for Lack of Translation"
New America Media (CA) (06/24/14) Sundaram, Viji
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UCLA Document Addresses Translation Issues in Chinese Medicine

Millions of people in the West today utilize traditional Chinese medicine, including acupuncture, herbs, massage, and nutritional therapies. Yet only a few U.S. schools that teach Chinese medicine require Chinese-language training, and only a handful of Chinese medical texts have been translated into English. Given the complexity of the language and concepts in these texts, there is a need for accurate, high-quality translations, say researchers at the Center for East-West Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). To that end, the center has published a document that includes a detailed discussion of the issues involved in Chinese medical translation. The 15-page document, "Considerations in the Translation of Chinese Medicine," was developed and written by a UCLA team that included a doctor, an anthropologist, a China scholar, and a translator. "This publication aims to raise awareness among the many stakeholders involved with the translation of Chinese medicine," says Ka-Kit Hui, the founder and director of Center for East–West Medicine, who served as the principal investigator and study author. Fellow authors Sonya Pritzker, a licensed Chinese medicine practitioner and anthropologist, and Hanmo Zhang, a China scholar, hope the publication will promote communication in the field and play a role in the development of thorough, accurate translation. The document highlights several important topics in the translation of Chinese medical texts, including the history of Chinese medical translation, terminology, period-specific language and style, and historical and cultural perspectives. The final section calls for further discussion and action, specifically in the development of international collaborative efforts geared toward the creation of more rigorous guidelines for the translation of Chinese medicine texts. The authors say the document was influenced in large part by the American Council of Learned Societies' "Guidelines for the Translation of Social Science Texts," which are intended to promote communication in the social sciences across language boundaries. Funded by a UCLA Transdisciplinary Seed Grant, "Considerations in the Translation of Chinese Medicine" is available for free in both English and Chinese on the center's website [http://cewm.med.ucla.edu].

From "UCLA Addresses 'Lost in Translation' Issues in Chinese Medicine"
UCLA Newsroom (CA) (07/02/14) Champeau, Rachel
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Gmail Gets Translations for 13 More Languages

Gmail users now can access translation support for an additional 13 languages, bringing the total number of languages available to 71. The expansion of the language translation services was announced by Ian Hill, senior project manager of Google Localization. The added languages are Afrikaans, Armenian, Azerbaijani (Azeri), Chinese (Hong Kong), French (Canada), Galician, Georgian, Khmer, Lao, Mongolian, Nepali, Sinhala, and Zulu. Some of the new languages now supported by Gmail had already been introduced previously as part of other Google services, including Google Search, Maps, Drive, Docs and YouTube. "E-mail is a universal way to communicate," says Hill. "No matter where you are, you can reach anyone else in the world with the press of a button. We take it for granted now, but it's so much easier to keep in touch with people than it was in the old days of pens, paper, and stamps." Hill explains that Gmail users employing the email service on the web or through smartphone browsers can access the additional languages by adjusting their Gmail account settings. Differences in regional and local use of words will show up in Gmail, such as the new Chinese (Hong Kong) character for "Inbox," which is different from the word used in Taiwan. Gmail will be able to take full advantage of Google's Translate services, which are updated regularly. Last December, Google added nine more languages--including five in Africa--to its roster. The month before, Google upgraded the speed and broadened the language coverage of its Google Translate app for Android-based devices. In addition, the latest version of Google Translate features more language support for the built-in handwriting feature, which now enables users to directly write words in Hebrew, Javanese, and Esperanto on their devices so they can be translated on the fly.

From "Gmail Gets Translations for 13 More Languages"
eWeek (NY) (07/08/14) Weiss, Todd R.
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Oregon Has a Shortage of Certified Medical Interpreters

Despite an Oregon law requiring the use of certified medical interpreters when treating non-English-speaking patients, low wages and few fully qualified interpreters means the services can be inadequate. In a recent case, a certified medical interpreter misinterpreted the Spanish word 'intoxicado' the family had used meaning their 18-year-old coma patient had ingested something, as 'intoxicated,' leading doctors to make an incorrect diagnosis of drug overdose. Brain hematomas actually caused the coma and the delayed diagnosis resulted in the boy becoming a quadriplegic. Although Tuality Hospital uses a phone service to provide qualified interpreters, they are working on providing more in-person interpreters and trying to reflect the rapidly changing demographics of their community. The hospital is cultivating interpreters by offering to pay the fees for staff to go through the certification process, but those who have become certified are not paid extra for their interpreting work. In other hospitals in Oregon, doctors disregard the law and rely on family members to interpret for patients. Experts say phone interpreters may confuse elderly patients or those who have difficulty hearing. According to a 2012 American College of Emergency Physicians study, professional interpreters had a 12-percent error rate versus 22 percent for ad hoc interpreters. Those with at least 100 hours of training had an error rate of just 2 percent. Efforts to increase the available training, languages, and number of interpreters are ongoing.

From "Oregon Has a Shortage of Certified Medical Interpreters"
OPB.org (OR) (07/11/14) Foden-Vencil, Kristian
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States Encourage Bilingualism With Diploma Seals

Several states with dual-language programs have established a pilot honors project whereby graduates receive diplomas featuring an embossed seal certifying their bilingualism. California, New Mexico, Washington, Illinois, Louisiana, and Oregon are among the states that are recognizing and rewarding bilingual education. Martinez-Regan, who recently graduated from Oregon's Corvallis High School, says her school's bilingual program was academically challenging, but is confident that it will give her career plans a boost. "I'm thinking of becoming a lawyer to give the Spanish-speaking community a voice," says Martinez-Regan, who did not speak Spanish before enrolling in the program. She will attend Yale University this fall. Dual-language programs have gained in popularity across the country as employers seek bilingual, bicultural workers, and more parents view bilingualism as necessary for their children's success in a globalized world. Such programs are offered in Spanish, Mandarin, Vietnamese, and Russian, among other languages, and many have waiting lists. Enrolled students take literacy and academic subjects in a foreign language for at least part of the school day. Experts say dual programs and the languages they teach reflect the nation's growing diversity and the fact that students who speak a language other than English at home are among America's fastest-growing populations. According to the Maryland-based National Association for Bilingual Education (NABE), the number of dual-language programs, which bring together native English students and English learners in one classroom, expanded from about 260 nationwide in 2000 to about 3,000 today. California, the first state to adopt a biliteracy seal two years ago, has granted more than 30,000 diplomas with seals to students. State records show the seals recognize more than 40 languages. NABE Director Santiago Wood sums up the trend, saying "American parents are coming to the conclusion that the lives and the economic opportunities of their children are tied to being bilingual."


From "States Encourage Bilingualism With Diploma Seals"
Associated Press (NY) (06/28/14) Wozniacka, Gosia
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Study Finds Babies Develop Ear for Native Language as They Grow

Researchers at the University of Washington may be a step closer to unraveling the mystery of how babies learn how to speak. In a study conducted on a group of 7- and 11-month-old infants, they found that a key part of the brain involved in forming speech is active in babies as they listen to voices around them. During the study, researchers had the infants listen to a series of syllables while sitting in a brain scanner. Using a technique called magnetoencephalography, or MEG, they were able to measure tiny magnetic fields generated by the firing of neurons in each baby's brain. Not only did the auditory areas of their brains light up as expected, but so did a region crucial to forming higher-level speech, called Broca's area. These findings may suggest that even before babies utter their first words, they may be mentally exercising the pivotal parts of their brains in preparation for speech. Researchers also threw a non-native language into the mix to see how babies' perception of speech sounds change as they grow. They looked at brain activation of the infants, all from English-only-speaking homes, while listening to a series of Spanish syllables. As expected, a seven-month-old's brain reacted the same way when hearing both English and Spanish. In a second experiment with MEG, researchers used Finnish-learning infants with Mandarin Chinese as the non-native language. The results were similar to the English-Spanish study. The older infants studied were more stimulated by their native language for the auditory regions of the brain. Study author and neuroscientist Patricia Kuhl says that her results reinforce the belief that talking and reading to babies from birth is beneficial for their language development, along with exaggerated speech and mouth movements. "Understand that they want to talk with you, so give them a chance to talk back," she says.

From "Babies Grasp Speech Before They Utter Their First Word, Study Finds"
Washington Post (DC) (07/20/14) Kim, Meeri
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Colorado Courts Cope With Language Explosion

The recent shortage of Arabic-speaking interpreters needed in two court cases in Aurora, Colorado, underlined the need for more skilled interpreters in U.S. courts. Prosecutors had nearly wrapped up their case against a man accused of robbing six Iraqi immigrants in Aurora when the judge announced that the pair of Arabic interpreters assigned to the case was needed in another courtroom. Without an interpreter, the sixth Iraqi would not get to tell his story. "It was just absurd to me that this was a possibility in this case," says Deputy District Attorney Kyle McCarthy. "Luckily, in large part thanks to the interpreters realizing that this was an important trial for them to be at, they rearranged their schedule." McCarthy and fellow Deputy District Attorney Todd Bluth won convictions in the 2013 case, but the experience impressed upon them not just the need for more skilled interpreters, but the challenges of pursuing justice in an increasingly diverse America. According to the Office of Language Access, which provides interpreters to the Colorado courts, interpreters are called upon to handle more than 200 languages. Not so long ago, the Office's staff of interpreters and translators handled about 50 languages. To meet the demand, the office's spending has increased from just over $2-million in 2003 to more than $4-million in the past decade. The 18th Judicial District near Denver is among the busiest for interpreters, with about 100 requests per month for languages other than Spanish. The 18th District includes Aurora, one of Colorado's most diverse cities. "It's important to realize that this is going to be an issue, and it's a much bigger issue than people realize," says Bluth.

From "Colorado Courts Cope With Language Explosion"
Pueblo Chieftain (CO) (07/06/14) Bryson, Donna
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Researchers Develop System for Translating Patents in Real Time

Spanish researchers at the Polytechnic University of Catalonia's Center for Language and Speech Technologies have developed a prototype of an automatic translation system capable of translating biomedical patents between three languages in real-time. The prototype is able to translate not just the text of the patent, but also the images, formulae, and other annotations while retaining the patent's structure. The project is part of a broader effort by European researchers to develop automatic translation systems. Researchers involved in the effort, called MOLTO, are working to create technologies that can automatically translate mathematical exercises, descriptions of objects in museums, and patents. The biomedical patent translator uses the Grammatical Framework technique being used by MOLTO researchers, as well as statistical techniques similar to those used by machine translators like Google Translate. The translator can translate patents in real time between English, French, and German. A built-in application programming interface (API) also allows the tool to be used with any Web application, and it is currently being tested on a document recovery system that was initially only capable of searching English-language documents.

From "Development of an Automatic System for Translating Biomedical Patents in Real Time"
Polytechnic University of Catalonia (Spain) (07/17/14)
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Translators Essential to Overseas Appeal of Korean Literature

Since 2011, Korean literary works have been slowly gaining ground in the international scene. A number of factors have been cited as contributing to the growing interest in Korean literature abroad. The first is a change in the topics covered. Whereas literary works previously introduced abroad were mostly concerned with the Korean War, the national division, democratization, and the ideological divide, more recent works deal with universal themes with which readers around the world can empathize and appreciate. Excellent translation is another crucial element for the success of literary works on foreign shores. When Kyung-sook Shin's "Please Look After Mom" received international acclaim, much was said about the high quality of the translation by Kim Chi-young. Before the success of "Please Look After Mom," little had been said about translators and their work. Yet, the importance of translators is not lost on writers and critics. Many of the Korean authors who participated in the London Book Fair in April pointed out the need for good translation. Speaking at a meeting with the Korean press in London, author Hwang Sok-yong was quoted as citing the lack of skilled translators who can "properly translate Korean literary works into English" as the "biggest handicap in the globalization of Korean literature." Another literary heavyweight, Yi Mun-yol, agreed, saying that the biggest problem may be the problem of translation. This point was reiterated by Kim Seong-kon, the president of the Literature Translation Institute of Korea, who, in the opening remarks at the 13th International Workshop for Translation and Publication of Korean Literature, said: "For Korean authors to gain international acclaim, skilled translators, renowned publishers, and competent literary agents are indispensable." In such a competitive atmosphere, the role of translators as advocates for authors and their works is becoming increasingly important. Tracy Fisher, of the U.S.-based WME Agency, agrees. "A quality translator needs to be attached to the author at the earliest stage, and the translator can act as a scout, contacting agents and sending out samples." So, what are the literary genres that Korea should look to export?" Mystery, thriller, and suspense novels can most easily break out in other languages," Fisher explains, noting the popularity of Nordic and Italian mysteries as an example.

From "Lost in Translation?"
Korea Herald (South Korea) (06/26/14) Hoo-ran, Kim
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ATA News


ATA Board of Directors: Meeting Summary July 12-13, 2014

The ATA Board of Directors met July 12-13 in Palm Springs, California. A summary of the meeting’s actions, discussions, and ongoing committee work is now online in the Governance area of the ATA website.

The ATA Board meets four times a year to establish policy, develop goals and objectives, review emerging trends and issues, monitor Annual Conference planning, hear committee reports, and oversee Association finances. To learn more about the association’s governance, click How ATA Works

ATA Election 2014: Final Slate of Candidates

ATA will hold its regularly scheduled election at the Association's 55th Annual Conference in Chicago, Illinois (November 5-8, 2014).

The slate is set for this year’s election of three directors for three-year terms. Since the announcement of the slate put forward by the Nominating and Leadership Development Committee, Robert Sette petitioned successfully to join the other candidates. The final slate is:

Directors (three positions, three-year terms)
Anne Connor
Chris Durban
Melinda Gonzalez-Hibner
Geoff Koby
Madalena Sánchez Zampaulo
Robert Sette
Marjon van den Bosch

Candidate statements and photos will appear in the September issue of The ATA Chronicle and on ATA’s website.

The ATA Savvy Newcomer Celebrates First Anniversary

One year ago, the ATA Savvy Newcomer stepped into the role of a trusted advisor and ready resource for translators and interpreters just getting started. Along the way, the blog has become a favorite read for veterans of the profession who find fresh perspectives in the "do this, don't do that" advice to newbies.

Take a look back at some of this first year's posts. If you're not already a reader of The Savvy Newcomer, please consider giving it a try. You can sign up for new posts on the blog's home page, or if Twitter is your method for news, look for the blog at twitter.com/SavvyNewcomer.

Choose the ATA Annual Conference Hotel

  • Win a Free Night's Stay at the Conference Hotel
    Five lucky winners will receive one free night at the Sheraton Chicago! Reservations made before November 3 will automatically be entered to win. Winners will be announced at the Closing Session on Saturday, November 8 at 5:15pm. You do not have to be present to win.

    Don't wait! Make your reservation online now.
  • ATA Annual Conference Hotel Room Rate Reduction
    The Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers is offering ATA conference attendees one additional incentive to stay in the hotel. The rate for a double room has been reduced from $254 to $234.

    Don't wait! Make your reservation online now.
Exhibit and Sponsor

There is no better way to target the buyers in your market than with an exhibit or sponsorship at this year's ATA Annual Conference.

Exhibit space is selling quickly, with more than 70% of available booth space now sold! Reserve your booth soon--or your competition will beat you to it. Several sponsorships remain open. Take advantage of this once-a-year opportunity to prominently promote your brand within the language industry. And don’t forget that conference program ads are an excellent, targeted way to get your message to potential buyers.If you have any questions, please contact Caron Mason at caron@atanet.org or (703) 683-6100 ext. 3003

Coming Up in the August Issue of The ATA Chronicle

Legal Translator Liability: Some Myths and Realities
Here is an explanation of the basic tenets of the law governing translator liability and why legal translators are probably less vulnerable than they think. (Thomas B. Mann)

"Power" Words for Interpreters and Language Services Providers
The proper use of “power” words can improve the public’s perception of professional interpreters by portraying interpreting as a rigorous, intellectually demanding endeavor. (David L. Lauman)

Whatever Could Be Said: Interpreting at Nuremberg
How an unprecedented and expeditious method of interpreting made the Nuremberg trials possible. (Ewandro Magalhães)

A Strategy for Expressing Arabic Diglossic Elements in English
When translating from a language that exhibits diglossia, such as Arabic, into one that does not, such as English, it is important to analyze each dialectal element individually and to decide if it should be expressed in the target language and, if so, how best to express it. (Carmen Cross)

Online access to The ATA Chronicle archives is included with your association membership. And don't forget to check out the latest issue of the magazine in flipbook and PDF formats!


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