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ATA 53rd Annual Conference San Diego
 

CalPro US-Style


How much do you really know about your business—operating costs? average hourly rate? target income? CalPro is a free spreadsheet that can put it all together for you, from costs to earnings to income. This is way more than a budget. Just plug your numbers into the five interrelated worksheets, and you get a thorough assessment of your business, not someone else's and not an "I thought I would make" income.

It's this kind of top-to-bottom analysis that will show you the number of hours you need to work to earn the salary you want to make. And it's a tool that allows you to ask yourself "what if" I lowered costs or worked more hours or changed my rates.

Originally created for the European market and the Spanish Translators, Copy-Editors, and Interpreters Association (ASETRAD), CalPro has now been Americanized. The development of the U.S. version was led by ATA's Board of Directors and carried out by a group of ATA volunteers eager to bring it to this side of the Atlantic. It's available as a free download from the ATA website. Check it out!

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Association for Machine Translation in the Americas (AMTA)
 

Headlines


Industry News
Universal Speech Translator App Ready for Olympics
New York Times Launches Chinese Language Website
Quebec Court Decisions Lack English Translations
AMA Calls for Pharmacies to Offer Interpreter Services
Language Rules Violate European Workers' Rights
Local Language Support Could Drive Indian Web Use
China Moves to Standardize Use of Foreign Words
Tennessee Now Provides Interpreting for Victims in Court
How Some Movies Wind Up With Lousy Subtitles
Automatic Translator Could End Language Barrier in Lectures
Google Translate Makes Translating More Efficient

ATA News
ATA Annual Conference Program Now Online
ATA Webinar: Documenting Terms, Once and For All
Google Translate Humor
Did You Take the Survey?
No Better Way to Target Your Market
Get Ready to Go Mobile in San Diego
Coming Up in the August Issue of The ATA Chronicle

Industry News


Universal Speech Translator App Ready for Olympics

The 2012 Olympic Games in London will serve as the test bed for a new iPhone app that will enable users to converse with foreign visitors in their own language. VoiceTra4U-M supports full speech-to-text translation for 13 different languages and text translation only for 10 additional languages. Users can share a single iPhone to speak face-to-face or make phone calls to anyone using the app. The translation takes place on remote servers, which can introduce a slight delay to the conversation during the translation process. The app runs on a completely open platform, meaning that any country can run its own server to provide translations for its local language and up to five people can converse at once, each in their own language. VoiceTra4U-M was developed by the Universal Speech Translation Advanced Research Consortium, which is made up of researchers from 23 different countries. The app will soon be available for free from Apple's online App Store.

From "Universal Speech Translator App Ready for Olympics"
New Scientist (United Kingdom) (06/27/12) Aron, Jacob
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New York Times Launches Chinese Language Website

In a plan to reach out to more international readers, the New York Times recently debuted its Chinese-language website cn.nytimes.com. The Times says the site is designed to attract the "educated, affluent, global citizens" who constitute China's expanding middle class. The online publication will provide 30 daily articles on topics of national and international interest, as well as a number of editorials. According to Joseph Kahn, the paper's foreign editor, about 66 percent of the site's content will be translated from articles published in the print edition of the newspaper or carried on the Times main website, and 33 percent will be authored by Chinese editors and freelance journalists. Times staff members posted in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong Kong will be the major contributors to the site. Thirty new employees, who are mainly translators and editors, have also been hired. Although the Chinese government has occasionally blocked articles from nytimes.com in the past, Kahn hopes it will be receptive to the new online initiative. "We're not tailoring it to the demands of the Chinese government, so we're not operating like a Chinese media company," Kahn notes. "China operates a very vigorous firewall. We have no control over that. We hope and expect that Chinese officials will welcome what we're doing." Times chief advertising officer Denise F. Warren says the Chinese-language website will not initially charge readers for content. "That's something that potentially down the road we contemplate," she says. "We have to give this the opportunity to flourish first."

From "The Times Is Introducing a Chinese-Language News Site"
New York Times (NY) (06/27/12) Haughney, Christine
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Quebec Court Decisions Lack English Translations

There is no requirement for judicial decisions made in Quebec to be translated into English, and as a result, the effectiveness of Canada's legal system is being compromised, says Attorney Stéphane Eljarrat. Under Quebec's language law, legal proceedings in the province may be conducted in English or French, but, with few exceptions, there is no obligation for the courts to provide translations of their judgments. "Decisions rendered in French are rarely translated, so the rest of Canada doesn't benefit from them," says Eljarrat. The failure to translate decisions in cases of national interest is of particular concern. In the recent Global Fuels case, the Quebec Superior Court issued its interpretation of a newly expanded Canadian law that dictated the criminal liability of corporations. "When the decision came out a few weeks ago, I had a number of lawyers across Canada emailing and asking for the English version of the decision, but it simply wasn't available," Eljarrat notes. "Until someone takes it upon themselves to translate it, that won't change, and even when someone does, it will be an unofficial version." Eljarrat recalls another time when a colleague in a criminal case before the Supreme Court of Canada was unaware of the only existing Canadian ruling on the point in issue. The decision handed down by the Quebec Court of Appeal had never been translated into English. Eljarrat says, "I emailed the lawyer saying I would be happy to explain the decision to him, but he told me not to bother because he had converted the reasons to English using Google’s translation software.” Sébastien Grammond, dean of the Civil Law Section of the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law, agrees that Canada's legal system is being shortchanged by the failure to translate rulings. "There are many cases that could be useful that are not being translated," Grammond says. "Lawyers in common law provinces have a tendency not to search Quebec cases, partly because they assume they're in French and partly because there's an attitude that most Quebec cases must be irrelevant because the legal system is totally different than in the English-speaking provinces."

From "Court Decisions May Be Lost in Translation"
National Post (Canada) (07/18/12) Melnitzer, Julius
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AMA Calls for Pharmacies to Offer Interpreter Services

The American Medical Association recently adopted a policy encouraging pharmacies to provide interpreting services for non-English-speaking and hearing-impaired patients. Previously, AMA has stressed the importance of providing interpreting services in hospitals in order to ensure proper and appropriate care for non-English-speaking patients. “AMA already believes that offering these services is important, and it is clear that understanding medical instructions, including, but not limited to, medical dosage and timing are all essential elements in providing health care services,” says Bethany Bush, a regional medical student delegate for the West Virginia State Medical Association. Hospitals and physicians receiving federal funds are required by law to provide interpreting services. At its Annual Meeting in June, AMA approved a resolution to seek legislation to extend interpreting requirements to pharmacies and to provide financial compensation for these services, alleviating hospitals, physicians, and pharmacists of the additional financial burden. In addition, the resolution encourages the publication of patient assessment tools, such as the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, in multiple languages, as well as a validation process to ensure that the tools are translated properly.

From "AMA Calls for Pharmacies to Offer Interpreter Services"
American Medical News (IL) (07/02/12) Dolan, Pamela Lewis
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Language Rules Violate European Workers' Rights

Advocate General Niilo Jääskinen, an adviser to EU's Court of Justice, has issued his opinion in a case involving a local language requirement and an international corporation. When Dutch citizen Anton Las lost his job in 2009, he sued his employer PSA Antwerp, arguing that because his employment contract and dismissal letter had been written in English, the documents violated the Flemish Decree on Use of Languages and should be voided. Las contended he was therefore entitled to a better severance compensation called for under Belgian employment law. The Flemish language decree requires the use of Dutch in all employment matters between employees and employers, when the employer's established place of business is in Flanders. (PSA Antwerp is part of a multinational group with headquarters in Singapore.) Although EU law does not address the use of language in employment documents, the case was referred to the EU high court for a decision. In his legal review, Advocate General Jääskinen concluded that requiring international corporations to comply with the language decree would infringe on a worker's basic right to free movement within the EU. He rejected the Belgian government's argument that the language requirement protected the Flemish region's employees, noting that the mandate only protected its Dutch-speaking citizens. Effective protection, he said, would cover all employees working in the region and would require employment contracts to be accessible in whatever language the employee easily understands so that consent would be fully informed. Jääskinen summarized his opinion: "A national or regional measure seeking to impose exclusive monolingualism to the effect that languages of other member states cannot be used in a given field does not seem to me to be legitimate in the light of the principles of EU law."

From "Language Rules Violate Euro Workers' Rights"
Courthouse News Service (CA) (07/12/12) Dotinga, William
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Local Language Support Could Drive Indian Web Use

If the double challenges of technology and content can be addressed, the next phase in the expansion of India's Web usage will come from new users who are more comfortable with local languages. The potential for growth is huge: less than eight percent of India's 1.2 billion people currently access the Internet. Yahoo India estimates that local language users are growing by nearly 40 percent a year. The company is now offering email services in eight Indian regional languages and has partnered with Indian newspapers Dinanalat and Lokmar for co-branded websites in Tamil and Marathi. "[These partners] have the local knowledge, reporters, and editors who understand the nuances in the language," says Yahoo India's Nitin Mathur. In the past, technology has been a major roadblock to getting more Indians on the Web. The scripts for Indian languages are more complicated than those written in the Roman alphabet, making keyboards a tough problem to solve. A start-up company, Luna Ergonomics, may have an answer with the development of its Panini Keypad. The keypad will allow users to send text messages and operate their phone in any one of 26 Indian languages. "Because it's a dynamic keypad with no printed characters on the keypad, it's not restricted to any form—you can use it on the phone, the ATM machine, or the remote of your IPTV," says Luna CEO Abhijit Bhattacharjee. Meanwhile, two software giants are looking to establish their presence in the fast-growing Indian market. Microsoft, whose operating system software supported only Hindi and Tamil in the past, upgraded Windows 2000 to operate in 12 Indian languages, and Adobe expanded their InDesign program to 10 Indian languages. Finding content for what some are calling the "Indic Web" is equally difficult. The Wikimedia Foundation is attempting to fill the gap with plans to develop Wikipedia in 25 Indian languages. Summing up the future, technology analyst Prasanto Kumar Roy says the Internet could enjoy an explosion in India similar to what happened with TV, but only if companies provide enough local content or convince more government services to go online in regional languages.

From "Is Language Key to Hooking India on the Web?"
BBC News (United Kingdom) (07/08/12) Kannan, Shilpa
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China Moves to Standardize Use of Foreign Words

The Chinese government wants to clarify and standardize commonly used foreign terms, many of them English. Although many foreign words and names are commonly used, there is often confusion about their proper meaning, pronunciation, and use. For example, many Chinese citizens do not know whether the U.S. Secretary of State is properly referred to as “Secretary Clinton” or “Secretary Hillary.” A commission of more than 10 government agencies, including the Foreign Ministry, Radio and Television Bureau, and Chinese Academy of Sciences, will create guidelines for these foreign words and names. In addition, more than 200 foreign terms that "influence common people's lives" will be added to the newest edition of the Contemporary Chinese Dictionary, according to its publisher. Additions will include the abbreviation for consumer price index, CPI, and an air pollution measurement, PM 2.5. The dictionary's fifth edition, published in 2002, also included transliterations such as "ku" for "cool" and "heike" for "hacker." The dictionary, first published in 1978, was updated in 1983 during the Reform and Opening Campaign to remove political terms that originated during the Cultural Revolution.


From "China Moves to Regulate Use of Foreign Words"
Asian Correspondent (United Kingdom) (07/04/12) Evans, Michael
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Tennessee Now Provides Interpreting for Victims in Court

The Tennessee court system has complied with a federal mandate to provide all non-English-speaking crime victims with free interpreting services during state court proceedings. "It is important that not only those charged with a crime, but also crime victims, divorcing parents, and all those who find themselves before the courts are able to communicate effectively," says Tennessee Supreme Court Chief Justice Cornelia A. Clark. "We are one of the first states to take this much-needed initiative that will benefit the many diverse people that interact with our courts." U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder sent advisories to all states in 2010 informing them that they must provide free interpreting services to all parties in legal proceedings or face a possible withdrawal of federal funding. Previously, Tennessee has only covered the costs of interpreting services for indigent defendants and witnesses as they testified in court. Although the Tennessee legislature approved $2 million to expand interpreting services, drafts of the proposed rule changes revealed that the inclusion of victims had not been anticipated, prompting Nashville Assistant District Attorney General Rob McGuire to lobby for the change. The revision, which went into effect on July 1, falls in line with a 2008 Supreme Court initiative to enhance the user-friendliness of Tennessee's court system.

From "TN Now Provides Translation for Victims in Court"
The Tennessean (TN) (07/10/12) Haas, Brian
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How Some Movies Wind Up With Lousy Subtitles

Subtitles for foreign films are typically contracted out by film studios—sometimes resulting in mistranslations that reflect poorly on the studio and detract from the film's artistic value. Those who view foreign films may encounter subtitles with typos, grammatical errors, and strange translation choices that may be so misleading that they alter the film's meaning. Some film producers are not willing to invest the time and money needed to get quality translations for subtitled versions of films. Boutique DVD label Masters of Cinema uses a post-production company in London that has a team of professional translators, and is willing to pay for their services to attract business from cinephiles. "We have a budgetary allotment for the fact that this has to be done right," says Masters of Cinema producer Craig Keller. "A lot of companies don't have that." In other cases, subtitles are based on dubbed versions of the original dialogue. For example, in a DVD set of Akira Kurosawa films that has been widely mocked for its poor subtitles, analysts speculate that the subtitles were based on a Chinese-dubbed dialogue rather than the original Japanese lines. For example, an original British Film Institute subtitle said, "I saw an old woman in the Forest," which was changed to "I met a monster in the spider bush." Another subtitle was changed from "Keep away from me, you stink" to "Get away, you are of cropse smell." Keller says he inspects all subtitles, and enlists the help of multilingual colleagues before a DVD goes to print. Keller says that plenty of subtitlers do great work, but that great work can easily go unnoticed simply because the best subtitles are the ones that make viewers forget they are reading subtitles in the first place. Ensuring that you get a quality product, Keller says, is all about the way you provide it. "It just comes down to a conscientious approach, which some companies do have," says Keller. "A lot don't."

From "More Than Words: How Some Movies Wind Up With Lousy Subtitles"
NPR Online (DC) (06/28/12) Wagner, David
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Automatic Translator Could End Language Barrier in Lectures

According to Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Professor Alex Waibel, a student's difficulty in understanding a lecture in a foreign language could soon become a thing of the past. Waibel has co-developed a simultaneous translation computer program which students can use to access real-time translation of lectures on their laptops. Slides and presentations can also be translated along with the lecture, although the results occur when the lecturer runs PowerPoint presentation and other teaching aids through the translator before the lecture. Waibel says, "There's tremendous potential for this." He notes that many students in the classroom are interested in translating from English into their native language. In a more general sense, the translator program could become a vital tool in making Karlsruhe and other German institutions more appealing to international students, possibly even allowing some of the schools to eliminate language requirements if the translator program becomes reliable enough. Waibel acknowledges that the program is not error free, but he argues that "if you imagine being in a lecture and understanding nothing, then a little awkwardness is worth it."

From "New Automatic Translator Could End Language Barrier in Lectures"
Chronicle of Higher Education (DC) (06/27/12) Labi, Aisha
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Google Translate Makes Translating More Efficient

Google Scientist Ashish Venugopal says Google Translate is making progress in helping businesses operate in a world with increasingly blurry geographical borders. For instance, the percentage of Chinese web content has grown over the past 10 years to 22.6% today. "When the web is changing like this, and when there's content being produced in all languages, it becomes even more important that we can all understand the content that's being produced," Venugopal notes. Google Translate employs statistical machine translation that relies on information published on the web in multiple languages, so that the machine matches word and phrase patterns occurring between languages. Google Translate translated between English, German, and Spanish in 2006, but it has since expanded to include 64 languages. "It's trying to learn how to generally do translations for all pairs of languages, as opposed to a company sitting down and saying, 'I just want to do translation for this pair of languages,'" Venugopal says. He also notes Google Translate can adapt to the way people talk over time because it "learns from what people use on the Web." The service is not immune to error, so Google Translate enables users to contribute feedback to the system by letting them select alternative translations for different words. "Right now, our goal in machine translation is ... to provide you the meaning that used to exist in the original language," Venugopal says. Many professional translators and interpreters believe that online translation services will put a dent in their market value, but Venugopal says this concern is unfounded. He explains that Google Translate is built upon human translation, and that the service is complementary to professional translation.

From "Translating Research Into Business Solutions"
Singapore Business Times (Singapore) (06/30/12) Loh, Timothy
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ATA News


ATA Annual Conference Program Now Online

The ATA Annual Conference Program is online! Go online now to review the program, session abstracts, events, and speakers, and register today get the best bargain. And don't forget to make your hotel reservation while rooms are still available!
ATA Webinar: Documenting Terms, Once and For All

Presenter: Barbara Inge Karsch
Date: August 14
Time: 12 Noon U.S. Eastern Time
Duration: 60 minutes
CE Point(s): 1

Finding just the right words for your target language is not always easy. If you've done the work once, do you really want to do it all over again? Make your research an investment in your business! Attend this 60-minute ATA webinar to learn how to document terms and parts of speech so that you can retrieve the information for all your jobs, no matter what terminology tool you use.

Previous ATA webinars have sold out in advance. Please register now while space is still available.

On Demand! More than 25 ATA recorded webinars are now available online. Click to check out the online library.
Google Translate Humor

Word humor is the point of the weekly Style Invitational column published in The Washington Post, and Google translation—or mistranslation—was the subject of its June 24 contest. Readers were asked to have Google translate an English passage of their own choosing into another language, have the program translate that passage back into English, and then laugh over how wrong the back translation turned out to be.

Translators have always known how funny Google translations can be. Now the rest of the world knows as well. Click the link below to see Style Invitational's contest wrap-up of winners and honorable mentions.
Did You Take the Survey?

The 2012 ATA Member Survey is now underway. This is your opportunity to weigh in on your membership experience and the value of the Association's current benefits.

Open to ATA members only. Check your email inbox—or your spam folder—for your survey participation link.

The survey will close August 15, 2012.
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No Better Way to Target Your Market

There is still time to be part of the 53rd Annual ATA Annual Conference. The conference is a once-a-year opportunity to let translators, interpreters, language services providers, educators, and government agencies know about your company. Whether you want to reach more than 11,000 ATA members or 1,800 ATA Conference attendees, there is no better way to target the buyers in your market.

Print Advertising

Final Program

Distributed onsite to more than 1,800 Conference attendees. The Final Program, which is referenced repeatedly during the four-day event, is the attendees' guide to the schedule of sessions, meetings, and receptions.

Onsite Promotion

Exhibiting
A high-energy showcase for your company's products and services. Connect with new buyers and meet face-to-face with long-time customers. Act now to get an early registration discount on exhibitor booth space.

Sponsorship
Select opportunities to stand out from the competition. Several levels of sponsorship provide a variety of ways to increase your company's visibility and success.

Tote Insert
Guaranteed to get your company's name in front of attendees. Provide a promotional item to be included in the Conference totebag. The "totes," which are part of the registration check-in package, are a popular Conference take-away.

For more information on how you can be a part of the ATA Annual Conference, please visit http://www.atanet.org/conf/2012/advertise.htm.
Get Ready to Go Mobile in San Diego

A free app will put this year's ATA Annual Conference in your pocket and at your fingertips—browse the program, create a personal schedule, view handouts and slides, receive program updates, contact colleagues, use an interactive Exhibit Hall map, view company descriptions and websites, set up meetings, find places to eat, and more. Available in mid September to registered attendees.
Coming Up in the August Issue of The ATA Chronicle

Tips for an Interpreter-Friendly Presentation
Interpreting quality will improve greatly if some basic precautions are taken and all parties involved are aware of the necessity for an interpreter. ( Ewandro Magalhães)

How to Succeed as a Freelance Translator: A Review
There is no magic button to press (or wand to wave) that will make you a successful translator, but this smart, 200-page book will tell you just about everything you need to know to set yourself up for success. (Judy Jenner, Dagmar Jenner)

Translator on the Roof
At what point was a grunt just not good enough, prompting one of our ancestors to articulate a sound that was inextricably linked to a specific meaning? (Tony Beckwith)

Research Techniques for French into English Legal Translation
The challenges legal translators of French into English face are exacerbated by the complex nature of law in general and legal writing in particular. Check out some of these valuable resources the next time you find yourself in a difficult translation corner. (Cynthia L. Hazelton)

Online access to The ATA Chronicle is included with your association membership. View the latest issues in PDF for articles that can give you a heads up on ideas, tools, and new ways of doing business.

And don't forget The Chronicle archives! ATA members have login access to every back issue from February 2000 to the present. Visit The ATA Chronicle Archives and log in.

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