ATA 46th Annual Conference
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ATA Activities

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
ATA-1 Opening Session
Scott Brennan and Marian S. Greenfield
Thursday, 8:30am-9:15am - All Levels

Start the conference off right by attending the Opening Session!

Keynote Speaker, Andy Abbar, will focus on the importance of language in helping building local economies—bridging the language divide is the first step to bridging the digital divide. He will talk about Microsoft's plans to expand its localization outreach by partnering with local experts and providing the opportunity to reverse the brain drain.

Andy Abbar has a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from SDSU and MBA from City University, Seattle. He joined Microsoft in 1991 to work on Internationalization of Microsoft products with focus on Office suite of applications. He is now the Director for International Strategic Initiatives, based in Paris, France, of which localization and locale specific solutions are part of his focus.

 
ATA-2 Presentation of Candidates and Election
Scott Brennan
Thursday, 9:30am-10:45am - All Levels

Hear the candidates for ATA's Board of Directors voice their opinion and then make them hear yours by exercising the right to vote. You must be an active or corresponding member of ATA to vote.

 
ATA-3 Chat with the Board—WE ARE LISTENING
Scott Brennan
Thursday, 11:00am-11:45am - All Levels

Share your views on issues concerning ATA. The entire ATA Board of Directors will be on hand for this open discussion.

 
ATA-4 Skill-Building Seminar for Mentors and Mentees, Part I
Courtney Searls-Ridge
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

This workshop is a requirement for anyone wanting to participate in ATA's Mentoring Program as a mentor or mentee. ATA's Mentoring Program offers a different approach from a typical mentoring arrangement because it is mentee-driven. We will look at best practices of successful mentoring relationships, introduce tips for structuring the relationship, and provide guidance to make the program work for the mentees and mentors involved. There is no charge for mentors, but mentees must pay $15 to cover the cost of materials. Participating as a mentor or mentee over the course of a year earns one ATA Continuing Education Point.

 
ATA-5 Skill-Building Seminar for Mentors and Mentees, Part II
Courtney Searls-Ridge
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

This workshop is a requirement for anyone wanting to participate in ATA's Mentoring Program as a mentor or mentee. ATA's Mentoring Program offers a different approach from a typical mentoring arrangement because it is mentee-driven. We will look at best practices of successful mentoring relationships, introduce tips for structuring the relationship, and provide guidance to make the program work for the mentees and mentors involved. There is no charge for mentors, but mentees must pay $15 to cover the cost of materials. Participating as a mentor or mentee over the course of a year earns one ATA Continuing Education Point.

 
ATA-6 Annual Meeting of All Members
Scott Brennan
Friday, 8:30am-10:00am - All Levels

Find out what your association has accomplished and the goals that are being set for the future. Members of the audience will be given an opportunity to ask questions and make comments to ATA Board members and committee chairs.

 
ATA-7 Preparing to Take the ATA Certification Exam: Questions and Answers
Celia Bohannon, Terry Hanlen, and Lilian Novas Van Vranken
Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

This forum is offered for ATA members who seek a better understanding of ATA's Certification Program. The panel will respond to questions from the audience about certification policies and procedures.

 
ATA-8 CANCELED: ATA: The Coming Years
 
ATA-9 Workshop on the ATA Code of Professional Conduct and Business Practices
Courtney Searls-Ridge
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

While codes of ethics sometimes appear dry and boring as written, applying them in real life can create interesting and juicy dilemmas. We will dissect the ATA Code of Professional Conduct and Business Practices and look at some of the gray areas of professional conduct in translation and interpreting. ATA members are invited to submit real-life conundrums for discussion by October 1, 2005 to courtney@germanlanguageservices.com. This workshop fulfills the ethics requirement for maintaining ATA certification.

 
ATA-10 Standards for the Language Industry, Part I: The ASTM Standard Guide to Quality Assurance and the CEN Project of a European Standard
Beatriz Alicia Bonnet, Liese Katschinka, Kenneth E. Palnau, and Jacqueline Reuss
Saturday, 8:30am-10:00am - All Levels

The goal of this workshop is to present the new ASTM standard, analyze its contents, and discuss how it affects the different stakeholders in the translation process (translators, project managers, editors, terminologists, requesters, reviewers, etc.). The speakers will first introduce the standard and go over its contents. The roles of the translation company, individual translators and editors, reviewers, and requesters of translation services will be specifically analyzed and discussed. A copy of the standard will be provided to each participant.

 
ATA-11 Standards for the Language Industry, Part II: Data Standards
Peter Constable, Jennifer DeCamp, Alan K. Melby, and Sue Ellen Wright
Saturday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

Translation quality assurance standards are partly built on data standards. This session will focus on three kinds of data standards that affect translators: 1) the representation of text in various languages (using Unicode and the ISO language codes), as well as new advances in the area of locale identifiers; 2) the exchange of translation-related data (TMX and TBX); and 3) the segmentation of text into word and characters (GMX and related ISO work). Because of time constraints, the session will not cover XML.

 
ATA-12 NEW SESSION: Chapter and Regional Groups Meeting
Robert A. Croese
Saturday, 4:15pm-5:00pm - All Levels

This session will be used as a sounding board for chapter and regional group officers and anyone else interested in creating or strengthening local group outreach and activities. Come and share your ideas, victories, and concerns.

 
ATA-13 NEW SESSION: Regional Network for North America
Esteban Cadena, Marian S. Greenfield, and Kenneth Larose
Friday, 10:15am-11:00am - All Levels

This session will continue previous discussions dedicated to putting the Regional Network for North America on a sound organizational footing. Anyone interested in establishing strong communications links among the professional organizations in Canada, Mexico, and the U.S. is invited to attend. Topics for consideration include establishing a web-based calendar of translation and interpreting events in North America, scheduling training events across borders, comparative ethics and credentialing standards, and outreach and public relations. Volunteers able to assist in coordinating a web-based exchange of information will be particularly welcome.

 
ATA-14 NEW SESSION: Orientation for First-time Conference Attendees
John P. Shaklee
Thursday, 11:00am-11:45am - Beginners

If you are a first-time attendee, the official program may seem overwhelming and somewhat confusing. The presenters will outline a few strategies you can adopt to help make the most of your experience in Toronto. Learn how to chose between equally appealing sessions; how to read the map and navigate crowded hallways; why the colored dots are important; which gatherings are invitation-only and which are open to all; the best times to tour the exhibits; strategies for using the Job Marketplace room; and other practical information. Preconference tip: make sure you attend the Wednesday night Opening Reception, and do wear your colored dot(s)!

 
ATA-15 NEW SESSION: Practical Leadership: Releasing the Positive Energy in Your Organization for Creative Growth
Ann G. Macfarlane
Friday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

Dedicated leaders of nonprofit organizations focus sharply on their goals, but sometimes find themselves tripped up by the process of getting there. Learn a new way to observe how you and your group function in order to bring out the best in your members as well as highly practical ways to let your organization grow and thrive.

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Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
ABC-1 The Government's Changing Expectations of Translation Services
Rosario "Angie" Carrera
NEW TIME: Saturday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

The government is steadily becoming more proficient in utilizing translation services. Historically, local government depended solely on a translator's word for the accuracy of the printed product, but recent national attention focused on security issues and accessibility for limited-English-proficient customers has had an impact. This has elevated the demand for higher standards of service from vendors and independent translators. As chair of the Local Government Language Access Coordinators, Fairfax County (Virginia) government is bringing a serious message from its neighboring jurisdictions related to the issues and visions ahead for government translation.

 
ABC-2 The General Theory of the Translation Company
Renato S. Beninatto
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

Most translation companies are started by entrepreneurial linguists with basic business knowledge. As it happens, the last thing translation companies do is translation. This presentation lays out all the activities a translation company owner needs to monitor in order to have a successful business (vendor management, project management, and sales).

 
ABC-3 Working with Conference Interpreters: How to Succeed with Your Clients and Contractors at Multilingual Events
Cristina Helmerichs D. and Steven Todd Mines
Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

This workshop is designed for companies and agencies that would like insider tips on how to make sure that the client's expectations are being met (reasonably) and that interpreters are qualified and will perform well. Topics will address interpreter recruitment and screening, sourcing and managing talent, and successfully negotiating contracts. Participants will engage in exercises to learn how to set up booth arrangements, plan relays between booths and language pairs, and handle conference documents and multimedia presentations. Venue logistics, contracts, and assuring confidentiality will also be addressed.

 
ABC-4 Get the Right People in the Right Seats on the Bus: Behavioral Interviewing
Kim Vitray
Friday, 1:45pm-2:30pm - All Levels

Hiring the wrong person for the wrong position is one of the most costly mistakes a company owner or manager can make. Behavioral interviewing can help you minimize these mistakes. Based on the assumption that past performance is the best predictor of future performance, behavioral interviewing elicits specific information about what candidates have actually done in their previous work experience. This session on behavioral interviewing techniques and example questions is not to be missed!

 
ABC-5 Editing: Are We Still on the Same Page?
Luis Carbo and María I. Sánchez
Friday, 2:30pm-3:15pm - All Levels

Misconceptions and false expectations frequently occur among project managers, editors, quality assurance specialists, and others involved in the translation process regarding the editor's role in maintaining linguistic quality. The speakers will share practical tips on how to facilitate a better understanding of the editor's role (with assignment and style sheets/checklists, staff training, pilot projects, process evaluation and monitoring, and feedback reviews). These tips will help a company provide quality projects on a consistent basis.

 
ABC-6 Translation Company Division Annual Meeting
Kim Vitray
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

 
ABC-7 Translation Quality Measurement in Practice
Riccardo Schiaffino and Franco P. Zearo
Saturday, 8:30am-10:00am - All Levels

In previous years, the speakers proposed a theoretical framework for assessing and measuring translation quality, explaining how the Translation Quality Index can be a reliable indicator of translation quality and serve as the foundation for process improvement. This year, they will show how they have turned their theory into practice. In particular, they will discuss how translation quality measurement is being implemented worldwide at a translation company, and will share their experience and real-life examples. A demonstration of tools and services the speakers developed to help measure translation quality will also be included.

 
ABC-8 The Tao of Project Management: An Asian Perspective
Mei-Ling Chen
Saturday, 9:15am-10:00am - All Levels

Seattle, home of Frasier Crane, Microsoft, and Starbucks Coffee, seems the ideal place to discuss the spiritual and psychological state of translation project managers. This session will cover Asian values and attitudes that can prove useful for translators and project managers working in a deadline-driven, goal-oriented, stressful, and sometimes even chaotic world. Are you constantly going after one goal after another without being able to enjoy the present moment? Do you feel stressed and burned out? Come and participate!

 
ABC-9 Translators as Editors
Miki S. Allen, Patricia L. Bown, Gerhard Preisser, and Thelma Leoni Sabim
Saturday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

Freelance translators who edit other translators' work know that projects can go awry. Project managers are often caught in the middle. Topics will include: the tasks assumed to be included in the "editing" process; tips for editing under ideal circumstances; the warning signs of a potential problems; and the strategies for making the best of a difficult situation. Panel participants will include translator-editors with successful editing experience, as well as an agency representative who is responsible for facilitating translator-editor relationships.

 
ABC-10 Machine Translation: Translating Automation into New Opportunities
Ursula M. Schwalbach and Franco P. Zearo
Saturday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

As corporations strive to maximize profits and satisfy shareholders, language services automation in general (and machine translation in particular) are seen as miracle processes to reach those goals. What does language services automation mean for companies and their customers? What role do human translators play? Is machine translation a viable alternative? If so, what opportunities does it provide for language professionals? This presentation examines automated translation from the perspectives of the corporation and the translation services company. The speakers intend to dispel common assumptions about what machine translation can do, and will demonstrate scenarios in which it is considered a realistic option.

 
ABC-11 Targeting and Profiling Customers and Vendors Online
Christopher P. Hurtado
Saturday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

Come learn how to use online research and business networks to target and profile customers and vendors. Specifically, participants will learn how to use: Ecademy (the business exchange that connects people to knowledge, contacts, support, and business); Google (for advanced searches); Hoover's Online (to search for business information); LinkedIn (to find the people [they] need through the people [they] trust); openBC (Europe's leading business networking site); Ryze (to [help them] make connections and grow [their] networks); and Spoke (to access people through people [they] already know and trust).

 
ABC-12 NEW SESSION: If Present Indicative, Then Future Perfect
Everette Jordan
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

Just how well has the translation and interpretation industry risen to meet the federal government's increased needs for language professionals? Where are the big successes and where is there still need for improvement? Has the federal government increased its ability to gainfully (or painfully) employ translators in sufficient numbers and at sufficient skill levels? An overview of the current state of play, with real-world examples and lessons learned, will be brought forward in this session.

 
ABC-13 NEW SESSION: Quality-First Management in Translation and Localization
H. Randall Morgan, Jr.
Saturday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

What’s the highest priority in translation? Costs? Deadlines? Quality? Translators, project managers, and clients all wrestle with this question every day. The presenter will outline the quality-first theory and suggest practices required to make it work even when it seemingly conflicts with market realities. He will address client-driven vs. quality-driven strategies, quality assurance procedures, managing client accounts, and sticking to quality-first principles even under "special circumstances."

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Arabic

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
A-1 Principles of Dynamic Translation (Arabic<>English)
Jeffrey C. Hayes
Saturday, 10:15am-11:45am - Advanced
Presenting Languages: English and Arabic

Participants will work on some translations (English>Arabic and Arabic>English) and discuss which options best convey the meaning intended in the source language. Translations completed at the beginning of the workshop will be used to discuss the common principles of dynamic translation. Attendees will come away with a list of 20-30 principles of dynamic translation.

 
A-2 Translation Memory and Arabic as a Source Language
Timothy A. Gregory
Saturday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

All translators look for tools that will help them become more productive, accurate, and consistent. Translation memory applications promise to assist with all of these areas, but how well do such tools work when Arabic is the source text? We will take a short look at the major issues facing translators working with Arabic, including how well computers handle Arabic text. We will then examine some of the translation memory applications and evaluate their performance when translating from Arabic into English (concentrating on MS Windows applications).

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Chinese

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
C-1 Translation as Cultural Mediation, Part II
Yuanxi Ma and Elizabeth Tu
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

One has to know the culture to really understand a particular idiom or proverb. Designed as a follow-up to last year's session, the speakers will concentrate on the translation of Chinese proverbs into English equivalents. Specific examples will be given to show how knowledge and understanding of the historical and cultural background of a given proverb will affect its translation or interpretation.

 
C-2 CANCELED: Rhetorical Translation: Definition, Evidence, and Implications
 
C-3 Un-Snarling Syntax: The Perils of Phrasing in Chinese>English Translation
Michelle D. LeSourd
Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

This presentation addresses common syntactical challenges associated with translating Chinese texts into English. Good and not-so-good examples from legal, financial, technical, and other domains will be examined. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own examples of knotty syntax to add to the discussion.

 
C-4 Chinese>English Translation Workshop
Diane L. Howard
Friday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

Participants will work through a short translation of a newspaper editorial and discuss translation strategies and choices. Topics will include: semantic vs. communicative translation; over- and under-translation; and what makes a good translation. Feedback will be provided on participants' translations.

 
C-5 Chinese Language Division Annual Meeting
Zhesheng Cheng and Yuanxi Ma
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

The administrator and assistant administrator will present a summary of the division's activities in 2005 and plans for 2006.

 
C-6 The Success Kit for Translation Professionals
Dave W. Chen
Saturday, 8:30am-9:15am - All Levels

How can a professional Chinese translator or interpreter survive and be successful in today's fiercely competitive market? Learn how to become more productive and profitable and to focus on areas that bring more revenue.

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Dutch

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
D-1 Keeping in Touch with the Dutch Language
Marianne van der Lubbe-van Gogh
Saturday, 1:45pm-2:30pm - All Levels
Presenting Language: Dutch

With English being so prominent, even in the Netherlands, it is sometimes difficult to know if you are translating too literally, and perhaps even violating the Dutch rules of grammar and syntax. The same problem occurs in terminology, where false friends may lead translators astray. New words or new meanings for existing words gradually find their way into the language, especially in everyday speech. We will discuss the common errors and pitfalls in English-to-Dutch translation. The workshop will take the form of a quiz, loosely based on the popular language quiz show on Dutch public television, 10 door tail.

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French

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
F-1 More Thoughts on Legal Dictionaries
Frédéric Houbert, Invited Speaker of the French Language Division
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels
Presenting Language: French

This is the follow-up to the 2003 Phoenix session ("The Legal Translator and Dictionaries: Friends or Foes?"). The speaker will provide new insights on the subject and explain how legal dictionaries can be used as self-training tools. Based on his experience as a writer and user of dictionaries, the speaker will describe the various approaches to compiling a dictionary, including examples such as the Harrap's-Dalloz Law Dictionary or Terminologie du contrat. Participants will be invited to share their own experience of using and/or writing legal dictionaries.

 
F-2 Current Trends in the French Language: The Influence of Translation and the Responsibility of Translators
Thierry Chambon, Michèle F. Landis, Odile J. Legeay, and Jacques Roland
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels
Presenting Language: French

For several years, we have been witnessing an accelerated change in everyday French usage due to the influence of English. While we recognize that a living language evolves naturally and that mutual borrowing has been going on for a long time, we may ponder over the factors behind this current trend, its necessity, its long-term effects, and the role played by translation. What is our degree of responsibility? Do we have any control over this evolution?

 
F-3 Terminology in the World of Packaging
Barbara A. Bell
NEW TIME: Friday, 10:15am-11:45pm - All Levels

Modern packaging is an integral part of daily life. Countless consumer goods arrive on store shelves prepackaged in a dizzying array of containers, sizes, and formats. Companies design these packages to extend product shelf life and to make products easier to use. Well-designed packaging keeps products safe from the warehouse to the consumer's home. Finally, packaging serves a key marketing role for manufacturers who make every effort to ensure that their merchandise stands out from their rivals. This presentation will introduce French and English packaging industry terminology by examining container design, manufacturing, and marketing, particularly in the liquid food industry.

 
F-4 On the Use of English Words in French Translations
Jacqueline Escolivet and Capucine Seignot
Saturday, 8:30am-9:15am - All Levels
Presenting Language: French

French translators often have to choose between leaving an English term in a French text or translating it. We will discuss: the arguments put forward by those who want to preserve the French language from English interference at all costs; the influence English grammar and spelling has on the way people write in French; the use of English in French texts as a way of creating a community or a marketing technique; translating new words; and the legal framework. We will try and define how to make good choices based on the target audience.

 
F-5 Translating Henry Darcy's Public Fountains of the City of Dijon
Patricia Bobeck
Saturday, 9:15am-10:00am - All Levels

The Public Fountains of the City of Dijon, published in 1856, describes the water supply system Darcy built in Dijon, France, in 1839-1840. The book is important today because it describes experiments that led Darcy to formulate a law on fluid flow through porous media that is the foundation of the science of hydrogeology. This translation project presented numerous challenges, including: the sheer size of the book; its flowery prose; old technology and terminology; Old French passages; references to Roman and Greek water experts; discussions of "new" pipe manufacturing methods; and discussions of antiquated theories of artesian wells and springs.

 
F-6 French: The Forgotten Refugee Language
Jonathan H. Sanders
Saturday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

With 1.45 million speakers (according to the U.S. Census), French is the third most frequently spoken language in American homes. This phenomenon is due in part to Francophone immigrants hailing largely from West and Central Africa. In the numerous efforts to provide services to limited-English-proficient clients, however, French has been surprisingly absent. Aided by a survey of Francophone immigrants and refugees in St. Louis and practicing French>English medical interpreters, the speaker will identify the problem, hypothesize on cultural factors that cause it, and offer possible solutions to improve resources for interpreters and language access for French-speaking clients.

 
F-7 French Language Division Annual Meeting
Michèle F. Landis
Saturday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

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Financial Translation

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German

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
G-1 From the Trenches: Technical Translation Tactics for Today
Jutta Diel-Dominique and Frieda Ruppaner-Lind
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels
Presenting Language: German

This presentation will introduce newcomers to the basic principles of creating idiomatic German texts when working from an English source document. The speakers will address stylistic and conceptual challenges in technical documentation and provide guidelines for translating warning labels and safety precautions. They will also discuss DIN (Deutsches Institut für Normung e. v.) standards and other guidelines focusing on real-life translation dilemmas and possible solutions.

 
G-2 U.S. Product Liability De-Mystified
Mathew Kundinger, Invited Speaker of the German Language Division
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

Learn to de-mystify U.S. product liability and take the right preventive steps to shore up your translations. The speaker will show how attorneys attack and take advantage of many common mistakes contained in operations, repair, maintenance, and other manuals. He will explain why it is much easier to attack the technical documentation than the product, its design, manufacture, or the underlying technology. Drawing upon his experience as an attorney and engineer, the speaker will teach what needs to be done (like proper American National Standards Institute warnings, warranty terms, and layout) to minimize the potential points of attack.

 
G-3 Interpreting and Translating: From the Fall of the Iron Curtain to EU Enlargement
Liese Katschinka, Invited Speaker of the German Language Division
Friday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

The speaker will give an overview of interpreting/translating in Europe before 1989, especially Central and Eastern Europe, and then examine the dramatic changes that the industry has undergone since that time. Topics to be covered include: training; terminology issues; the challenge of EU accession (qualifying for interpreting assignments with the EU, etc.); the workload during an EU presidency; and court and legal interpreting/translating in an increasingly harmonized legal system.

 
G-4 German Language Division Annual Meeting
Frieda Ruppaner-Lind
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

 
G-5 Translating German Financial Market Texts: Terminology Used in the Securities and Currency Trading Markets
Ted R. Wozniak
Saturday, 8:30am-10:00am - Beginner/Intermediate

Financial translators are confronted with a variety of texts which address various trading markets. Annual reports, bank and brokerage market reports, and governmental economic reports all reference exchange markets. An understanding of the terminology used in these markets is vital to the financial translator. This session will provide an overview of the various kinds of trading markets, discussing their purpose and mode of operation. The German and English terminology common to these markets will be explained (attendees receive an English<>German glossary and list of reference materials and sources). This session is for those with little or no experience in translating financial market texts.

 
G-6 German Grammar and Other Knotty Points for German Translators
Renate Chestnut and Susanne van Eyl
Saturday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels
Presenting Language: German

While a solid grasp of grammar is an absolute prerequisite for our profession, there are many borderline cases that leave even the experts stumped. This presentation deals with some grammar issues confronting German translators on a daily basis. The speakers will discuss some of the new rules of the recent German Rechtschreibreform, and then examine some grammar questions that arise especially when translating English sentences into German. Examples will be used from the presenters' own work, and attendees are encouraged to provide some of their own.

 
G-7 CANCELED: Translation of Personal Documents (English>German)
 
G-8 Taking the English>German ATA Certification Exam
Susanne Lauscher
NEW TIME: Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and German

This session is for candidates who want to take the English>German certification exam. The speaker will explain the recent changes to the exam, including the meaning and use of translation instructions. Participants will learn about strategies to prepare for the exam, text analysis, ways to identify translation challenges, and how to use dictionaries efficiently. Time will be allotted during the session for questions concerning the exam.

 
G-9 CANCELED: Das österreichische Pensionssystem (The Austrian Pension System)

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Hebrew

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
H-1 CANCELED: Internet Tips and Tricks for Hebrew Translators
 
H-2 CANCELED: Hebrew Language Workshop
 
H-3 NEW SESSION: Wooly Words: Knitting, Spinning, and Making Felt in an Ancient Language
Dena Bugel-Shunra
Thursday, 3:30pm-4:15pm - All Levels

50 million knitters in North America command a trend that has become the hottest fad of the year. Everybody is talking and writing about it, but what do the words mean? How are they used? Biblical resources, ancestral resources, and above all, the wisdom of the LYS will be discussed. The speaker will provide a demonstration of knitting and spinning techniques, resource-gathering notes, and colorful woolen goodness.

 
H-4 NEW SESSION: Stating Your Limits: Translation in a Time of Terrorism
Dena Bugel-Shunra
Thursday, 4:15pm-5:00pm - All Levels

This is a workshop formatted to navigate the minefield of ethical controversies facing Hebrew translators. When faced with material that aids a cause one cannot support, what do you do? Even flexible ethics can get stretched to the breaking point. This workshop puts the many controversial issues on the table and helps translators plan for the inevitable call from the bad guys as well as the surprising times when translating repellant material supports the cause of good. Several ethical dilemmas will lead to an open discussion and forming a framework of boundaries and the infrastructure to support them.

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Independent Contractors

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
IC-1 Homepage Building for the Savvy Language Professional
Frank Dietz and Rainer Klett
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - Beginner

This hands-on presentation will teach you how to create your own homepage. We will take a look at some of the available software and other tools that help you represent yourself on the Internet. We will also focus on what you should consider when you are planning the layout and content (including where you can register your site). Numerous examples will illustrate what to keep in mind for this project and how to avoid pitfalls.

 
IC-2 Genius is Not Enough (Or, How to Market Your Skills as a Translator)
János Samu and Krisztina Samu
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

There are two main tasks for the freelancer: 1) to establish herself/himself as a seasoned professional; and 2) to secure a steady income from freelancing. What are the common pitfalls, and why could your resume end up in the wastebasket? You may be the most talented and thorough translator in your country, but no one will care if you cannot sell your talent and skills! Learn the right self-promotion! How do you determine the ideal format, length, and content for your resume? How do you get clients to remember you? How do you select your target market and determine your marketing strategy?

 
IC-3 Guerrilla Marketing for Freelance Translators
Greg S. Churilov
Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

In an increasingly competitive market, it is not enough to be skilled in localization issues and linguistic nuances. To gain and keep clients, knowledge of marketing is essential as well. Attend this eye-opening presentation and learn how to expand your business.

 
IC-4 Translating for International Financial Institutions: Targeted Training for Freelancers
Barbera de Bruyn, Claudia H. Engle, and Neil Inglis
Friday, 1:45pm-2:30pm - All Levels

In September 2004, the Inter-American Development Bank, the Inter-American Investment Corporation, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank held the first joint targeted training seminar for freelancers. The specific goals of this seminar were to enhance product and service quality and strengthen the relationship between the international financial institutions and their freelancers. The speakers will present an overview of the issues addressed in the seminar, emphasizing translation and service quality standards at international financial institutions, technical terminology research, general requirements for freelance translators and selection criteria, work methods, and the use of computer-assisted tools.

 
IC-5 The Beginning of Wisdom: Some Practical Aspects of Freelance Technical Translation
Nicholas Hartmann
Friday, 2:30pm-3:15pm - All Levels

Independent translators who specialize in technical material need to do much more than just collate terminology. They need to comprehend the translator's fundamental role as a conveyor of meaning through symbols, manage their time and resources, interact effectively with clients and ultimate end-users, acquire and refine subject expertise, and understand their responsibilities to customers, the language profession, and society as a whole. This presentation is aimed both at those contemplating a career in technical translation and at more experienced translators. Highlights include an original color photograph, lots of French mechanical terms, and one Chinese character.

 
IC-6 NEW SESSION: Claims Against Translators: What Are They and How Can They Be Prevented, Mitigated, and Defended?
Antonella G. Dessi
Saturday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

This presentation focuses on professional liability claims against translators and strategies that can be implemented to minimize risk and exposure to your business. The speaker will highlight claims from an insurance perspective and emphasize the impact and importance of policy terms and conditions. Particular attention is paid to early dispute resolution as a means of avoiding litigation. The standard of care required of translators will be discussed and examples of claims will be given.

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Interpreting

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
I-1 Speaking with a History Maker: An Interpreter at the Nuremberg Trials
Peter Less, Invited Speaker of the ATA
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

An interpreter for the Nuremberg War Crimes Tribunal in 1946 recounts his experiences sitting a few feet away from Hess, Goering, and others accused of crimes against humanity. The Tribunal marked the first time simultaneous interpreting was used in public (with primitive interpretation equipment, including bolted-down microphones and heavy headsets).

 
I-2 On the Silver Screen (Or, How Hollywood Sees T&I and What We Could Learn From It)
Steven Todd Mines and Rut Simcovich
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

A review of some films showing interpreters and translators may provide useful insights on how our profession is perceived and depicted. The speaker will analyze clips from several films made at different times and in different countries.

 
I-3 Legal Translation and Interpretation: Ethics Everyone Should Know
Judith A. Kenigson Kristy, Ann G. Macfarlane, Alexander Rainof, and Timothy T. Yuan
Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

Recent court cases have brought legal translation and interpretation into high relief. There are ethical aspects to working within the legal system that everyone involved needs to know. This panel of working interpreters and translators, who also serve their professional associations at the policy level, will provide key guidelines and vital information for translators, interpreters, judges, attorneys, language service companies, and all those who use the services of translators and interpreters within the legal system. Audience input and discussion will be an important part of the session.

 
I-4 Cultural Interference in the Process of Interpretation
Rebeca F. Calderon
Friday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Spanish

Interpretation entails more intricacies than the linguistic considerations of rendering a message from a source into a target language. A good interpreter has the ability to convey the linguistic message from one language to the other, but what happens when that message cannot be transferred because of cultural interference due to the paralinguistic aspects of communication (for example, someone not looking the judge in the eye because doing so is a sign of defiance in their home country). What, if anything, can the judiciary interpreter do when this cultural interference occurs?

 
I-5 The "I" Voice and You: Some Psychological Hazards of Interpreting
Ellen Sowchek
Friday, 3:30pm-4:15pm - All Levels

A professional interpreter is required to speak in the same grammatical person as the individual for whom he/she is interpretingto speak in the "I" voice. He/she is also expected to accurately convey the speaker's meaning and the style or register of speech, and to do so in a neutral fashion without adding to or subtracting from the original message. What happens when this original message is about the unspeakable? Does interpreting in difficult situations take its psychological toll on the interpreter? This presentation will consider this question in connection with some of the most difficult of all interpreting assignments.

 
I-6 Didactic Proposal for Bridging the Gap Between Translators and Interpreters: Introduction to Interpreting for Translators
Georganne Weller
Friday, 4:15pm-5:00pm - All Levels

How can one break into interpretation? Should you take a course, work on the techniques yourself, or do you just have to take a shot at it and hope you won't fall flat on your face? This presentation is a sounding board for a proposal for a course of this nature to be offered in the U.S. and Latin America. Such a course would be designed for aspiring interpreters coming from a translation background who prefer to have classroom and professional guidance, rather than risk an embarrassing moment which could ruin their chances. This presentation includes theoretical issues and practical training exercises.

 
I-7 Simultaneous Interpreting: A Practical Approach
Carol J. Patrie
Saturday, 8:30am-10:00am - All Levels

Mastering the intricacies of simultaneous interpreting depends on competence in a range of skills. This presentation provides a systematic approach to studying these competencies. Topics include comprehension, transfer, cognitive flexibility, reformulation, and sources of error. Special emphasis will be given to shifting from the consecutive to simultaneous mode. Specific exercises have been developed to address the cognitive needs associated with this transition. In addition to developing awareness of the aspects of simultaneity, you will also have the opportunity to consider four additional factors in your interpretation (your perceived level of stress, processing time, self-monitoring, and self-correction).

 
I-8 On the Frontlines and Faultlines: The Life of a Conference Interpreter at the United Nations
Elena Howard, Invited Speaker of the Interpreters Division
Saturday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

The United Nations could not function and maybe wouldn't even exist without the skilled support of conference interpreters. The profession today would also probably be very different had the UN and other international organizations not given interpreters institutional recognition and established codes of practice, protocol, and professional ethics. The speaker will explain the work of a chief interpreter at the UN and the challenges of recruiting and assigning interpreters. Participants will take part in simulated exercises of the kind faced by UN interpreters.

 
I-9 CANCELED: Interpretation Equipment Demonstration and Training
 
I-10 CANCELED: American Sports Idioms
 
I-11 Interpreters Division Annual Meeting
Steven Todd Mines
Saturday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels
 
I-12 NEW SESSION: Red Cross/ATA-Interpreters Division Disaster Relief Language Support Initiative
Scott Brennan, Debbera Hayward, Giovanna L. Lester, Caterina Vaselli Sullivan, and Rosa I. Viloch-Santiago
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

This presentation will provide a brief history of the efforts put forth by ATA and its Interpreters Division that culminated in the creation of the Red Cross/ATA-Interpreters Division Disaster Relief Language Support Initiative. The discussion will cover the vision that propelled the creation of the project's outline, definition of scope, the drafting of the final Letter of Understanding, and integration of efforts and responsibilities. Representatives of the Red Cross and ATA will discuss plans for the deployment of professional interpreters to assist in crisis situations.

 
I-13 NEW SESSION: Telephone Interpreting: Specific Skills, Current Expansion, and Future Impact
Fabienne Sophie Chauderlot
Saturday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

This interactive session presents sample telephone interpreting calls from diverse clients (Disney, 911, etc.) to highlight, from a comparative viewpoint, the gamut of analytic, interpreting, and customer service skills translators can easily develop to add countless opportunities to their core career.

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Italian

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
IT-1 CANCELED: Do You Know What You are Looking for and Where to Look?
 
IT-2 Translating Italian Court Documents into English: An Orientation
Joe McClinton
Friday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

When is a sentenza not a sentence? What distinguishes a contravvenzione from a delitto or a reato? What's the difference between a giudice di merito and a giudice di legittimità? What's a Gup? And what on earth do you do with all those sentences that seem to go on for 12 years? After a necessarily fleeting survey of Italian civil and criminal procedure and some of the associated terminology, we will finish by reviewing some characteristically tangled sentences from court documents.

 
IT-3 Italian Language Division Annual Meeting
Joan B. Sax
Saturday, 8:30am-9:15am - All Levels

Officers will be elected and the division's activities will be discussed. This is your chance to find what the division is doing and to express what you think it should do. All division members are encouraged to attend.

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Japanese

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
J-1 CANCELED: Such a Deal! Translating Contracts from Japanese to English
 
J-2 Japanese<>English Certification Workshop
Diane L. Howard, Connie Prener, Kyoko Saegusa, Izumi Suzuki, and Kendrick J. Wagner
Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Japanese

This workshop will provide a brief overview of ATA's Certification Program, testing procedures, and grading standards. Participants will work through either a Japanese or English passage that is similar to the general passage on ATA's certification exam. Graders in ATA's certification program will lead the workshop groups and provide feedback on participants' translations. Information about the workshop passage will be posted on the mailings lists of ATA's Japanese Language Division as well as the Japanese Translators Association. Participants are encouraged to translate the passage before the workshop.

 
J-3 Translation Techniques for Clinical Study Tools
Martha A. Feldman, Invited Speaker of the Japanese Language Division, S. Lee Seaman, and Kendrick J. Wagner
Friday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Japanese

Large parts of clinical study protocols are devoted to study tools, such as screening logs, randomization codes, drug accountability forms, patient study visit scheduling, and storage and shipment instructions for samples. English examples of text discussing study tools are hard to find because they are mostly internal documents, and are not readily available on the Internet or in libraries. The speakers will present examples of discussions of study tools that have been used in actual clinical studies. Equivalent Japanese sources text will be also be presented. This session will be of interest to any medical translator working into English.

Martha A. Feldman was recruited by the Japanese Language Division as part of its series of subject-area expert speakers.

 
J-4 Japanese Language Division Annual Meeting
Kendrick J. Wagner
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

New officers will be elected and the course for their new administration charted. All division members wishing to vote on matters concerning the JLD should attend.

 
J-5 In-house Translator or Interpreter—Is It for You?
Keiko K. Best and Atsuko Yamazaki
Saturday, 8:30am-10:00am - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Japanese

People sometimes have the mistaken notion that an in-house translator/interpreter is less skilled and professional compared to a freelance translator/interpreter. The speakers, both of whom have over 10 years of experience as corporate in-house interpreters/translators, will discuss their day-to-day work and the pros and cons of being in-house. Working in-house is highly recommended not only for those who are relatively new in the field of translation, but also for those who want to find their own area of expertise.

 
J-6 U.S. Government Jobs for Language Professionals
Robert C. Albon
Saturday, 1:45pm-2:30pm - All Levels

U.S. government job descriptions are difficult to understand and the application procedures are daunting. Everyone has a friend who was referred and selected, but died of old age waiting for a security clearance. Worry no more. The insider knowledge provided here—online job searches, reading between the lines on job descriptions, resumes, interviews, background investigations, transportation agreements, surviving probation, and more—lets you apply online, interview by phone, and get $50K+/year language-related government jobs, all without leaving home or even getting dressed. The benefits of federal employment are worth it. Bonus: U.S. government translator positions in Japan for Japanese citizens.

 
J-7 Software Engineering Document Translation
Tetu Hirai
Saturday, 2:30pm-3:15pm - All Levels

This presentation will feature the translation of software engineering documents from Japanese into English. Sample Japanese sentences from software engineering documents and suggested English renderings will be given. The technical background associated with these sentences will be given in order to explain why the suggested renderings would be appropriate. Common mistakes translators make in translating software engineering documents will also be discussed.

Tetu Hirai was recruited by the Japanese Language Division as part of its series of subject-area expert speakers.

 
J-8 Professional Conduct in Working as/with a Check Interpreter in Legal Settings
Kayoko Takeda
Saturday, 3:30pm-4:15pm - Advanced
Presenting Languages: English and Japanese

When interpreting for a Japanese witness in a deposition, trial, or other proceedings in litigation, there are usually interpreters who check the accuracy of your interpretation. Issues we occasionally encounter include disagreeing with the opposing interpreter on certain interpretations and the improper timing of corrections made by the check interpreter. Unfamiliarity with professional protocol in this type of setting can also make interpreters feel uncomfortable. This interactive session will discuss best practice and professional conduct when working as or with check interpreters during litigation proceedings.

Kayoko Takeda was recruited by the Japanese Language Division as part of its series of subject-area expert speakers.

 
J-9 Technical Aspects of Interpreting at the Winter Olympics
Robert C. Albon
Saturday, 4:15pm-5:00pm - All Levels

The speaker will share his experiences as an official Japanese interpreter at the 2002 Winter Olympics and Paralympics. He will focus on strategies for preparing for translation in widely varied but highly specialized fields such as winter sports, sports medicine, or local history and culture. He will also discuss ethical concerns of the Olympics and the Paralympics and the lighter side of life in the Olympic Village.

JLD Series
The following speakers were recruited by the Japanese Language Division as part of a series of expert speakers with professional degrees and/or extensive expertise in a particular subject field.  With the exception of J-3, these expert presentations specifically target J<>E practitioners. 
Ken Sakai, ST-4: Understanding the Semiconductor Industry and Its Supply Chain Structure
Martha A. Feldman, J-3: Translation Techniques for Clinical Study Tools
Tetu Hirai, J-7: Software Engineering Document Translation
Kayoko Takeda, J-8: Professional Conduct in Working as/with a Check Interpreter in Legal Settings

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Legal Translation and Interpreting

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
LAW-1 CANCELED: Methodology for the Translation of Personal Documents
 
LAW-2 CANCELED: Prejudgment Remedies: Comparing the Medidas Cautelares of the Civil Law System
 
LAW-3 CANCELED: Stock Purchase Agreements (Translation from English into Spanish)
 
LAW-4 Equipment of Domestic Violence
Alexander Rainof
Saturday, 8:30am-10:00am - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Spanish

Over half of all acts of violence occur in the home and involve a variety utensils, tools, and equipment. At last year's conference, cooking utensils were covered. This follow-up session will include handtools in the garage and elsewhere (hammers, saws, wrenches, pliers). In addition, we will also discuss sports equipment (covering 13 sports) and other entries, ranging from belts to knitting needles and candlesticks to kitchen stools. The English terminology will be accompanied by illustrations and Spanish equivalents. Audience participation will be encouraged.

 
LAW-5 Prosecution in Mexico of a Crime Committed in Colorado: The Translator's Role
Vicki C. Santamaria
Saturday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

In recent years, Colorado has actively pursued the prosecution in Mexican courts of its fugitives from justice. This presentation will be a case study of the legal translator's role in preparing a Spanish-language version of the case file in People of the State of Colorado vs. Ramon Villalobos. Topics will include the laws pertaining to foreign prosecutions, translator ethics, special difficulties in translation, and best business practices. The speaker will specifically point out the multiple problems that occurred during the translation of the case.

 
LAW-6 Language Planning in the European Union for Interpreter Services in Criminal Legal Proceedings
Nancy Schweda Nicholson
NEW TIME: Friday, 1:45pm-3:15pm- All Levels

In April 2004, the European Commission issued a Proposal for a Council Framework Decision (PCFD), a document whose goal is to protect defendants' rights in criminal matters in all 25 European Union Member States (MSs). Specifically, Articles 6-9 of the PCFD treat the right to free interpretation and translation, the accuracy of language services, and the implications of recording the proceedings. This presentation reviews these and other pertinent PCFD Articles and discusses MSs' reactions to them, as witnessed at a November 2004 conference in The Hague. The speaker will discuss opinions on the future of the PCFD.

 
LAW-7 Improving Access for LEP Individuals to Federally-Funded Programs: How the Interpreting and Translating Community Can Work Together to Make it Happen
Linda Quash
NEW TIME: Saturday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

An interactive workshop hosted by the Coordination and Review Section of the Civil Rights Division at the U.S. Department of Justice to describe current outreach efforts to courts, corrections, and law enforcement. This session will address the issues these entities face as they work to improve access for limited-English-proficient (LEP) individuals in compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Executive Order 13166. We seek assistance from the interpreting and translating community to identify linguistic resources and tools, training needs, and define the steps federally-assisted entities can take to meet their obligations to LEP individuals.

 
LAW-8 NEW SESSION: Corporate Finance: Legal and Financial Terminology
Silvana Teresa Debonis
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - Beginner
Presenting Language: Spanish

Corporate finance has become a key success factor for companies and translators have played an important role in bridging the communication gap between international credit institutions and companies. English to Spanish translators who want to start working in this field will soon discover that the close interrelationship of financial and legal concepts (two areas translators need to address if they are to render an accurate translation) is among the most challenging features of corporate finance. This presentation, intended for beginners in this field, will explore legal and financial concepts and related terminology including loan agreements, bond indentures, and credit facilities.

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Literary

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
L-1 Literary Translation for Non-Dummies
Clifford E. Landers and Alexis Levitin
Friday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

This lively, brass-tacks crash course in topics relating to literary translation will focus on preparing, editing, and publishing a manuscript. Questions from attendees will be encouraged and sample copies of various periodicals that welcome translations will be available for perusal.

 
L-2 Translation, Reception Theory, and the Rise of Inter-American Literature
Earl E. Fitz and Elizabeth Lowe McCoy
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

This presentation will focus on the speakers' forthcoming book, Tu to Tango: Translation, Reception Theory, and the Rise of Inter-American Literature. The authors will present their research on the reception of Latin American literature in English translation since the "boom" and the role of the translator as a cultural agent. The authors' central thesis is that translation should have a more prominent place in comparative literature theory, particularly reception theory. They will present an overview of the translation of major contemporary Latin American works and the effects of those translations on the inter-American cultural dialogue.

 
L-3 Literary Division Annual Meeting
Clifford E. Landers
Saturday, 8:30am-10:00am - All Levels

 
L-4 Playing with—and Shopping for—Food, Act II
Phyllis Zatlin
Saturday, 10:15am-11:00am - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Spanish

In performance, spectators need to grasp references quickly. Therefore, theatrical translators have to give careful consideration to cultural gaps, such as those often created by allusions to food. This workshop will examine several problematic passages from English into Spanish by playwrights José Luis Alonso de Santos and Itziar Pascual from Spain and Juan Pablo Vallejo from Colombia. References will include items of food and the terms for the stores where one buys them.

 
L-5 Translation Is Not for the Squeamish: Sex and Other Bodily Functions in the Works of Rubem Fonseca
Clifford E. Landers
Saturday, 11:00am-11:45am - All Levels

The Brazilian author Rubem Fonseca is known for often disturbing depictions of contemporary urban violence. However, this session focuses on the role of the human body in Fonseca's writings. For Fonseca, the body is the visible, omnipresent avatar of the existential condition. Untainted by any shred of sentimentality, Fonseca's work harbors no illusions about the human body—its ephemerality, its power to enthrall and to disgust, its solidity, and its fragility. The translator's challenge is to reproduce Fonseca's tone, eschewing euphemism and linguistic subterfuge to capture the frank, sometimes pessimistic perspective that informs his disquieting universe.

 
L-6 Middlesex and the Translation of Ambiguity
Anton S. Pujol
Saturday, 1:45pm-2:30pm - All Levels

The tumultuous Greek-American saga depicted in Jeffrey Eugenides' Middlesex (2004) is narrated by the charming Calliope Stephanides. Calliope's narration, a playful and ever-present I, is at the heart of Eugenides's success, yet it creates a quandary for the translator because the character is a hermaphrodite. As such, the narration is veiled behind a tricky and ambiguous I. This session will analyze four Romance language translations of Middlesex to show how they deal with Calliope's riddle dilemma, and how they inevitably resolve it by betraying Calliope's idiosyncrasies for the foreign reader.

 
L-7 Paratext in Translation: An Example from Farsi
Shayesteh Zarrabi
Saturday, 2:30pm-3:15pm - All Levels

Paratexts, such as footnotes and endnotes, can play a major role in clarifying cultural points. The purpose of this session is to show how translation can be more effective through paratexts, and how the text added by the translator, such as footnotes, a preface, and afterword, can help the reader better understand the original text. Apart from a cultural clarifier, paratext can reveal the author's ideology and personal background. Such information could be the key to understanding the translation of the work. An actual example from the translation of a Farsi literary work into English will be provided.

 
L-8 How to Translate Children's Literature
Aída E. Marcuse
Saturday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels
Presenting Languages: Spanish with English and French

The session will show the different methods used to solve problems while translating children's literature. Participants will be asked to translate a given page from English, French, or Spanish into English, French, or Spanish. The rest of the session will be devoted to reading and commenting on the translations, including a discussion of problem-solving techniques. Time will be allotted at the end for questions and answers.

 
L-9 NEW SESSION: Marilyn Gaddis Rose Lecture: Translating Under the Bridges in 13th Century Paris
John T. DuVal
Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

Translators of literature aim, paradoxically, to somehow write both faithfully and originally. This presentation will explore some deliciously original moves by a few translators of Canto 20 of Dante's Inferno, as well as try to explain some original moves the speaker was aiming for in his recent translation of the thirteenth century comic verse tale, "The Three Ladies of Paris."

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Media

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
M-1 Pragmatic Interference in the Dubbing of Hollywood Movies into Spanish
Purificación Fernández-Nistal
Friday, 1:45pm-2:30pm - All Levels

Cross-language interference in screen translation tends to cause many problems. Though previously analyzed, there is one issue which has yet to be addressed at length, namely the influence of English on Spanish at the level of pragmatics. The speaker will discuss an experimental study that was conducted using six well-known Hollywood motion pictures that enjoyed great commercial success with Spanish-speaking audiences.

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Medical Translation and Interpreting

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
MED-1 Moving from Cure to Care: The Challenges of Palliative Medicine at End of Life
Richard S. Lane
NEW TIME: Saturday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

The roles of the physician are becoming fragmented, with different subspecialties taking on the various duties of traditional general practice. Palliative care consists of helping patients with advanced chronic or acute diseases find ways of living with their symptoms in dignity and comfort. Palliative care clinicians must communicate efficiently and compassionately, using the tools of medicine to ameliorate or diminish debilitating symptoms, while respecting patients' ethnic backgrounds and spiritual needs. The presentation highlights this growing subspecialty and the essential shift from "curing" to "caring." Cross-cultural issues in end of life care are outlined in a case study involving breast cancer.

 
MED-2 Epilepsy: History and Terminology
Maria Rosdolsky
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

This presentation will summarize the history of the understanding and interpretation of epilepsy, as well as its classification, terminology, and treatment. A description of the history and functions of the International League Against Epilepsy and the current classification and terminology of epilepsy provided by the League will be provided. The tools for translating documents on epilepsy, including the problems encountered during translation and possible solutions, will also be discussed.

 
MED-3 The Anomalies of Mental Health Interpreting
David Cardona and Janet M. Erickson-Johnson
Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

The standards for medical interpreting have been outlined and reinforced over time, but rarely has there been much guidance for interpreters about working within mental health settings. This presentation will provide information about how and why interpreters must adapt their role to the objectives of mental health practitioners, in addition to an overview of the different categories and types of mental illness. By virtue of the speaker' background and experience in training, interpreting, and healthcare, real-life examples and interactive mental health role-playing scenarios will be provided.

 
MED-4 Words and Values: Factors Affecting Translation of Patient-Centered Medical Documents
Elena N. Levintova
Friday, 1:45pm-2:30pm - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Russian

The absence of direct correspondences in the translation of medical terminology between the Russian medical tradition and the tradition of the modern English-speaking world is sometimes astounding. Russian medicine is based on the same western medical tradition, and often shares the same cutting-edge technological innovation. However, due to social, psychological, or ethical differences, certain underlying values reflected in the medical documents are curiously hard to transfer into another culture. This presentation will outline several factors that may affect the reader's understanding of patient-centered medical documents. An awareness of these factors will help medical translators in their work.

 
MED-5 Instrument Development for Limited-English-Proficient Individuals: Cultural Competence Considerations
Alejandra E. Koval
Friday, 2:30pm-3:15pm - All Levels

Health researchers have shown an increased interest in the health of minority populations and strive for a better understanding of the unique characteristics of communities, groups, and individuals with health risks when developing their interventions. The issue of equivalence in language readability and comprehension is one of the most salient problems in developing instruments for limited-English-proficient individuals in cross-cultural research. This session addresses important topics of translation for research instruments and provides some guidelines and suggestions to obtain final products that are valid and culturally and linguistically appropriate.

 
MED-6 Toolbox for the Medical Translator
Alain Côté
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

Is a degree in medicine necessary to become a medical translator? What are the best ways to start a career in this specialized area? Where are the resources to solve terminology problems? Are there study programs to get a basic knowledge of the medical concepts? Is it useful to join professional associations and networks? These are some of the questions that will be answered during this session. This interactive session will focus on English<>French translations, but should also be useful for other language combinations.

 
MED-7 Medical Liability Reform
Marcela D. Pinilla
Friday, 3:30pm-4:15pm - Beginner

Medical liability reform is a hot topic that transcends legal, medical, and social interests and affects everyone involved. It has recently been a major source of political debate. The speakers hope this presentation will help medical translators (and more specifically, medical Spanish translators) to accurately convey the message that the medical community wants to share with patients.

 
MED-8 Symbiotic Interaction within Medical Interpreting
Janet M. Erickson-Johnson
Friday, 4:15pm-5:00pm - Beginner/Intermediate

An examination of the roles of the three parties involved in medical interpreting, and how a symbiotic relationship between them can only improve the communication process, the cultural experience, and, ultimately, the outcome of the clinical encounter for the limited-English-proficient (LEP) patient. The discussion will focus on what the provider needs to understand about working with interpreters and LEP patients, and what the interpreter needs to understand about the provider's constraints to ensure a mutually beneficial encounter for all.

 
MED-9 Medical Division Annual Meeting
Martine Dougé
Saturday, 8:30am-10:00am - All Levels

 
MED-10 Requesting Clarification in the Triadic Encounter
Zarita Araújo-Lane and Vonessa A. Phillips
NEW TIME: Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

There are conflicting opinions regarding the interpreter's role as a clarifier. Some medical providers believe that the interpreter should stick to the conduit role, interpreting only what is said by each speaker. But a sizable number of medical professionals want interpreters to intervene when there is a misunderstanding in order to take care of the situation and speed up the session. This presentation addresses the following three questions: What does it mean to "clarify" in the triadic encounter? When and with whom should the interpreter be a clarifier? What is the difference between "clarification" and "explanation," and which should the interpreter provide?

 
MED-11 Credentialing Healthcare Interpreters in California: A Step Toward Certification
Tom M. Riley and Cynthia E. Roat
Saturday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

The California Healthcare Interpreting Association, with funding from The California Endowment, has embarked on a pilot venture to provide healthcare interpreters with a standardized mechanism to document their credentials. Such an "interpreter report card" will allow those who employ and contract with interpreters to compare the background, screening, training, and experience of potential candidates. An online registry/description of training and testing programs will allow contractors to better understand a given interpreter's background. This presentation will share the process used to develop the report card and the training/testing database, and discuss the potential for this program to be implemented nationally.

 
MED-12 The Multilingual World of American Healthcare: Challenges and Opportunities
Catherine W. Ingold, Angela A. Kurtz, and Carol J. Patrie
Saturday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

The National Foreign Language Center at the University of Maryland, a nonprofit foreign languages policy, research, and training organization, will present an overview of the NFLC's "Language Access Initiative." Topics include challenges facing language access decision-makers in the public services arena, focusing on medical interpreting and "best practices" in the medical interpreting field as exemplified by model training programs and compliance measures at select institutions. Also addressed are the lessons learned from sign language interpretation in overcoming barriers and providing language access for deaf people, and developing a nationwide infrastructure to meet the language needs of an increasingly multilingual client base.

 
MED-13 NEW SESSION: The Refugee Experience in the U.S. Healthcare System
Amy Wade
Saturday, 9:15am-10:00am - All Levels

Refugees are unlike any other type of immigrant. Their overall experience in this country, including their encounters with the healthcare system, is completely unique. Providing interpretation for refugee patients is a challenge that cannot be addressed using the same methods and perceptions as those used for other immigrant communities. During this presentation, we will define the refugee status, identify refugee communities in the U.S., review the challenges faced by providers, patients, and interpreters including health indicators, and hopefully generate ideas for best practices in providing quality healthcare interpretation for this deserving community.

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Nordic Languages

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
N-1 Translating Financial Reporting: New Danish Rules and Terminology
Lise Mourier, Invited Speaker of the Nordic Division
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - Intermediate/Advanced

Following new Danish financial reporting law and the EU's adoption of the International Financial Reporting Standards, new rules and terminology have been introduced. After an introduction to the changed financial reporting environment, this session will focus on the challenges of translating accounting terminology (Danish vis-à-vis international, American and British), including special issues encountered in annual reports and the new financial ratios introduced in Danish and English by the Danish and Norwegian Societies of Financial Analysts. The recently published Danish/English Internet Accounting Dictionary will be presented, along with an introduction to the ongoing work on the Danish/English Accounting Encyclopedic Dictionary.

 
N-2 Scandinavian>English Translation Workshop
David C. Rumsey
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

In this workshop, participants will compare the translation of three pre-assigned texts from Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish into English. This is an excellent way for beginners to check their skills and for old pros to show their stuff!

 
N-3 Nordic Division Annual Meeting
David C. Rumsey
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

 
N-4 Swedish Literary Translation in the U.S. and Canada
Laura A. Wideburg
Saturday, 2:30pm-3:15pm - All Levels

This presentation will cover the issues surrounding Swedish literary translation in the U.S. and Canada, including working with Swedish authors, rights issues, the formation of the Association of Swedish Translators in North America, and forums for the promotion of Swedish literature.

 
N-5 English>Scandinavian Translation Workshop
David C. Rumsey
Saturday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Scandinavian

In this workshop, participants will jointly translate a single English text into Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish. The completed translations will be compared for everyone to view.

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Portuguese

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
P-1 Suitable Names for Brazilian Lawsuits
Enéas Theodoro Jr., Invited Speaker of the Portuguese Language Division
Thursday, 1:45pm-2:30pm - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Portuguese

This session presents a brief overview of the dilemma translators face when translating the names of Brazilian lawsuits. The issue will be addressed with one eye on the U.S. Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the other on Brazil's Code of Civil Procedure. Equity proceedings will be discussed, including how their nomenclature factors into the problem. Basic ideas will be provided on how to handle the situation as a whole and in certain situations in particular.

 
P-2 Translating Legal Systems into Portuguese by Using Equivalents
Ana Luiza Iaria
Thursday, 2:30pm-3:15pm - All Levels
Presenting Language: Portuguese

Translating terminology relating to the Anglo-American and Brazilian legal systems is a difficult task for all translators. A thorough knowledge of both systems is ideal, but not always possible. Participants will learn how to use equivalents to supplement their bilingual English-to-Portuguese dictionaries and other references.

 
P-3 CANCELED: Translation is not an Exact Science, but... (for Professionals Who Translate from Portuguese into English)
 
P-4 Injury and Compensation: When Legal Translation is the Victim
Enéas Theodoro Jr., Invited Speaker of the Portuguese Language Division
Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

This presentation will analyze the problems arising from the translation of such concepts as damages, injury, compensation, and related terms associated with the American and Brazilian legal systems. The existence or nonexistence of specific concepts (e.g., moral damages) in both systems will be examined, and possible solutions to the conundrum explored. An overview of the legal translation field will also be presented.

 
P-5 VocabuLando: A Translator-Friendly Dictionary
Isa Mara Lando, Invited Speaker of the Portuguese Language Division
Friday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

The speaker will explain how to keep the needs of users in mind when writing a dictionary or glossary and how to make it user-friendly. Important factors such as layout and choosing the right fonts will be discussed. Special emphasis will be given to research and how to go about it with the outlook of a translator, the heart of a teacher, and the Internet savvy of a techie. Audience participation is encouraged, especially those involved in writing dictionaries and glossaries.

 
P-6 Some Challenges of Literary Translation from English into Portuguese: From Poe to Rushdie
Isa Mara Lando, Invited Speaker of the Portuguese Language Division
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

The speaker will discuss specific difficulties associated with English>Portuguese translation and some possible solutions. She will talk about double fidelity and other guiding principles, including naturalness, simplicity, and concision. Examples will be drawn from the speaker's published translations, including the theatrical plays Angels in America and Fiddler on the Roof, poems by Edgar Allan Poe and Emily Dickinson, and books by Salman Rushdie, Bernard Malamud, Susan Sontag, and John Fante.

 
P-7 New Materials for Translation Teaching: A Preview
Isa Mara Lando, Invited Speaker of the Portuguese Language Division
Saturday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

Practice materials for English-to-Portuguese translation are almost nonexistent and sorely needed. The speaker will show samples of a broad range of exercises she has been writing and testing with her students for several years now, mostly based on error analysis. Topics include common mistakes to avoid and qualities to strive for, including naturalness, clarity, rhythm, euphony, simplicity, and concision. Other exercises tackle specific topics, such as measurement conversion, false cognates, deceiving words, multiple adjectives, adverbs ending in ly, and other common sources of mistranslations or awkward renderings.

 
P-8 Portuguese Language Division Annual Meeting
Tereza D. Braga
Saturday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

 
P-9 Pães e Doces and Obesity in Brazil; Cachaça, Gemas da Terra, and the Dogs in São Paulo—Portraits Painted by Translation
Regina Alfarano
Saturday, 3:30pm-4:15pm - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Portuguese

A wide variety of themes and topics make up the ample screen through which a country can present itself through translation. Brazil Gemas and their direct link with Africa was the theme of a São Paulo seminar. São Paulo dogs are the main characters of a poem—alongside white sand beaches. Cachaça has been acclaimed worldwide. And while Brazilian bakeries advertise Pães e Doces, the country will have to curb down its taste for delicious sweets to tame increasing obesity levels. This presentation offers shades of a country's portrait.

 
P-10 Sight Translation: Honing Portuguese Language Skills
Arlene M. Kelly
Saturday, 4:15pm-5:00pm - All Levels

This presentation will provide an opportunity to hone your language skills in Portuguese using cognitive strategies that both translators and interpreters will find of value. Using articles on current events as examples, the speaker will cover such topics as scanning and concentrating on key words, text analysis, choosing appropriate synonyms, and paraphrasing.

 
P-11 NEW SESSION : A Primer on the Brazilian Financial System
Márcio H. Badra
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

Decades of hyperinflation led the Brazilian financial system to develop many payment and money management instruments that are unique to the country. This session will provide a brief history of the Brazilian financial system and show how some of these instruments were developed and how they work. Finally, instead of handing out a glossary of terms, we will discuss each of these instruments/transactions and agree on the best translations for them, creating our own glossary on the process.

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Science and Technology

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
ST-1 Offshore Oil and Gas Platform Terminology
Aaron Ruby
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Spanish

There is a large demand today for translators for offshore oil and gas projects. This presentation will describe the offshore platforms using images, diagrams, explanations, and definitions, providing terminology for beginners and experienced translators. Spanish terminology will stress the Mexican idioms used in Pemex projects in the Gulf of Mexico, but offshore oil and gas terms used in a number of Latin American countries will also be given. The speaker will provide attendees with glossary material and other reference aides.

 
ST-2 CANCELED: The World of Catalysis
 
ST-3 Semiconductor Manufacturing
Tom Novak, Invited Speaker of the Japanese Language Division
NEW TIME: Saturday, 11:00am-11:45am - All Levels

The semiconductor industry generates a high volume of patents and, inevitably, litigations related to intellectual property, all of which require the services of translators/interpreters who are knowledgeable about the industry and technologies. This session will introduce translators to the field of semiconductor manufacturing. The speaker will cover exposure fundamentals, light, optics, exposure methods, and lithography equipment (called steppers). Participants will become acquainted with the terminology and commonly used acronyms, and receive a basic overview of the photolithographic process. The session is non-language-specific, so translators of all different languages will be welcome.

Tom Novak was recruited by the Japanese Language Division as part of its series of subject-area expert speakers.

 
ST-4 Understanding the Semiconductor Industry and Its Supply Chain Structure
Ken Sakai
NEW TIME: Saturday, 10:15am-11:00am - All Levels

Semiconductors are a growing industry with a very broad base of various supporting industries. The key customers are semiconductor device manufacturing companies, but more importantly, the semiconductor materials and equipment industries are a large and significant industrial and business sector worldwide. This session provides an overview of the various semiconductor materials and equipment industries, and illustrates their supply chain relationship with semiconductor device manufacturing.

Ken Sakai was recruited by the Japanese Language Division as part of its series of subject-area expert speakers.

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Slavic Languages

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
SL-1 Terminology in Legal and Social Services Brochures
Emma A. Garkavi and Vadim Khazin
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels
Presenting Language: Russian

The speakers will discuss terminology developed during the translation of several legal and social services brochures from English into Russian. Topics include small claims court, collection agencies, tenants' rights, living wills, and affidavit of support. The terms in question, having no evident rendering, have been selected to encourage discussion among participants.

 
SL-2 Boon or Bane? What You Should Know about the English>Russian and Russian>English Certification Exams
Marina Aranovich and James E. Walker
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Russian

ATA's certification exam is boon to some (who pass) and bane to many (who fail). A deeper understanding of the examination process should help potential candidates determine if and when it would be worthwhile for them to take the exam. The speakers, one of whom grades English>Russian exams, the other Russian>English, will go over the passage selection process and grading procedure, offer encouraging advice for passing the exam, show examples of typical errors, and answer questions. Though the examples will all be into or from Russian, the session may also be helpful for candidates working within other language combinations.

 
SL-3 Idioms: A Major Source of Translators' Mistakes
Anastasia L Koralova
Friday, 10:15am-11:00am - All Levels

In linguistics, idioms are usually understood as figurative set expressions. They usually have more complex semantics than words, which add depth and expressiveness to speech and writing. Therefore, it is highly desirable to reproduce them with the utmost fidelity. This presentation will try to identify the most common sources for error when translating idioms. The speakers hope that putting up "red flags" will enable translators to treat idioms more carefully.

 
SL-4 Of Camels, Virgins, and Perrier Cognacs
Konstantin I. Lakshin
Friday, 11:00am-11:45am - All Levels

Errare humanum est, and translators are no exception. This presentation deals with a broad category of the most disturbing translation mistakes that frequently go unnoticed until the embarrassment is too great to admit that there is a problem. We will review a few common types of problems that keep coming back to haunt the end-users of English>Russian business, legal, and technical translations, as well as innocent readers of translated fiction. We will try to identify some strategies for avoiding these problem areas.

 
SL-5 Annual Susana Greiss Lecture: Medical Translators and Medical Dictionaries
Svetolik P. Djordjevic, Invited Speaker of the Slavic Languages Division
Friday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

The speaker, a medical translator, will discuss what led him to lexicography and the process of compiling dictionaries. In addition to discussing his own career as a teacher, interpreter, medical translator (working in French and the Slavic languages), and lexicographer, he will examine the relationship between freelance translators and their resources—dictionaries, reference works, and the Internet. He will also evaluate various aspects of English-language medical dictionaries, mainly Dorland's and Stedman's.

 
SL-6 Between Norms and Style: Translating Punctuation (Russian>English)
Brian James Baer and Tatyana Y. Bystrova-McIntyre
Friday, 3:30pm-4:15pm - All Levels

This presentation introduces a number of issues involved in the translation of punctuation (Russian>English), a topic often overlooked in translator training programs. The speakers will discuss research data findings, collected from Russian- and English-language corpora, that suggest key differences both in the type and in the frequency of punctuation used in English and Russian publitsistika. Other topics to be discussed during this session include the different principles governing the use of punctuation marks in Russian and English, common mistakes made in translating punctuation, and some general guidelines for the translation of punctuation.

 
SL-7 Annual Meeting of the Slavic Languages Division
Alex Lane
Friday, 4:15pm-5:00pm - All Levels

Old and new business will be discussed during this meeting.

 
SL-8 This is a Fact: Mistakes of Russians in English
Lynn Visson
Saturday, 8:30am-9:15am - All Levels

What kinds of mistakes do Russians commonly make in English due to a lack of understanding of the Anglo-American cultural context? Why do English-speaking Russians sometimes sound brusque to their American interlocutors? A failure to grasp the cultural context can lead to serious communication problems or misunderstandings. A polite request in Russian can come across as an order in English, and an expression of an opinion as a dogmatic declaration: "This is a fact." The presentation will examine examples of such verbal behavior and how such misunderstandings are rooted in cultural differences regarding polite discourse, social conversation, and formal statements.

 
SL-9 CANCELED: Mitigation of Cross-Cultural Differences in English>Ukrainian Translation of Financial Terms
 
SL-10 Translating Humorous Russian Poems for Children: Word Games and Pet Names, Pit Falls, Prat Falls, and Tough Calls
Vladimir Kovner and Lydia Razran Stone
Saturday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

This speaker has been fooling around for decades with the translation of humorous and nonsense Russian 19th- and 20th-century poems for children. Topics to be discussed include: cultural differences in children's poetry; Aesopian language and the use of children's verse to convey adult messages; the sound-sense relationship when the sense is nonsense; the particular problems presented by diminutives and grammatical rhymes; and the difficulty of getting translated children's poems published in the U.S. Sample poems will be read.

 
SL-11 The Shtirlitz Context
Alex Lane
Saturday, 3:30pm-4:15pm - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Russian

Max Otto von Shtirlitz, hero of the 1973 classic Soviet serial "Seventeen Moments of Spring," lives on in the curious phenomenon of the "Shtirlitz joke." This no-words-barred session intends to show how a study of such humor can give native English speakers an edge, enjoyably acquired, in understanding the kind of language—slang, jargon, and cant—that one won't find in textbooks or newspapers.

 
SL-12 Slavic Languages Division Post-Conference Wrap-Up
Alex Lane
Saturday, 4:15pm-5:00pm - All Levels

This session is intended to give SLD members an opportunity to provide feedback on this year's conference, especially concerning presentations of interest to division members. This is an opportunity to point out what went right and how things could be improved for next year's conference.

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Spanish

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
S-1 Conference Interpreting for Free Trade Negotiations
Martha Edwards and Steven Todd Mines
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - Advanced
Presenting Language: Spanish

An overview of four years of translating and interpreting for the U.S. trade representative through the U.S. State Department. Participants will learn about working with fast-paced trade negotiations in the Americas, including how to handle tight deadlines, missing text, formatting headaches, equipment failure, and glossaries of all kinds. Other topics include research techniques, working with suspicious sources, regional language variations, and the pitfalls and saving graces of Spanglish in the interpreting booth. Handouts will include formatting tips for overwriting PowerPoint presentations, useful Internet search tools, basic glossaries, and a wish list for future presentations or workshops on this subject.

 
S-2 What Economic Indicators Tell Us... (Translation from English into Spanish)
Silvana Teresa Debonis
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

Stock market analysts, specialized journalists, and institutional and individual investors are all interested in the future course of the economy and inflation, as well as the implications of these factors for different sectors. Participants will gain insight into the economic indicators most commonly used to describe the close link between the markets and the economy. It will also address the translation problems that are frequently encountered in economic reporting in the business press.

 
S-3 Cabanellas on Legal Translation
Guillermo Cabanellas, Invited Speaker of the Spanish Language Division
Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

Many of the difficulties posed when translating from and into Spanish result from the underlying differences between the continental European and Anglo-American legal systems. The structure of both legal systems will be examined and examples will be used to show the difficulties in finding equivalent legal terms in both languages. The speaker will also share his methodology for writing a legal dictionary and the issues to be considered, including: the use of bilingual and other dictionaries; the use of equivalent terms; problems created by different usages in various countries; and the possibilities and dangers of "mirror" translations.

 
S-4 The Quality of Audio-Visual Translation from English into Spanish: A Reappraisal
José M. Bravo
Friday, 2:30pm-3:15pm - All Levels

There are two important issues to keep in mind when translating audio-visual material. First, certain types of errors in audio-visual translations are systematic and can easily be avoided by taking a different approach to the translation process. Second, special attention needs to be paid to the elements that make audio-visual translation particularly error-prone, such as micro-linguistic problems, culture, accents, dialects, and dependence on the visuals.

 
S-5 Spanish Language Division Annual Meeting
Thomas G. Mansella
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

 
S-6 Translating Corporate Webpages: A Corpus Study
Miguel Angel Jimenez
Saturday, 8:30am-9:15am - All Levels
Presenting Languages: English and Spanish

A translated webpage is textually different from the one originally developed in the target language. During a study, the speaker found textual, cultural, and pragmatic differences in a small parallel corpus of corporate webpages developed in Spanish and translated into Spanish. The use of parallel corpora in translation will be discussed along with strategies to better localize webpages into several languages.

 
S-7 La traducción de textos relacionados con la economía, el comercio y las finanzas: problemas y estrategias (inglés-español)
María Barros
Saturday, 9:15am-10:00am - All Levels
Presenting Language: Spanish

Texts dealing with the economy, trade, and finance are very diverse and fall into many different categories. Each type of text has its own peculiar characteristics. Moreover, the language of the economy and finance is not homogeneous, so the difficulties encountered during translation will be different for each text. The speaker will analyze the most frequent translation problems and the main strategies that can be used to solve them.

 
S-8 CANCELED: A Practical English Pronunciation Program for Spanish Interpreters
 
S-9 Translation Pitfalls: Cómo evitarlos
Javier Labrador
NEW TIME: Saturday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - Intermediate/Advanced
Presenting Language: Spanish

The speaker will demonstrate the most common types of translation errors he sees in his work as a senior quality manager at TransPerfect Translations. This will be a hands-on workshop, and audience participation is encouraged. Attendees can expect to leave with a solid sense of the things they have to pay special attention to in order to avoid errors and produce consistently high quality work.

 
S-10 CANCELED: Spanish Editing Reloaded
 
S-11 Topics in Spanish Lexical Dialectology: Time to Retool
Andre Moskowitz
Saturday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

This session will provide information on the regional variation of Spanish-language names for certain tools (including sledgehammers, hacksaws, crowbars, pickaxes, hoes, drill bits, and different types of screwdrivers, wrenches, and trowels) and other miscellaneous devices and materials related to construction (including plywood, tar, washers, ball bearings, and forms for pouring cement). The terms that have been used in each of the 20 Spanish-speaking countries will be presented, and participants will be asked to share their knowledge of regional Spanish terminology.

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Terminology

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
TERM-1 CANCELED: Linguistic Technologies to Improve Translation Productivity: Natural Language Processing-led Terminology Extraction and Management

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Training and Pedagogy

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
TP-1 ATA Research Forum, Part I
Claudia V. Angelelli, Brian James Baer, Christian Degueldre, Holly E. Jacobson, and Peter P. Lindquist
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

Part I: Assessing the Use of Translation Tools—Dictionaries Versus Parallel Texts

This presentation analyzes empirical research on the use of dictionaries and parallel texts in translator training in order to frame a study carried out among first- and second-year graduate students of Russian translation at Kent State University. The study attempts to isolate the effects of two translation tools (dictionaries and parallel texts) in order to quantify their relative benefits in moving novices from sign-oriented translation to more sense-oriented translation. The goal of the study is to suggest more efficient pedagogical interventions related to the use of translator tools in the early stages of translator training.

Part II: High School Heritage Learners Studying Translation and Interpreting—Opportunities and Challenges

Heritage language learners' speaking and listening abilities makes them ideal candidates for reaching advanced and higher levels of proficiency in much less time than foreign language students. In order to reach these levels, however, they need a program that addresses their particular needs. The speaker will discuss two case studies (in progress) of high school students enrolled in a translation/interpreting program. She will analyze the pedagogical challenges faced by teachers, as well as the learning opportunities presented to young bilingual students who are already brokering communicative interactions with their families and immediate communities.

Part III: Informed Consent in U.S. Medical Culture: Using Text Analyses to Train Interpreters and Translators

This presentation discusses the challenges faced by healthcare professionals, translators, and language minority speakers with respect to the informed consent process. It provides examples of informed consent translation problems and discusses the training of interpreters and translators in the development of legally accurate yet informative translations. Ethical dilemmas embedded in the process, given the ideological framework of patient autonomy, are also discussed.

Part IV: Completing the Circle: Applying the MRC Analytical Approach to the Teaching of Translation and Interpreting

MRC analysis was originally developed to identify the training needs of interpreters by considering target-language renderings in terms of their conservation of source-text meaning, rhetorical value, and clarity/cohesion/coherency (M, R, and C, respectively), while simultaneously tracking the mechanics, such as additions, omissions, and lexical or grammatical shifts by which those features are altered. This approach has been adapted and pilot tested in two separate graduate-level programs: an interpreting course at the Universidad de Alicante in Spain, and a translation course at the University of Arizona. MRC as a teaching tool will be described and the initial findings on its effectiveness will be discussed.

Part V: An Analysis of Political Speeches—Conference Interpreters and the Use of Metaphorical Language

Understanding the inferences and being able to read between the lines are essential skills that impact the understanding of a speech by the interpreter. Examples will be given from the early days of the United Nations in 1945 to the present. What linguistic and stylistic changes have taken place during this time? The speaker will focus on metaphors and the way they are used in speeches today. What are metaphors? What purpose do they serve? How are they used? The speaker will also analyze metaphors in the context of English, French, and Spanish speeches.

 
TP-2 ATA Research Forum, Part II
Claudia V. Angelelli, Brian James Baer, Christian Degueldre, Holly E. Jacobson, and Peter P. Lindquist
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

See abstract above for TP-1: ATA Research Forum, Part I.

 
TP-3 Court Interpreter Training in the U.S.: An Overview and Curriculum Analysis
Corinne E. Cline
Saturday, 9:15am-10:00am - All Levels

This session is meant to encourage professionals in all languages to get involved in the training of future generations of court interpreters and translators. It gives ideas and suggestions on how to approach higher learning institutions to encourage them to include such courses in their curriculum. There will also be a discussion on methodology and curriculum planning and logistical issues, such as materials and lab equipment available to the trainer.

 
TP-4 CANCELED: Interpreter Training at the U.S. Department of State: The Role of Heritage Speakers as Course Participants
 
TP-5 Translator Training Online: The Inside Story
Regina Alfarano and Milena Savova
Saturday, 11:00am-11:45am - All Levels

The speakers will discuss the online environment of New York University's translator training program. The discussion presents perspectives from both students and instructors. In addition to their traditional role, instructors in the program are to act as "clients," since the online setting is very similar to the contemporary working environment. Students face much higher exposure as well, which places them much closer to the working environment.

 
TP-6 Changing a School District by Teaching Interpreting
David Cotlove, Elisabeth Scheuer-Sturgeon, and Courtney Searls-Ridge
Saturday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

A unique project funded by the innovative Social Venture Partners is changing the culture of the Highline (Washington) school district through teaching interpreting to high school students. The presentation will describe the special characteristics of the grant, how the initial vision has been realized in practice, the challenges of working within a large and diverse school district, and the benefits students, the school district, and others have received. The whole enterprise has taken unexpected twists and turns, and has led to vastly improved communication within the district.

 
TP-7 Teaching Literature in Translation
Brian James Baer, Marilyn Gaddis Rose, Jill Gibian, and Lorena A. Terando
Saturday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

This session will address four separate topics related to the teaching of literature in translation: 1) The Impact of Competing Translations on Scholarship: The Case of Proust; 2) Teaching Polylingual Texts: What Do Foreign Words Mean?; 3) Publishing Translation Woes; and 4) Challenges of Teaching Latin American Literature.

 
TP-8 NEW SESSION : Building the Future of the Profession: Internships and University-Industry Engagement
Cynthia L. Hazelton, Vernon J. Menard, III, Daniel Q. Roundy, and Sue Ellen Wright
Friday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

Representatives from Kent State University, Monterey Institute, and other programs will present the advantages for companies that establish internships designed to give advanced students in translator training programs pragmatic industry experience. This session involves presentations on the ideal parameters for coordinating internships, together with "testamonials" from satisfied students and employers. An effort is made to bring together interested companies and governmental agencies to participate in constructive discussions.

 
TP-9 NEW SESSION: Training for Interpreters in Languages of Lesser Diffusion
Silvana Carr
Saturday, 10:15am-11:00am - All Levels

In our increasingly multicultural societies, traditional interpreter training is no longer answering all interpretation needs. Professional training is urgently required in an increasing number of languages, as immigrants and refugees arrive in waves of ever-changing origin. This presentation will examine a model encompassing language-specific training in interpreting skills, and marketing plans for students in languages of lesser diffusion. The pilot project included assistance to the graduates in establishing themselves as professional interpreters, and a two-year follow-up. Learning from the pilot will be discussed, as well as recommendations for future offerings.

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Translation and Computers

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
TAC-1 Searching and Researching on the Internet
Anne M. Chemali and Jill R. Sommer
Thursday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - Intermediate/Advanced

Most translators realize how valuable a tool the Internet can be for finding information and solving problems. However, in order to be effective, translators need to develop essential search skills, ways to determine which types of research to use, and ways to evaluate resources to minimize the time spent searching and maximize the time spent translating. This session will show you how to set up your browser, introduce you to the various resources available online, and offer details for step-by-step activities using most of the major search engines, directories/libraries, newsgroups, and other information resources on the Internet.

 
TAC-2 Do You Speak XML? A Crash Course on Markup Languages for the Aspiring Technical Translator
Romina L. Marazzato
Thursday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

The explosion of new translation technologies aimed at multinational companies on a global scale—corporate content management, translation memory, localization, XML tools—has turned many translators into mesmerized spectators of a business built on their very shoulders. XML (eXtensible Markup Language) is a popular data exchange tool for Web and other environments that translators are required to use while working on XML files or using XML-based translation software. This session will help participants understand the technology they are both manipulating and using by covering the basics of Hypertext Markup Language and introducing XML concepts and translation issues.

 
TAC-3 Translation Support Tools Forum, Part I
Alan K. Melby
Friday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

This question-and-answer session invites a spectrum of translation support software vendors to present their products to conference attendees in a panel format designed to spotlight the relative strengths of each. Please email Alan Melby, who chairs ATA's Translation and Computers Committee, with your questions for the various tool vendors to tac@atanet.org by October 1, 2005. For a copy of the handout from last year's Translation Support Tools Forum, please go to www.atanet.org/conf2004/tools. The handout includes links to the files provided by the vendors after the conference—mostly from slides at the Forum—please try them out.

 
TAC-4 Translation Support Tools Forum, Part II
Alan K. Melby
Friday, 1:45pm-3:15pm - All Levels

See abstract above for TAC-3: Translation Support Tools Forum, Part I.

 
TAC-5 There's More Than One Way to Skin a CAT: Introduction to Computer-Assisted Translation Tools
Jost O. Zetzsche
Saturday, 8:30am-10:00am - All Levels

A CAT tool, or computer-assisted translation tool, is any tool that is specifically designed to aid in the translation process. This includes tools for machine translation, project management, glossaries, localization, and translation memory, along with numerous utilities for word counts and invoicing, among others. This session will take inventory of the available tools, categorize that inventory, and provide some guidance on which translator could benefit from what software tool set.

 
TAC-6 Translation Memory and Machine Translation Software from a User's (Not a Vendor's) Point of View
Paulo Roberto Lopes
Saturday, 10:15am-11:45am - All Levels

DéjàVu, SDLX, TRADOS, Wordfast, PowerTranslator, etc. Do you already have any of them? Are they worth having? How are they different? Are they for you? Can they make your life easier? Are they a rip-off? Can you live without them? The speaker will provide an overview of how these tools are used, their main features and drawbacks, and their suitability to specific tasks.

 
TAC-7 Introduction to Word Macros and Their Applications
Karl F. Pfeiffer
Saturday, 1:45pm-2:30pm - Intermediate/Advanced

Macros can assist with common tasks and are tools for automating repetitive processes. This presentation will provide an introduction to using Word macros for translation tasks (e.g., extracting terminology, preparing glossaries or other documents for MultiTerm or TMW import, and repetitive formatting or modifications). We will start with Visual Basic for Applications, the programming language for Word macros, and see examples of recording and adapting macros. Participants will also receive a Web listing of downloadable macros and a bibliography of relevant printed and online publications. Bringing your own laptop along may be useful, but is not required.

 
TAC-8 Why CAT Tools?
Maria D. Cernello De Herbert
Saturday, 2:30pm-3:15pm - All Levels

This session discusses the benefits of using computer-assisted tools (CAT) and the underlying philosophy of a systematic application of their features from the point of view of the individual translator. Apart from the obvious advantages for clients, the idea is to share a systematic approach that has proved to be highly successful in improving productivity, reducing errors, cutting down on boredom, and increasing profitability. There will be a general discussion on the principles that underlie some of the features of CAT tools, including translation memory and terminology databases, and how to make the most out of them.

 
TAC-9 Trados: Beyond the Basics
Tuomas S. Kostiainen
Saturday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - Intermediate/Advanced

Many Trados users don't use the more advanced features of the Trados software package, even though these features can make translation work much more efficient. This is mainly due to the complex nature of the program and its documentation. The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the more advanced features and how to benefit from them in daily translation work. These features include Attribute Fields, Substitution Settings, Segmentation Rules, Project and Filter Settings, Term Recognition, Maintenance, and File Analysis.

 
TAC-10 Free and Open Source Software for Translators
Thomas D. Hedden and Corinne L. McKay
Saturday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

Are you hearing about software like Firefox, OpenOffice.org, and OmegaT and wondering how you can get on board? Free and open source software offers translators the option to run secure, functional, and reliable software without worrying about high costs and licensing constraints. Come see a demonstration of a full suite of free and open source programs that you can start using immediately on a Linux or proprietary system. For more information on this presentation, please visit www.translatewrite.com/seattle05.html.

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Varia

Click on the speaker name to view bio. Sessions are presented in English, unless otherwise noted.
 
V-1 The Language Access Act
Maribeth Bandas, Rosa Camillo, James W. Plunkett, and Isabel Van Isschot
Saturday, 3:30pm-5:00pm - All Levels

Last year, the District of Columbia City Council passed the Language Access Act, which requires municipal agencies to provide interpretation and translation services to non-English-speaking populations so that they may be informed of, participate in, and benefit from public services, programs, and activities at a level equal to English-proficient individuals. How is this accomplished? This presentation will describe the pioneering efforts of the DC Language Access Coalition, current governmental implementation procedures and challenges, and perspectives from the DC Office of Court Interpreting Services and two community organizations that provide interpretation services in healthcare and community interpreter training.