SESSIONS BY SPECIALIZATION

ATA58 offers sessions that focus on 15 specializations, plus sessions of other languages that are related to these specializations. Select a specialization below to see what sessions are offered.

  • ATA-certified translators may earn one CEP for each hour attended, up to a maximum of 10 CEPs. Learn more
  • Certified interpreters may earn continuing education credit. Learn more

Make your selection:
ATA Activities Education & Training
Financial Translation Government T&I
Interpreting Independent Contractors
Literary Translation Legal T&I
Language Services Companies Language Technology
Medical T&I Science & Technology
Translation T&I Industry
Terminology Varia




 

ATA Activities
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ATA-1 The ATA Code of Ethics and Professional Practice: What Does It Mean to Me?
Ted Wozniak, CT | Mike Collins | Jutta Diel-Dominique | Odile Legeay | Jill Sommer
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

ATA members are required to comply with the Association’s code of ethics. Historically, failure to comply had no consequence, as complaints were routinely dismissed. Following revision of the ethics procedures in 2014, this is no longer true. Ethical violations now have consequences. So how do you ensure compliance? What should you do if an ethics violation occurs? How will complaints be handled? Members of ATA’s Ethics Committee will discuss the code, the related commentary, and the ethics policy, highlighting recent changes. The speakers will then take questions from attendees, providing their opinions or interpretation in a particular scenario.


ATA-2 A Step-by-Step Manual: How to Give a School Outreach Presentation and Tips for Capturing a Winning Photo
Meghan McCallum | Molly Yurick
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

School by school, class by class, ATA members have shared their careers in ways that have captured the imagination of students everywhere, from elementary schools to universities. Telling the real-world stories of translators and interpreters is as exciting as it is important. Attend this session for a step-by-step guide to making a School Outreach presentation. We’ll include presentation content, pointers for overcoming nerves, and tips on how to capture a winning photo for the annual School Outreach Contest. Remember, the photography contest winner gets a free registration to next year’s ATA Annual Conference!


ATA-3 ATA’s Certification Exam: Questions and Answers
David Stephenson, CT | Caron Mason
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will be of interest to attendees seeking a better understanding of ATA’s certification exam and program. The speakers will discuss the nature of the exam, assessment criteria, and upcoming changes in the program. They will answer questions about certification policies and procedures and give tips on how to prepare for the exam.


ATA Activities
Related Sessions

C-1 Lessons Learned from Grading ATA Practice Tests

I-12 Interpreting Meets Transcreation in the Portuguese Version of Interpreting: Getting It Right

 

Education & Training
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ET-1 The Evolving Curriculum in Interpreter and Translator Education: A Preview
Frank Austermühl | Vanessa Enriquez Raido | David Sawyer
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

This session will offer a preview of the paper “The Evolving Curriculum in Interpreter and Translator Education,” set to appear in the ATA Scholarly Monograph Series. Since the emergence of university curricula in the mid-twentieth century, the evolution of the professions and changes in teaching practices have led to fundamental shifts in how knowledge and skills are acquired. Written by noted stakeholders in interpreter and translator education, including leaders of academic programs, employer organizations, and professional associations, this paper describes the impact of evolutionary forces on the conceptual foundations and frameworks of translator and interpreter education.


ET-2 Collaborative and Situated Translator Training: Moving Toward Transcollaboration, Part I
Maria González-Davies
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Implementing both collaborative scaffolding projects and real-life professional projects that involve teaming up lecturers and students with professional translators increases mutual understanding, efficiency, and quality. Transcollaboration benefits all agents because synergies are established between experience and innovation. Situated and collaborative learning offer an informed pedagogical framework to: a) implement professionally-oriented instruction; b) adapt the instruction to different contexts; and c) enable professionals and academics to work together in a potentially win-win situation. Attendees are invited to bring along their own successful learning materials to share and discuss.


ET-3 Collaborative and Situated Translator Training: Moving Toward Transcollaboration, Part II
Maria González-Davies
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

See abstract for ET-2: Collaborative and Situated Translator Training: Moving Toward Transcollaboration, Part I


ET-4 SIMinar: Interpreting Theory Meets Real Life
Franz Pöchhacker
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Conference interpreter training faces a two-fold tension between classroom and market needs, and between theory and practice. In line with the vocational orientation, trainers have brought classroom exercises closer to professional realities by using real-life speeches and staging mock conferences. At the same time, programs positioned at the postgraduate university level also include a theoretical component, often in the form of lectures or seminars. This session will show how potential gaps between training and market needs and between theory and practice in the curriculum can be filled with a SIMinar, a multifunctional course developed and tested at the University of Vienna.


ET-5 CANCELLED
Interpreter Training for Heritage Speakers: A Model for Developing Competence
Aida Martinez-Gomez
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)




ET-6 The Nuts and Bolts of Remote Interpreting and Training: The Tech You Need and Why You Need It
Katharine Allen | Barry Olsen
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The way humans communicate has changed. Rapid technological advancements brought on by wireless connectivity and new smart devices have moved multilingual communication into the cloud. Interpreting teaching and practice is running to keep up. As interpreting and interpreter training move increasingly online, how do you adapt? What technologies must you understand and have access to if you want to interpret, teach, or learn online? Join us for this hands-on session that will demystify the technologies used to interpret and train interpreters online. You will leave this session with the knowledge to participate in this growing area of professional practice and training.


ET-7 Benefits of Engaging Translation Students with Refugee Communities
Laurence Jay-Rayon Ibrahim Aibo
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

How do you design a course with the goal of engaging translation students with the needs of the refugee communities around them? What are the pedagogical benefits of such a course? How does it make students better translators? What are the benefits for the refugee population? This session will draw on the speaker’s experience designing and teaching a community-engaged French translation course with the International Rescue Committee as a partner. During the course, students translated 60 pages of cultural orientation materials into French for Congolese refugees. The speaker will discuss the long-term benefits of such partnerships for translator education.


ET-8 NEW SESSION
Translation Project Management in the Virtual Classroom: Enhancement of Student Engagement through Task-Based Learning
Monica Rodriguez-Castro
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

This session will outline the design of an online graduate course in translation project management. A course on translation project management is generally considered to be a crucial component of the translation curriculum. The speaker will discuss: 1) detailed course content that prepares students for the professional workplace, 2) implementation of a task-based and project-based methodology that emphasizes hands-on practice, and 3) a process-based approach for portfolio assessment to accelerate skills acquisition. This session will showcase multiple methods of preparing students for the complex projects they might encounter in the language industry. This session will also demonstrate the application of the Quality Matters rubric to the online course.


Education & Training
Related Sessions

N-1 The Swedish School: Extracurricular Language Schools in the U.S.

N-2 Cursing and Anachronisms: Swedish Culture Clash

 

Financial Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

FIN-1 Challenges and Rewards of Working for an International Organization: Finding Your Way Through the Maze
Mariana Sousa Moreira
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Working in-house as an external translator for the European Central Bank is a real challenge in terms of the diversity of texts involved. The job became particularly demanding after the start of the financial crisis, when new financial concepts and terminology were introduced. Translating this material requires close cooperation between translators and subject matter experts to determine the specific terminology and proper style for the target audience. Attendees will have the opportunity to gain insight into the variety of texts, new terminology, and new ways of facing these challenges to do the job well.


FIN-2 Understanding Financial Jargon
Silvana Debonis
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Many analysts who write economic and financial market reports make use of expressions and terms that are difficult to understand for those who are outside the financial field. The speaker will analyze extracts from actual reports and other publications to explain what they mean and how they should be understood by the translator. This session will be presented in English for translators of any language combination and will not involve any bilingual translation. This is the second part to the session given in San Francisco at ATA’s 57th Annual Conference. Recipient of the Marian S. Greenfield Financial Translation Presentation Award.


FIN-3 Financial Technology ("Fintech")
Mary Lou Bradley | Judith Lyons, CT
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Financial technology (fintech) is a rapidly growing disruptive force in the financial sector. New technology, like blockchain (the protocol underlying Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies), is expected to create long-term systemic changes to the global financial system. Keeping abreast of developments in fintech and its potential impact on financial products and services, payment delivery and settlement processes, financial regulation, reporting and compliance, etc., will be important for financial translators who will need to understand how fintech is affecting the financial sector. The speakers will present a broad overview of some existing and potential use cases for fintech, including an introduction to fintech terminology.


FIN-4 CANCELLED
International Trade and the Global Economy: Recent Trends and Outlook
Natalie Soroka
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




FIN-5 Fine-tuning Investor Relations
Mason Colby
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Translating investor relations (IR) material is like being a top race mechanic. You assemble contributions from various sources into a sleek, efficient machine, which rumbles out of the pit only to rattle back in later on ready for a tune-up. Many translations are final products, but IR texts are put to work by non-native speakers, used in multiple formats, and cut and pasted into press releases and slideshows. This will inevitably cause wear and tear on the original translation. The speaker will provide an overview of IR communications, their goals, and how to approach translating them.


Financial Translation
Related Sessions

G-5 German Corporate Governance Texts: A Translator’s Guide

I-8 Private Equity or Price-to-Earnings? Finance and Ambiguity in Conference Interpreting

 

Government T&I
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GOV-1 Preparing Interpreters for Asylum Interviews: A Full Cycle Approach
Jonathan Levy
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Providing interpreting services for government agencies presents a number of challenges. How do you recruit? How do you train? How do you test and monitor? The speaker will describe how his company met these challenges in the provision of services to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. An overall approach to service delivery will be outlined through the detailed descriptions of the activities and lessons learned. Attendees will come away with both an overall approach and concrete examples of the challenges interpreters face in these encounters


GOV-2 Interpreting and Translating for Senior Policymakers and Ministers
Bob Feron
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Accuracy and precision are always important in simultaneous interpreting and translation. In the world of diplomacy, however, sometimes preserving ambiguity, nuance, and a lack of specificity are equally important. How should interpreters and translators manage the delicate balance between being precise and “playing it safe?” How do we recognize and manage situations in which clarity and precision can sometimes create additional complications? Are there situations in which protecting our clients’ reputation and achieving their objective is more important than translating perfectly? This session will discuss these and other aspects of the art and science of interpreting and translating for policymakers.


GOV-3 Nothing Lost in Translation: How Coaching Can Serve the Wordsmith
Alison Carroll
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Where will you be professionally in a year? Five years? Ten years? The translator’s work life can sometimes feel inflexible and isolating, even unrelenting, with clients unappreciative or uncomprehending. When does the translator get a chance to detach and ask “is this working for me?” These are vivid issues for all translators, but what makes them especially so for the government translator, on staff or on contract? We will explore ways to reframe these challenges and identify new ways to respond to them. The session will include findings from coaching sessions with a high-level government translator.


GOV-4 New Options for Translators, Interpreters, and Project Managers in the Artificial Intelligence-Driven Future of Government Language Work
Sue Ellen Wright, CT | Zbigniew Ostrega, CT | Jennifer DeCamp | Joseph Mazza
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Developments in artificial intelligence (AI) and translation technologies are creating or increasing the demand for new types of language work throughout the U.S. government and the broader translation and interpreting community. This expert panel will discuss these new, fun, and challenging options for translators, interpreters, and project managers in the U.S. government. These jobs include translation technologists, terminologists, corpus linguists, annotation specialists, translation quality assessors, language analysts, and machine learning supervisors and evaluators. The panelists will discuss how to get started in this type of work. They will also discuss areas of growth and the impact of these changes on training and recruitment.


GOV-5 Unraveling the Mysterious Path to Translating for the National Virtual Translation Center
Michael Gallagher | Michael Snyder
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

The National Virtual Translation Center (NVTC) provides timely and accurate translation services to the U.S. intelligence community and other government agencies. NVTC provides intelligence analysts and officials with written translations that inform key decisions in counterterrorism, cyber, and other domains. NVTC employs U.S. citizens as linguists and project managers who work across the U.S., although NVTC’s program office and the largest number of its employees are based in Washington, DC. NVTC leverages human language technology to translate both written and audio material. Attendees will learn about the qualifications to become an NVTC team member.


GOV-6 Building Linguistic Bridges to Language Access
Sandra Acevedo | Omkar Kalaskar | Jennifer Love
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Meeting the communicative needs of families is at the forefront of engagement for school systems and public organizations. In this session, attendees will examine the practicalities in addressing language barriers and explore recent joint federal guidance relative to the creation and sustainability of viable language access programs. Attendees will also review and discuss the successes and challenges of district-wide interpreting and translation programs developed to bridge communication and facilitate meaningful access for culturally and linguistically diverse families.


GOV-7 Translation of the Decennial Census
Jason Kopp
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In March 2016, the U.S. Census Bureau created a centralized translation branch to manage all translation requirements for the 2020 Census: the Decennial Translation Branch (DTB). DTB supports an accurate and cost-effective census by creating awareness and facilitating participation of respondents with limited English proficiency. The speaker will explain DTB’s approach to translation and terminology management. The discussion will include how the use of multiple languages will be an important component of creating a census climate that facilitates goodwill and cooperation among census partners and the public at large, thereby increasing self-response, saving money, and increasing the quality of data collected.


GOV-8 Trust Me. I’m a Certified Interpreter!
Emma Garkavi, CT | Milena Calderari-Waldron | Monique Roske
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The marketplace for interpreting services varies wildly. Federal and state government agencies have created their own interpreter tests, but many don’t officially recognize each other’s credentials. The medical community has at least two different sets of exams to certify interpreters. To these efforts, one has to add vendor “certification” by language companies. The wide array of interpreter credentials baffles interpreters and requesters alike. This session will provide a comprehensive list of credentialing opportunities for U.S. interpreters hoping to clarify the reigning confusion. It will also include an overview of the future ASTM standard guide for testing interpreting skills.


Government T&I
Related Sessions

D-1 Undocumented Immigrants or Illegal Immigrants? How Do Political Preferences Influence Your Translations?

F-2 The Role of the Interpreter in Diplomacy: Part I

F-3 The Role of the Interpreter in Diplomacy: Part II

K-3 Connecting the Missing Links at the DOJ

SL-1 Susana Greiss Lecture: The Long and Winding Road to Becoming a Presidential Interpreter

SL-2 Wow! How Am I Going to Interpret That?

SL-3 Localizing President Trump’s Statements into Russian

TI-1 The Language Industry in the Trump Administration

V-1 Language Services in Education: How to Provide Translation and Interpreting Services to Parents in a Multilingual School District

V-5 The Secret Language of Bureaucrats

 

Interpreting
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

I-1 Interpreting in Education: Out of the Shadows and into the Spotlight
Giovanna Carriero-Contreras
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Court certification has been in place for years, and we now have two certification options available for health care interpreters. It seems that the U.S. interpreting profession is finally gaining respect. However, there is at least one critical sector that is still neglected: education. An estimated 22% of school-aged children in the U.S. speak a language other than English at home. This complicates communication between families and educators, causing students to fall behind. Currently, the demand for interpreters in education exceeds the available trained pool. This sector deserves the same attention and passion we have dedicated to our legal and health care efforts. The speakers will propose strategies for making that happen.


I-2 Self-Study: Deliberate Practice for Improving Interpreting
Laura Burian | Jacolyn Harmer
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Superior performance in any endeavor is rarely a haphazard or hurried accomplishment. Interpreting is no different. All learners must first recognize the knowledge, skills, and abilities they bring to the task before being able to chart and track their own unique path to expertise. There are no shortcuts, but motivation, reflection, and discipline sustain this self-study or “deliberate” practice. In this session, two professors from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey will introduce the kind of deliberate practice necessary to improve competence. This session is open to interpreters of all languages and skill levels.


I-3 An Octopus, a Hologram, or Hepburn: What Kind of Interpreter Are You?
Roberta Barroca
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Being an outstanding interpreter goes way beyond the actual act of interpreting. There are many qualities one must have and many errors to avoid. This session will address the most common mistakes interpreters make in an enlightening and fun way. The speaker will raise the audience’s awareness of what needs to be improved by using humorous analogies between interpreters and animals, celebrities, and characters. Desirable qualities will also be showcased in the same humorous way. Join us for a laugh and walk out of this session a better interpreter.


I-4 CANCELLED
Demarcation in Interpreting for Ongoing Home Visits
Melisa Riley
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)




I-5 The Challenges of Interpreting in a Humanitarian Setting
Maha El-Metwally
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Interpreters are crucial for the smooth delivery of any assistance to refugees. The speaker will examine the challenges interpreters may face when working in a humanitarian setting and provide tips on how to deal with them based on personal experience and research. Topics will include protecting yourself against secondary trauma, maintaining client confidentiality, and upholding a code of conduct. Attendees will also learn about the practical aspects of the job (e.g., irregular work hours, challenging work settings, and security issues). Competition between agencies supplying interpreters will also be discussed.


I-6 Cultural Competence - When Your Language Skills Are Not Enough: Part I
Cheri Wilson
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What happens when culture gets in the way of communication? Breaking down communication barriers can become a challenge if we’re not aware of our biases. Through the use of video clips, case studies, discussion, and role-play, this session will provide an overview of the intercultural aspects of communication and the regulatory framework of culturally competent language access services. In a world where machine translation is becoming more advanced, cultural competence adds value to your language skills. Come learn about your implicit biases and the tools to overcome and re-think your role as a cultural broker.


I-7 Cultural Competence - When Your Language Skills Are Not Enough: Part II
Cheri Wilson
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

See abstract for I-6: Cultural Competence - When Your Language Skills Are Not Enough: Part I


I-8 Private Equity or Price-to-Earnings? Finance and Ambiguity in Conference Interpreting
Jonathan Rechtman
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Conference interpreters don’t just shuffle words between languages; they challenge themselves to achieve a deeper conceptual understanding of the topic under discussion. This is particularly challenging in finance, which is jargon-heavy, acronym-prone, and often inaccessible to casual observers. Without sufficient contextual knowledge, financial homophones like PE (private equity) and P/E (price-to-earnings) can become perilous traps for interpreters. What’s more, the jargon keeps changing. For example, in 2008, interpreters rushed to master “collateralized debt obligations,” “credit default swaps,” and “mortgage-backed securities.” A decade later, what new terminology lies on the cutting edge of financial innovation, and how can interpreters be best prepared?


I-9 Getting Ahead of the Story: A Proactive Approach to Best Practices for Remote Interpreting for Interpreters, Buyers, and Vendors
Katharine Allen | Barry Olsen
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreting is being flipped by mobile communication and new remote interpreting platforms. Several decades of hard work have established guidelines for onsite interpreting working, payment, and hiring practices. Our profession is struggling to adapt to the rapid expansion of remote interpreting. The speaker will discuss a proactive, collaborative approach to establishing much-needed guidelines, best practices, and protocols for clients who request remote interpreting, the agencies and institutions who fill those assignments, and the interpreters who accept them. The approach invites all major stakeholders to create a mechanism for the profession to get out of reactive mode and into solution mode.


I-10 Consecutive Interpreting: Trusting Our Memory
Athena Matilsky
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

When we hear an utterance that starts getting longer and longer, a panic button often triggers in our brains. In this session, attendees will learn techniques to evaluate their interpreting output critically and to change old habits so they don’t get stuck in a negative feedback loop. We will discuss active listening and our capacity for retention without notes. We will then participate in practice drills using symbols, abbreviations, and note-structures to solidify long-utterance retention. Whether they hope to pass an exam or improve their on-the-job renditions, attendees will come away more confident, prepared, and ready to achieve their professional goals.


I-11 Working Successfully with Written Texts in the Simultaneous Mode
Leire Carbonell-Agüero | Cas Shulman-Mora
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreters are frequently provided with written documents prior to interpreting. Working in the simultaneous mode with these documents can be helpful, but it can also be considered a hindrance. The speaker will outline and demonstrate specific techniques that can help interpreters manage and prepare documents to be used during simultaneous interpreting, whether they are provided well in advance, at the last minute, or anytime in between. The exercises will examine how interpreters work successfully with these documents to ensure they do not become an impediment to quality interpreting. Text examples will be provided in English.


I-12 Interpreting Meets Transcreation in the Portuguese Version of Interpreting: Getting It Right
Cristina Silva, CT | Giovana Boselli, CT | Marsel de Souza, CT
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will discuss the creative process of creating a Brazilian Portuguese version of Interpreting: Getting It Right for U.S. and Brazilian markets. The speakers will focus on various aspects of their translation and adaptation efforts. The session is geared toward interpreters and translators alike, particularly those with an interest in transcreation. Examples of particularly challenging passages will be discussed (the excerpts shown will be back-translated into English). Based on a comparison between what needs to be conveyed to an American readership and what needs to be conveyed to a Brazilian readership, the speakers will discuss what would be appropriate for transcreation into other languages/cultures.


Interpreting
Related Sessions

AST-01 The Digital InterpreterTM: Tablets and Pens

AST-02 Long Consecutive Bootcamp: An Applied Skills Workshop for Interpreters

AST-08 Rethinking Your Simultaneous Interpreting Delivery 2.0

AST-09 Improve Your Consecutive Note-taking for Dialog Interpreting

ET-4 SIMinar: Interpreting Theory Meets Real Life

ET-5 Interpreter Training for Heritage Speakers: A Model for Developing Competence

K-4 Doing More with Less: Taking Your Note-taking Skills to the Next Level

P-5 Pitfalls of Interpreting between Portuguese and English

P-6 Self-Recording, Transcribing, Language Analysis, and Self-Enhancement: Painstaking, but Rewarding

 

Independent Contractors
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

IC-1 Top Tips From My First Two Years as a Freelance Translator
Meghan McCallum
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Congratulations on taking the plunge into freelancing! You’ve got a good foundation of translation skills to get started, but what about everything else? What should you do to ensure that your new business is successful and not just a leap of faith? The speaker will teach new freelancers a variety of tips she learned during her first two years in freelance translation. She will share simple but effective strategies freelancers can implement into their routines to ensure long-term success. This session will focus on organization, essential investments, productivity, making the most of non-billable time, and more.


IC-2 Contingency Planning and Crisis Management 101
Jill Sommer
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What would you do in the event of a crisis? Do you have a backup plan in the event of an email server outage, hard drive failure, power outage, or natural disaster? What about hospitalization? A crisis is a significant unexpected disruptive event that affects an organization’s personnel, facilities, information systems, or critical records. The event could be large or small, such as a natural disaster or human in origin. Smart and diligent contingency planning is an important aspect of crisis management because it ensures that individuals and organizations make the necessary preparations to be ready when trouble strikes.


IC-3 Get Your Tool Belt Ready for Jobs: How to Get Hired
Gabriela Bess | Anna McGinnis
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Do you have your “tool belt” ready? Before applying for jobs, learn to find competitive ways to show off your qualifications and skills. A recruiter for a major company, the speaker will teach you how to market yourself to the best advantage by highlighting certifications, background checks, and even immunization histories. You would be surprised by the qualifications that might interest your clients! This session will include a breakout discussion to analyze résumés and help you effectively demonstrate your tool belt on not only your résumé, but on social media outlets as well. Come learn how to rise to the top of the résumé pile!


IC-4 Selling Your Translation and Interpreting Services
John Di Rico
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Beginner; Presented in: English)

What should you do next after you receive an email requesting a quote? What should you be doing to effectively take this prospect from lead to loyal client? During this session, we’ll examine the customer-centric sales methodology and how to apply it to your translation or interpreting business. After leaving the session, attendees will be able to formulate questions to identify client goals and lead a sales conversation. They will also be able to draft sales follow-up email that reiterate goals, offer solutions, and detail the next steps to seal the deal.


IC-5 Going Once, Going Twice, Sold! Is Your Translation Business Sellable?
Avi Staiman
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

When we start our professional careers, the last thing on our minds is whether our business has value (i.e., Is it “sellable”?). However, when it comes time for retirement, it’s important to consider the potential value of our business to other translators, agencies, or interested parties. Unfortunately, we don’t usually know how to define and convey this value to others properly. We will look at what makes a business appealing to a potential buyer and discuss what can be done to add tangible value to our business and how we can benefit from our business well after retirement.


IC-6 Translators and Agencies: Two Captains, One Boat
Michael Elliff | Gerhard Preisser
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Whether new translators find success in their chosen careers depends on their relationship with the agencies for which they work. Agencies look for quality, dependability, flexibility, and good communication skills. Freelancers want their agency clients to be open to questions, willing to share information upfront regarding their expectations, and reliable when it comes to compensation. In this session, a veteran translator and an equally seasoned agency owner will introduce, discuss, and reenact different real-life scenarios to underscore what good communication between both sides is all about.


IC-7 You’re in Business: How to Price Your Work
Jonathan Hine, CT
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translators and interpreters are in business. Pricing and monitoring financial performance are crucial to business success. This session will cover the elements of budgeting and business planning. The methodology will help attendees develop personal criteria for accepting or rejecting freelance assignments, balancing employment offers, and choosing alternatives for business expansion. The session will also cover calculating the break-even price and tracking sales volume and revenue. This isn’t a session about number crunching, so come prepared to enjoy learning how to set your business on a solid financial footing and keep it there.


IC-8 Working with Direct Clients. For Real.
Chris Durban
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Many translators (newbies, mid-career, and mature) view direct clients as El Dorado. High rates! Dedicated authors! Job satisfaction! (Have we mentioned high rates?) But even motivated translators report finding it difficult to break into this market. Despite their best efforts, they hit a wall. Advice abounds on social media, but many of the industry’s most vocal “experts” lack a solid track record with demanding direct clients themselves. This session will examine why the shift from agency work can be so hard. The speaker will analyze prerequisites to building and maintaining a solid portfolio of passionate, dedicated direct clients.


IC-9 Beating the Digital Competition: How to Boost Your Website’s Organic Search Traffic
Matthew Kushinka
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Increasing organic search traffic should be a key part of any freelancer’s digital strategy. But with over one billion websites in the world, how can your small site ever stand out? The speaker will share tips for attracting visitors who are searching for exactly what you’re selling. Topics will include Google Analytics and Google Search Console, domain authority, backlink profiles, keyword research, content marketing, site security and speed, responsive design, and search engine optimization (both on-page and off-page). Attendees will receive a comprehensive checklist of to-do items for use on their own sites.


IC-10 Making the Most of Twitter: Marketing and Networking in 140 Characters or Less
Judy Jenner
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Do you hate Twitter, don’t understand it, or think it’s a waste of time? Are you puzzled by the term “hashtag”? Love it or hate it, Twitter is here to stay and it has a major impact on business, especially for small business owners. The speaker, who has more than 11,000 Twitter followers, will explain, in clear language, what Twitter is and what linguists can expect from using it, from increasing your public profile to interacting with others in the profession. The speaker will cover the importance of safeguarding your online reputation, address ethics, and identify business opportunities.


IC-11 How to Create Winning Translation Service Contracts
Paula Arturo | Amanda Williams
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Deciphering translation contracts and creating your own service agreements can be an arduous task. How do we detect problem clauses and determine which ones need to be negotiated? How do we create our own service agreements? In this session, a lawyer-linguist and business savvy freelancer will impart her unique perspectives on how to detect red flags in contracts, how to negotiate revisions to problem clauses, and how to use sample contracts available online to create solid translation service agreements. Attendees will be provided with a checklist of must-have contract clauses and will leave with confidence in forging equitable client-customer relationships.


IC-12 Translating Your Way to Financial Independence
Susan Adams | Allison Wollenberger
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session is for new and established translators who want to achieve financial independence. There are five steps to help translators grow beyond merely repaying student loans and scraping to make ends meet. The speaker will discuss how to assess and address financial goals, risk management, investment strategies, retirement planning, and estate planning. This session will teach translators how to take a successful independent or corporate practice to the next level. Like other businesses, if properly designed and planned, your practice can grow, expand, and ultimately be sold or left behind to partners or heirs.


IC-13 Work Smarter, Not Harder
Silvia D'Amico
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

You worked hard to establish a successful business and then life happened. Now you need to make changes to your work schedule and wonder if your income and relationships with clients will be affected negatively. Whether you need to take care of small children or elderly parents or want to reconsider your work/life balance, the speaker will discuss strategies to work fewer hours while maintaining the same income level. The speaker will identify how to maximize your working hours, increase the dollar per hour ratio, eliminate time-wasting activities, and, ultimately, become more efficient.


Independent Contractors
Related Sessions

AST-05 Build a WordPress Website for Your Translation Business

AST-13 Getting to "Yes" and Sealing the Deal: How to Negotiate and Draft Translation Contracts

F-6 Grow Your Translation Business with Genealogical Translation

GOV-4 New Options for Translators, Interpreters, and Project Managers in the Artificial Intelligence-Driven Future of Government Language Work

GOV-5 Unraveling the Mysterious Path to Translating for the National Virtual Translation Center

LSC-4 The Agency-Freelancer Dating Game Redux: From Courtship to Commitment

LSC-5 How to Work with Translators: Best Practices for Producing the Best Technical Translations

LSC-6 Clarifying for the Client: How to Explain Why the Translation Is Different from the Original

LSC-7 International Organizations: How They Get Translation Work Done and How to Get Involved

ST-8 How to Specialize and Expand Your Business into New Technical Markets

V-1 Language Services in Education: How to Provide Translation and Interpreting Services to Parents in a Multilingual School District

 

Literary Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

L-1 The Russian Revolution in Spanish Translation: The Forgotten Revolution of the Ukrainian Anarchist Benjamin Abramson in Argentina
Adel Fauzetdinova
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will draw from her research in literature, history, politics, and translation studies to examine the translations of an anarchist from the Russian Revolution. This session will focus on the work of a historic but mostly unknown translator, Benjamin Abramson, a Ukrainian-Jewish anarchist who fled to Argentina in 1910. Abramson became a prolific translator of Russian literature and the Russian Revolution. The speaker will discuss the connections between Abramson’s translations of revolutionary writings, the context into which they were inserted, and the caricatured and parodied revolution portrayed in Roberto Arlt’s work.


L-2 How to Mix Business with Poetry
Shelley Fairweather-Vega, CT | Katherine Young
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English with Russian examples)

Sometimes an administrative nightmare has a happy ending. Last year, in a rushed attempt to produce English versions of 100 Russian poems, an editor assigned two translators to translate the same two pieces. Which versions would be published? Who would get paid? What do real professionals do in a situation like this? The speakers will discuss their translations and share their insights into this thorny aspect of the business of literary translation. Source texts are in Russian, by Mikhail Lermontov and Anna Akhmatova, but knowledge of Russian will not be necessary to join the discussion.


L-3 Forms of Faithfulness in Literary Translation
Katrina Dodson
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What does it mean for a translation to be “faithful” to the original? The concept of fidelity is both central to literary translation and a potential red herring that can lead to overly literal renderings. This session will explore various, often competing, forms of faithfulness in translation, from following syntax and exact punctuation to finding equivalencies of register, tone, and perceived “strangeness” versus “naturalness” in the original text. The speaker will draw on her own experience translating Clarice Lispector’s stories with the explicit goal of achieving a greater level of fidelity to the iconic Brazilian writer’s famously idiosyncratic voice.


L-4 What Makes Literary Translation Successful?
Jonathan McQuay
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Besides getting on the good side of the Big Five in publishing, what options are there to promote a quality literary translation and get paid for it? The American market is opening up to translated literature in new ways. This means there are exciting opportunities available to the intrepid translator. Come take a look at a study of what the American market is hungry for and discover ways to reach it. This session will also explore the pros and cons of different publication paths and business relationships with publishers.


L-5 Researching Literary Translations
Katrina Dodson
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The role of research in literary translation is a rarely discussed area that varies greatly between projects. This session will consider the potential forms of research that literary translations can entail, from site-specific travel and archival research to background reading, surfing online, and locating reference tools. How can research strengthen your translation and when does it become an unnecessary distraction? How familiar should you be with an author’s literary historical context across languages? The speaker will discuss projects in which she never left her home library, versus traveling to São Paulo archives and the Amazon rain forest for her current translation.


Literary Translation
Related Sessions

J-3 Translating Sex and Gender: Part I, Henry James

J-4 Translating Sex and Gender: Part II, The Tale of Genji

P-3 Literary Dialect: The Challenge of Translating New York Hustlers and Brazilian Miners

P-4 The Challenges of Translating a Holocaust Survivor’s Memoir

 

Legal T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LAW-1 The Role of Translation in the Immigration Process
Olga Shostachuk
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

All documents filed with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) must be presented in English. Thus, the role translation plays is pivotal. Translating these documents requires an understanding of the process and specific subject matter expertise. In this session, attendees will learn how to properly prepare and authenticate official documents that are used in the immigration process. Attendees will also learn about the legal discourse pertaining to official document translation and improve their terminology management and research skills.


LAW-2 Common Law and Civil Law: Approaches and Terminologies
Geoffrey Koby, CT | Ulrich Lohmann
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session will focus on the two major systems of law with which many legal translators must deal: 1) common law: the legal system developed in England that is now used in the U.S. and most English-speaking countries; and 2) civil law as practiced in the non-Anglo-Saxon world, which is a descendent of Roman law. We’ll discuss the basic conceptual differences between the two systems, specifically how they approach legislation and precedent, and legal scholarship versus case law. We’ll also discuss terminological and conceptual differences and similarities and examine how the systems influence each other.


LAW-3 Special Aspects of Translating Discovery Documents
Timothy Friese, CT
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

What are discovery documents? In the U.S. legal system, these are the extensive disclosures made from one party to the other at the beginning of a lawsuit, often in email or other correspondence. Translating discovery documents has special challenges due to the large number that are usually involved, tight deadlines, the conversational tone of email, or the lack of adequate context. By learning more about discovery documents you’ll be better prepared to field requests and decide what role you want them to play in your business.


LAW-4 Deciphering Spanish-language Bylaws: A Structural Approach
Robert Sette, CT
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Company bylaws and related documents are part and parcel of the work of commercial translators, ranging from repetitive and mundane to challenging. This session will analyze the structure of company bylaws and other organizational and corporate documents using primarily Spanish (but also French and Portuguese) source documents as a starting point. A terminology list will be provided for reference and discussion. The focus will be on conveying the source content accurately and faithfully for an English-speaking reader or customer.


LAW-5 What It Takes to Become a Certified Court Interpreter
Victoria Dopazo
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

This session is designed for people who want to become court interpreters. It will give attendees an overview of what the job entails, including the types of court proceedings and non-court situations (e.g., jail visits, mediation, witness preparation, etc.) in which a court interpreter should be prepared to interpret. The speaker will also discuss the benefits of becoming certified and teach attendees how to prepare to take the court certification exam.


LAW-6 CANCELLED
Think Like a Lawyer, Act Like a Court Interpreter
Virginia Valencia
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




LAW-7 NEW SESSION
On/Off the Record: Anatomy of a Deposition and How to Master This Niche
Elena Langdon, CT
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English with Portuguese examples)

Intended for experienced interpreters who want to branch out to a new area, this presentation will outline the procedures, expectations, and nuances of interpreting during a deposition or similar hearing. We will cover videoconferencing, how to make fast friends with the court reporter, dealing with "immigrant speak," and logistics. Preparation (and survival) strategies, vocabulary, and dos and don'ts will also be addressed. Some examples will be given in Portuguese, but the presentation is open to all. Depositions can be tricky; after this session you will feel more prepared and confident to tackle a new interpreting environment.


Legal T&I
Related Sessions

A-3 Arabic Criminal Terminology and Court Interpreting

J-1 Views of a Patent Attorney: The Intellectual Property Trend and Its Impact on Patent Translation

N-3 Translating Contracts from Swedish into English: Problems and Pitfalls

N-4 Comparison of Scandinavian and U.S. Legal Systems

S-1 Class Action Lawsuits: Terminology and Translation Pitfalls

S-9 The Structure of the Civil Law System and Its Impact on Translation: Part I

S-10 The Structure of the Civil Law System and Its Impact on Translation: Part II

SL-6 Criminal Law Terminology in Polish and English

 

Language Services Companies
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LSC-1 Finders Keepers: A Language Services Provider’s Approach to Sustainable Vendor Management
Michael Bearden
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will reveal the round-the-clock efforts of a mid-sized language services provider (LSP) as it carefully cultivates and manages a growing database of international contract linguists and global support staff. The speaker will peel back the curtain and detail the company’s efforts and share tools and technologies aimed at managing the recruitment, selection, qualification, performance rating, and development of external resources as per the company’s overall operations strategy and priorities. Attendees will enjoy an objective, transparent glimpse into the vendor management process of an LSP and receive tips to help best leverage their work and maximize mutual potential for success.


LSC-2 Using Better Data to Run a Better Translation Company
Peter Reynolds
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

A translation company can be a particularly hard business to run. Most companies are small and are often managed by a person who also does sales, quality management, vendor management, or even all three. The first thing you need to run a great translation company is brilliant people. To make the best decisions and for the company to evolve, you need good data. Many translation companies don’t realize they have already obtained some important information through the various tools they use. The speaker will describe a strategy for harnessing data you already collect to better run your business.


LSC-3 Languages and Open Data: How Language Services Providers Can Contribute to Smart Cities
Luisa M. Cano | Eliana Trinaistic
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Over the past decade, a large number of public-sector organizations have been embracing open data as a way to ensure transparency. Open data can also generate economic and social value for all industries, including the language industry. Active participation in open data initiatives benefits language services providers by creating opportunities for collaboration (skills) and contribution (voice) to “smart cities” agendas. This session will highlight the unique responsibilities of language services providers in ensuring that critical language data is represented adequately within the larger set of urban indicators. The speakers will also discuss challenges with open data sharing and the unlikely collaborators and partnerships.


LSC-4 The Agency-Freelancer Dating Game Redux: From Courtship to Commitment
Robert Sette, CT | Steve Lank
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Building on their session at ATA57 in San Francisco, the speakers have conducted another survey of agencies and freelance translators to delve more deeply into the secret to establishing successful, mutually beneficial business relationships. Is one late payment a deal-breaker for freelancers? What about a delivery deadline that slips a bit? What’s the sweet spot where true partnership is achieved? Some of the results will align with expectations, but others may be surprising. The focus will be on business practices and professionalism as a way of building strong relationships that stand the test of time.


LSC-5 How to Work with Translators: Best Practices for Producing the Best Technical Translations
Linda Gaus
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Translation is a process, not just the final product. Smooth cooperation is the key to producing a translation that will please everyone. The speaker will discuss the key elements of optimal cooperation and propose some best practices for producing high-quality technical translations. By viewing this process from the translator’s perspective, the speaker hopes that project managers and others involved in the production of technical documentation will better understand exactly what translators need to do their job as well as they possibly can.


LSC-6 CANCELLED
Clarifying for the Client: How to Explain Why the Translation Is Different from the Original
Louis Mitler
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




LSC-7 International Organizations: How They Get Translation Work Done and How to Get Involved
James Phillips
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Vast amounts of translation work are put to tender by the United Nations and by affiliated organizations such as the World Intellectual Property Organization every year. This is because these organizations are bound by strict procurement rules that stipulate how they can and cannot get translation work done. The speaker will outline how these procurement rules work and what they mean for people who would like to work with such organizations. The speaker will also discuss how to apply to such tenders and describe the most common mistakes made by applicants. This session will be of particular interest to translation agencies, but will also deal with how freelancers can get their foot on the ladder.


LSC-8 Stop the Price Madness! Achieving Market Transparency in the Purchasing Process
Lena Sarbacher
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

One of the biggest challenges for both industry clients and language services providers (LSPs) is to find professional translation partners for a wide variety of language combinations and topics on the market. But what makes an LSP or a freelance translator the “perfect fit” for a project? Factors such as language pair combination, experience, reliability, and price make the difference. We’ll discuss the challenges of selling and buying translations and how to find the right translation partner. We’ll also discuss the variety and diversity of market demands, how we can address them properly, and how technology can help us connect buyer and seller to get the “best match.”


LSC-9 The Project Life Cycle for Project Managers
Alaina Brantner
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The work of project managers is easy to take for granted, that is, until a project is not managed well. The setup of each project stage impacts the success of all subsequent stages, and projects that are not well planned from the start quickly snowball into a painful experience for all project stakeholders. This session will address project management strategies for each stage of the project life cycle, including quoting, launch, translation, quality control, formatting, delivery, and post-production. Ways to adapt strategies and the allocation of resources to specific project objectives will also be explored.


LSC-10 Data Security for Project Managers
Alaina Brantner | Joseph Wojowski
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Project managers are the traffic hub for all files submitted to and issued by language services providers. In an increasingly cloud-based work environment, that valuable file information is vulnerable to being leaked and used against the company to which it was sent, as well as against its providers and clients. Project managers must arm themselves with the knowledge necessary to perform their day-to-day tasks while protecting client data. The speaker will provide project managers with the knowledge to protect client intellectual property. Topics will include file transfer systems, procedures for qualifying providers, non-disclosure agreements, quality assurance processes, and data breaches.


LSC-11 NEW SESSION
A Case Study on Launching and Managing a Custom Machine Translation Program for Translators in Three Countries, Four Languages, and Multiple Domains 
Rihards Kalnins | Didzis Klavins
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

To help boost translator productivity and win new business from buyers and multi-language vendors, a language services provider (LSP) in Europe launched a large-scale custom machine translation (MT) program for four languages and multiple domains. The program was aimed at supporting the LSP’s translators working at offices in three countries. In this session, presented by managers from the LSP’s MT and localization departments, you'll learn the basic steps for launching a custom MT program, how to manage and maintain a large set of domain-specific MT engines, and the many practical benefits (in both time and money) of introducing MT engines into your translation and localization workflow.


Language Services Companies
Related Sessions

GOV-4 New Options for Translators, Interpreters, and Project Managers in the Artificial Intelligence-Driven Future of Government Language Work

IC-5 Going Once, Going Twice, Sold! Is Your Translation Business Sellable?

IC-6 Translators and Agencies: Two Captains, One Boat

IC-13 Work Smarter, Not Harder

 

Language Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LT-1 Becoming a Super-Fast Freelance Translator and Coping with Technology in a Constantly Evolving World!
Sameh Ragab
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The translation industry is becoming increasingly tech-driven, which means that freelance translators should develop their own mechanisms and protocols to keep up. This session will focus on how to boost productivity, automate tedious translation tasks, achieve more in less time, and become the preferred super-fast translator you always wanted to be.


LT-2 Tools to Boost: A Zero-Budget Plan
Flora Zhang
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Not all companies provide Trados for their in-house translators. The speaker will introduce attendees to a few free computer-assisted translation and machine translation tools, as well as optical character recognition software that fit well in the zero-budget plan. The speaker will explain the translation process with a tool demonstration and share tips for selling the idea to the boss and colleagues. Attendees may find more solutions to boost their translation efficiency, workflow, and project management skills.


LT-3 What File Types? Another Treasure Trove of Settings in Trados Studio
Tuomas Kostiainen, CT
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Many Trados Studio users are unaware of the various file type options that Studio offers. In most simple translation situations, this may not be needed because Studio functions fine with the default settings. However, knowing what these settings do and what you can do with them can be very useful. This session will provide a general overview of Studio file type options. Attendees will learn about some specific examples where knowing these settings can be a real productivity booster, such as when translating partially translated Excel files or Excel files with HTML tags, or when you want to translate Wordfast files in Trados Studio.


LT-4 Search (and Replace) on Steroids: How Regular Expressions Can Help Make Your CAT Tool Even More Useful
Riccardo Schiaffino, CT
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Regular expressions have a reputation for being difficult, but once you learn to use them, they can really help you do things with your computer-aided translation tools and quality-assurance tools that would be impossible otherwise. This session will provide examples of useful regular expression techniques you can use with such software programs as SDL Trados Studio, memoQ, and Xbench. The speaker will suggest tools that make creating useful regular expressions easier.


LT-5 The Final Touch: Desktop Publishing and InDesign Basics
Ray Valido
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In recent years, Adobe InDesign has become arguably the industry standard software for text layout and desktop publishing. Working with different languages in InDesign, however, can pose many challenges. This session will cover some basic techniques for working with your translation in Adobe InDesign while also addressing basic desktop publishing with different character sets and text directions. Whether you’re a project manager or a translator, this session will give you helpful tips for working in both Adobe and Microsoft. You’ll also have the chance to share tips you’ve learned with others. Both Mac and PC enthusiasts are welcome.


Language Technology
Related Sessions

AST-03 AI, NMT, and Me: Thriving in the Age of Artificial Intelligence and Neural Machine Translation

AST-12 Trados Studio Workshop

ET-6 The Nuts and Bolts of Remote Interpreting and Training: The Tech You Need and Why You Need It

LSC-11 A Case Study on Launching and Managing a Custom Machine Translation Program for Translators in Three Countries, Four Languages, and Multiple Domains 

 

Medical T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

MED-1 The Mind-Body Connection: Translating Health and Wellness Trends for the Consumer Market
Erin Lyons, CT
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Consumer health products, green living, and lifestyle brands form an interesting niche for translators with a health background, but these are uncharted waters when it comes to terminology and regulatory issues. How do you keep up with a growing cornucopia of jargon and slang? How do you unpack terms, such as “conscious uncoupling” or “alkaline cleanses”? Can you merge science and marketing without green washing? What are the best strategies for translating this food for thought?


MED-2 You are Only as Good as Your Gut
Noemy Cochran
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

One of the exciting new topics of medicine in the past few years is the gut microbioma interaction with human health. The gut has been called the second brain. It’s responsible not only for digestion, absorption, and elimination, but also affects your mood, thoughts, immune system, and overall health. The speaker will provide an overview of the gut microbioma and normal gut health. The speaker will also review gut and illness interactions, particularly those related to autism, depression, muscular dystrophy, and inflammatory diseases. Other topics will include therapies such as fecal transplant and gut flora rehabilitation, as well as the direction of future therapies.


MED-3 Medical Terminology: Problem Solving Through Parallel Texts
Helen Eby, CT
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

How can we identify the right expression, but also the right way to talk about the subject? And how can we understand enough about new material to propose reasonable solutions? The solutions found in medical dictionaries are often insufficient. In this session, attendees will explore the use of parallel texts and work in small groups to solve some translation problems. The materials provided come from medical sources, but the same principles can be applied to any area of translation. These practices have proven useful to both interpreters and translators.


MED-4 Translating Diagnostic Imaging: Is It Hyperechoic or Hyperintense?
Erin Lyons, CT | Lori Newman
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Ever wonder how an MRI works, or how to translate an MRI report for a radiologist? In this session, we’ll cover the basic functions and uses of major imaging modalities, such as radiographs, MRI, CT, and ultrasound. We’ll then delve into the highly specialized terminology of diagnostic imaging reports and explain the terms used in each modality. We’ll share examples from French and English to demonstrate the pitfalls of medical jargon, acronyms, and cognates. Come join us for this hyperintense session!


MED-5 Where Is the Line and How Do I Draw It? A Deep Dive into Impartiality and Role Boundaries for Health Care Interpreters
Elena Langdon, CT
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session will explore two commonly misunderstood standards of practice for health care interpreters, impartiality and role boundaries, and strategies to uphold them. Both standards are essential to guarantee a patient’s right to equal access, and yet they can be tricky to carry out when a situation challenges personal values or pulls at heartstrings. The speaker will examine how an interpreter’s visibility, implicit bias, and self-awareness can help or impair communication. Attendees will leave with concrete suggestions on how to better visualize the lines they cannot cross and manage an encounter in which they are asked to step out of their role.


MED-6 The Legal Case for Language Access and Culturally Competent Health Care: Part I
Bruce Adelson
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Equity of care, cultural competence, diversity, and their connection to federal law and informed consent liability can be among the most challenging of many federal language access legal mandates. Long thought of as just “doing the right thing,” culturally competent health care, including the use of qualified interpreters and translators, is now understood as a legal imperative, with significant implications for physicians, health care providers, and language access professionals. The speaker will discuss these connections, highlighting actual cases and academic studies.


MED-7 The Legal Case for Language Access and Culturally Competent Health Care: Part II
Bruce Adelson
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

See abstract for MED-6: The Legal Case for Language Access and Culturally Competent Health Care: Part I


Medical T&I
Related Sessions

I-4 Demarcation in Interpreting for Ongoing Home Visits

J-2 Japanese>English Translation of Clinical Trial Documents

S-2 The English>Spanish Translation of Clinical Trial Protocols: Part I

S-3 The English>Spanish Translation of Clinical Trial Protocols: Part II

ST-6 Ribonucleic Acid Interference: From Lab to Bedside

 

Science & Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ST-1 CANCELLED
Translation as a Historical Process in Science: What Do We Know?
Scott Montgomery
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




ST-2 CANCELLED
English as the Global Language of Science: Understanding Its Present and Future
Scott Montgomery
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




ST-3 Translating Terminology Related to Explosives and Bombing
Christina Schoeb, CT
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Due to the highly technical nature of terminology related to bombs and explosives, this area poses challenges even when translating into one’s native language. This session will provide an overview of the terminology involved. Designed for anyone working with English as a source or target language, this session may be appropriate for other language pairs. The terminology will prepare translators and interpreters to deal with various situations, including bombing incidents and court cases related to bombing. This session will also cover scientific language related to explosives chemistry, types of explosives, types of bombs, and bombing components.


ST-4 Keeping Up with a Moving Target: Environmental Terminology
Martina Burkert, CT
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

From climate change to heavy metals, the environmental field offers translators many areas of specialization. Decades of environmental awareness have fundamentally changed technologies and sparked the formation of governmental agencies and environmental organizations worldwide. While translators need to adhere to standardized language when translating some globally harmonized regulations, much of the environmental terminology is under constant development and definitions are often not consistent among stakeholders. This session will outline different categories of environmental concerns, address ambiguities in relation to important environmental terms, and provide resources that will help translators improve their proficiency in specific environmental fields.


ST-5 A Drop in the Ocean? Strategies and Technologies to Conserve Water for Current and Future Generations
Abigail Dahlberg
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Water is essential for life. As climate change and demographic factors (e.g., population growth and migration) place an even greater strain on the availability of this resource, there’s a growing awareness that water is a precious commodity. This session will explore the integrated strategies that have been developed to conserve water and resolve conflicts over its use in the developing world. It will also touch on water-saving technologies, ranging from low-flush toilets and drip irrigation to wastewater recycling systems.


ST-6 Ribonucleic Acid Interference: From Lab to Bedside
Tapani Ronni, CT
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Discovered around 20 years ago, ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) is a naturally occurring phenomenon whereby a specific gene expression is suppressed. Basic research has now enabled scientists to develop efficient RNAi tools to alter gene expression in cells and laboratory animals. Because RNAi suppresses gene expression at the messenger RNA level, it can be used therapeutically to target disease-causing genes. Because RNAi can prevent target protein production, it may be a superior therapeutic option in some cases, compared to antibodies and small molecule drugs, which inactivate proteins by directly binding to them. The speaker will discuss developments in this area.


ST-7 An Introduction to Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Neural Networks
Carola Berger, CT
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

From spam filters to stock trading bots, the applications of artificial intelligence are already omnipresent. This poses important questions such as: Will my autonomous vacuum cleaner go on a rampage and eat the hamster? Do neural networks think like brains? What are the chances of a robot uprising? This session will address these questions and provide an introduction to artificial intelligence, which is impacting all our lives, perhaps more than most people are aware. However, this session will not discuss machine translation and related topics. No knowledge of computer science or advanced mathematics is required to attend.


ST-8 NEW SESSION
How to Specialize and Expand Your Business into New Technical Markets
Karen Tkaczyk, CT | Nicholas Hartmann, CT | Lebzy González
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Technical translators need long-term strategies for expanding or transitioning their business to new fields as translation markets emerge and wane. Many of us also have been, or will eventually be, affected by factors such as the increased use of new machine translation approaches, changing patent translation requirements, or downturns in the economy of our source and/or target countries. The panel will discuss the career trajectories of three experienced technical translators, including how they developed new areas of specialization throughout the years and what strategies they still see as relevant in today’s business environment.


ST-9 NEW SESSION
When a Christmas Tree is Not Really a Christmas Tree
Patricia McGrory
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Every industry takes it upon itself to create their own lingo to describe their equipment, operations, and sometimes employees. The petroleum industry is no exception. Its vernacular consists of terms that are born in the field and find their way into the corporate office. The presenter will explore the colourful jargon used in the petroleum industry and explain its meaning and how to translate them. This seminar targets those who already have translation experience and are considering translating for the petroleum sector. Resources will be provided. Time for Q&A will be allocated.


Science & Technology
Related Sessions

F-4 Never a Dull Day? The Nitty Gritty of French>English Technical Translation

FIN-4 International Trade and the Global Economy: Recent Trends and Outlook

J-2 Japanese>English Translation of Clinical Trial Documents

J-5 Get "Gung Ho!": Japanese Interpreting and Translating in the North America Automotive Sector

LSC-5 How to Work with Translators: Best Practices for Producing the Best Technical Translations

MED-1 The Mind-Body Connection: Translating Health and Wellness Trends for the Consumer Market

S-2 The English>Spanish Translation of Clinical Trial Protocols: Part I

S-3 The English>Spanish Translation of Clinical Trial Protocols: Part II

S-11 Interpreting and Translating for Farmers and Migrant Workers

SL-5 Russian Submarines: How They’re Built

 

Translation
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T-1 Confidentiality in Translation: Legal and Ethical Requirements and Pitfalls
Emanuel Weisgras
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translators in specialty fields such as law, medicine, and finance are often exposed to their clients’ most important secrets and confidential information. This session will review translators’ legal and ethical obligations to maintain the confidentiality of source and translated material based on requirements and guidelines in the U.S., the EU, and the Middle East. It will also cover common confidentiality pitfalls, including machine translation, free email accounts, and peer support platforms. Audience participation is encouraged.


T-2 Translating between the Lines: Enhancing Translation Quality
Sabine Seiler
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Do you check your translations, comparing them to the source text to verify that you rendered the meaning accurately and completely? Of course you do, but is that quality check sufficient to make sure that you’ve translated the meaning between the lines (i.e., what’s said below the source text’s surface)? The reverberations and interrelation between words and grammatical structures often remain just outside our awareness, subliminal yet powerful. Using specific examples, attendees will learn techniques for becoming aware of and including this level of meaning in their translations. Doing so is a valuable step to ensure quality control.


T-3 Translating Correspondence, or "Don’t You Talk to Me Like That!"
Eve Hecht, CT
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Most documents translated by the legal or commercial translator have cover letters or email. These introduce the parties to one another and, not incidentally, introduce us as translators. If the letter sounds unnatural, stilted, or overly familiar, the wrong tone may be set. Similarly, letters between parties to negotiations or lawsuits are often more important to a settlement than anything that happens in court. While correspondence is often treated as an afterthought, rendering the salutations, closings, and titles correctly, as well as the tone and register of the body of the letter, requires skill and an understanding of business and social norms.


T-4 Getting Down to Business: Quality Reviewing Practices for Streaming Media
Ana Gabriela Gonzalez Meade
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

Viewer expectations should be the most important aspect when reviewing media to be streamed. However, audiovisual content conventions vary greatly due to critical and realistic factors, such as client guidelines, tight deadlines, a depressed market, the skillfulness of the translators and reviewers, and technical constraints. This session will focus on the current reviewing practices for the most prominent companies in the field. What’s involved and what are the rules and criteria governing quality standards? How do new tools and technology improve overall quality for tackling mistakes? How and to what extent are we required to resolve them?


T-5 Search Engine Optimization: Website and Social Media Localization
Laura Ramírez
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

With the current number of websites (more than 250 million in 2016), it’s necessary for companies and institutions to employ techniques to position themselves at the top of search results to increase traffic. When these positioning techniques (e.g., AdWord Campaigns, Facebook, and Twitter accounts) are localized, it’s necessary to adopt a transcreative approach that matches the requirements of the target audience and the search engines. The speaker will discuss the different aspects of website and social media localization. Examples of websites translated from English into Spanish will be used.


T-6 WYSIWYG Speak: Improving Your Understanding of Markup Languages
Romina Marazzato Sparano, CT
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Markup is the earmarking of digital text for content generation, management, and distribution. It’s done between the lines, so what you see is not what you get. In this process, textual wholeness seems lost by the constant parsing, tagging, and reusing of text fragments. But translators can play a vital role in the future of text by becoming involved in the markup process. This session will provide a working understating of markup languages (MLs) using a linguistic approach to the morphology, syntax, and semantics of two popular MLs, HTML (Hypertext) and XML (eXtensible), to encourage meaningful translator interventions.


T-7 Localizing Middle-Eastern Languages: Is this Right (or is it Left)?
Jonathan Golan
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will cover specific issues associated with the creation, translation, and localization of right-to-left (RTL) languages (e.g., Arabic, Hebrew, and Farsi). Dealing with RTL/bidirectional text can be both baffling and frustrating, as these languages make use not only of totally different scripts, but also require a total adaptation of both the user interface and the overall design of all documentation. The speaker will discuss user interface and document design, along with bidirectional support in various popular translation environment tools. He will illustrate specific problems and tips in bidirectional software localization and address some common technical and cultural issues in dealing with bidirectional content.


T-8 Alphabet Soup: Quality Assurance for Editing PDFs from DTP
Giovana Boselli, CT
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Once upon a time, there was a file to be translated with desktop publishing (DTP) content. The final deliverable was a PDF. Did the final deliverable display all the accents and diacriticals? Were the font and formatting like the original? How about spacing? Attend this session to find out what happened to this file and, most importantly, what needs to happen to ensure total quality assurance in what’s known in our industry as a post-DTP check. This hands-on session will reveal all the nuts and bolts in a post-DTP check so that translations become clear, legible, and suitable. Although practice exercises will be available in Portuguese and Spanish, speakers of other languages will also benefit from the discussion.


T-9 Lessons from the Plain Language Movement
Romina Marazzato Sparano, CT
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Plain language initiatives respond to a variety of issues involving reading comprehension and text difficulty. They include government guidelines to enhance citizen access to public information and private sector efforts to improve minorities access to written materials. Overall, plain language campaigns call for clarity, conciseness, and logical organization of the text. They address difficulty stemming from the complexity of the subject matter, intentional obscurity, poor grammar, weak argumentation, and reading disabilities. This session will provide participants with an overview of different plain language initiatives and their rationale, as well as language strategies they can implement in their everyday work.


T-10 Outside the Box: Everyday Continuing Professional Development for Translators
Jeanette Brickner
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Perfecting and refining our skills as translators does not have to be a chore. In fact, the very nature of our work means that we’re surrounded by opportunities to do so every day! This session will explore some eye-opening approaches toward sharpening our translation skills through activities that many, if not most, of us already do in our daily lives. We will also discuss ideas and brainstorm as a group. Attendees will leave this session with new perspectives and strategies on how they can grow their translation skills directly through everyday activities that they already do and enjoy.


T-11 To "thē" or Not to "thē": An Article on Articles
Paul Gallagher, CT
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The English system of articles (the, a, etc.) bedevils nonnative speakers, who often see it as designed purely out of sadism with no useful purpose. However, native speakers know that this system conveys useful information and helps them understand English texts. This session will explore the rules for English articles, focusing on the information they convey about content, focus, and topic. The speaker will compare the English system of articles with those of several other languages that either lack articles or use them differently. Audience participation is strongly encouraged.


Translation
Related Sessions

AST-06 Putting the Zing Back into Marketing Materials

AST-10 Beyond Translation: Lingua-Aware Services in the Age of New Media

AST-14 Revision Refresh Workshop

 

T&I Industry
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TI-1 The Language Industry in the Trump Administration
Bill Rivers
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The U.S. language industry faces significant challenges when it comes to federal contracting and labor regulations. The increased use of reverse auctions, lowest price-technically acceptable bids, and the use of the Service Contracting Act to depress rates were all a feature of the previous administration’s acquisition and regulation of the language industry. A representative of the Joint National Committee for Languages will discuss the climate in the Trump administration and the committee’s work with national partners to improve the conditions for the industry.


TI-2 Honoring Diversity: Working in Minority Languages
Steve Lank
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Demand for language services for the U.S. market is growing rapidly, but we’re not fully equipped to handle it. We know the export market. For example, we don’t have a problem when asked to translate a manual for use in France. But what about an elementary school handbook that needs to be translated into Burmese, Nepali, and Amharic? According to the U.S. Census Bureau, over 350 languages are spoken in U.S. homes. How do we identify qualified resources in these languages when the usual credentials are not available? How can we ensure that we deliver quality work and serve these communities properly? This interactive session will present some strategies.


TI-3 CANCELLED
Collaborative Innovation of Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, and Language
Youyi Huang | Hua Wu | Eric Yu
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




TI-4 NEW SESSION
Endangered Languages: Challenges and Sustainability of Rare Language Interpreting 
David Melo
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The challenge of finding rare language interpreters has tested language services providers for decades. But as many of these languages face extinction, what does this mean for the future of the industry? How does this affect rare language-speaking communities? Linguists estimate by 2100, 90% of languages will disappear entirely, many rare or indigenous. Open dialogue will allow attendees to discuss the sustainability of these languages in the industry, in addition to innovative sourcing and training strategies used in recent years.


 

Terminology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TRM-1 Extreme Terminology Management: Developing a Power Termbase
Cristina Silva, CT
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will demonstrate how to create a centralized and standardized term base with terminology that’s already available for free online from “official” government and private sources. Although language examples will come primarily from Brazilian Portuguese, this session will also appeal to translators and interpreters in every language combination who are interested in improving their knowledge about terminology management tools and streamlining their terminology management processes. Bring your terminology questions and challenges and come prepared to explore how linguists can significantly expand their term bases and translation memories.


TRM-2 The Terminology Initiative: A Systemic Approach to Process Improvement
Serena Williams
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Evidence suggests that increasing knowledge of the source language and cultural domain/specialization, as well as developing strategies to increase awareness of client terminology, are key for reducing issues related to terminology. The first part of this session will focus on the case study terminology initiative carried out by the speaker’s organization. During the second half, the speaker will present a series of fillable graphic organizers, checklists, and surveys that agencies and freelancers can use to adapt the initiative to their own context.


TRM-3 CANCELLED
Thou Shalt Not Guess: Methods and Tools for Effective Terminology Work
Bianca Blüchel | Heike Holthaus
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)




Terminology
Related Sessions

AST-04 Translation Magician Tips and Tricks Workshop

AST-11 Tips and Tricks to Boost Your Terminology Work

 

Varia
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

V-1 Language Services in Education: How to Provide Translation and Interpreting Services to Parents in a Multilingual School District
Bassam Amkeie | Tamara Martinez | Sadia Rudd
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Public schools have legal requirements for providing language services to parents who speak languages other than English. This session will examine how one of the largest school districts in the U.S. (Prince William County Public Schools in Virginia) started their own language services team to meet the needs of their diverse families. The speakers will discuss their experiences and share some of the most quality and cost-effective ways to offer free translation and interpreting services to parents who speak about 150 different languages.


V-2 Get Up, Stand Up ... for Your Health!
Eva Stabenow, CT
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

You’ve heard that sitting is the new smoking, but what’s a desk-bound translator to do? The good news is taking care of your physical and mental health and well-being doesn’t need to be complicated or expensive, nor do you have to become a super athlete. In this (inter)active session, we’ll look at everything from ergonomics to standing desks and healthy movement to help you sort out easy tweaks that work for you. This session is designed to get you moving and we’ll start right away!


V-3 Maintaining Your Professional Language Skills
Eve Lindemuth Bodeux
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Our language expertise is what makes us successful as translators and interpreters. Project work and promoting our businesses are important, but we must not neglect the linguistic expertise that we sell. As language professionals, our skills must be top notch. Attend this session for tips, ideas, and strategies on maintaining your working languages. Learn about innovative 21st-century approaches to language maintenance and find out how to use traditional approaches and game play to your benefit. Come away with new ideas, links, and references for linguistic success. All languages addressed.


V-4 I Love Your Accent
Claire Singleton
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will present a light-hearted look at life as a Brit living in the U.S., focusing specifically on linguistic differences between British English and American English. The session will be based on the speaker’s personal experiences following 16 years of life in the U.S. It will include audio and visual examples of some of the differences between the two forms of English.


V-5 The Secret Language of Bureaucrats
Katherine Yemelyanov
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Bureaucratic language permeates the work of government and large private organizations. Combining legalese and technical jargon, it deliberately flouts many ideas of good communication and often defies understanding. But a good piece of bureaucratic (a good explanation in English of an email or memo written in Bureaucratese) has the power to get things moving within an organization. Come to this session to learn more about the art of bureaucratic communication and try your hand at decoding authentic bureaucratic gibberish or getting your point across to a real bureaucrat!


V-6 Change of Venue: Language Professionals Working and Living Abroad
Chris Blakeslee | Eve Lindemuth Bodeux | Tess Whitty | Karen Williams
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This panel of translators will share information about their experiences living and working abroad during extended periods of time in their source/target language countries of France, Germany, Japan, Spain, and Sweden, and how that refreshed their cultural, linguistic, and professional outlooks. The panelists will share strategies so you can also plan and benefit from this type of international adventure that will rock your world.


For even more networking and education opportunities, make plans to attend Advanced Skills & Training (AST) Day. AST Day will offer a selection of intense, interactive three-hour courses with limited seating, plus an exclusive networking event.

ADVANCED SKILLS
& TRAINING DAY

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