ATA
Sessions by Language


Select a language below to see the sessions offered:

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in the ATA eConference.

session schedule
preconference seminars
sessions by language
sessions by specialization
speaker bios
ce credit
C Chinese F French G German
IT Italian J Japanese K Korean
MEL Middle Eastern Languages N Nordic Languages P Portuguese
S Spanish SL Slavic Languages




Chinese
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


C-1 Nuts and Bolts of Chinese<>English Translation III: Dealing with Politically- and Legally-Oriented Excerpts and Terms
Di Wu and Yuanxi Ma
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will analyze Chinese>English translations of excerpts from legal documents and a convoluted and politically-oriented article to see how differences in structure and expression in the two languages can be handled. The speaker will also discuss a number of terms that are difficult to render from one language to another (e.g., "availability").


C-2 Exploring Chinese<>English Sight Translation Techniques
Liping Zhao and Yi-An Yang
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Chinese)

This session will examine Chinese<>English sight translation. Topics will include common legal terms, converting parts of speech, and detailed discussions on sentence chunking. An interactive approach based on exercises and discussions will be employed. Participants should gain a better understanding of sight translation and the basic skills necessary for linear interpreting, which is the foundation for simultaneous interpreting. Legal and court interpreters will also benefit from attending.


C-3 Tips for Taking ATA's English>Chinese Certification Exam
Gang Li
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Chinese)

The presenter, an ATA English>Chinese exam grader for many years, will provide a brief overview of the grading procedures and exam rules. He will also provide tips on how to prepare for the exam and review some common errors. Attendees are invited to translate a short sample passage. (To request a passage, please contact gangli@gangli.info.) The speaker will grade some of the returned translations on a first-come, first-served basis. The session will be given in a mixture of English and Chinese.


C-4 CANCELLED
Logical Lapses and Trouble with Tenses: Reflections on the Challenges of Chinese>English Literary Translation
Michael Berry
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




C-5 Behind the Lines: Telephonic Interpreting
Huilin Gao
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Mandarin)

This session will provide an overview of the basics of telephonic interpreting, the industry, and technology requirements and skills. With improvements in technology, telephonic interpreting has become a popular medium. Intended for Chinese<>English speakers, this session will be applicable to both beginners and experienced telephonic interpreters. Participants will gain an understanding of how to work as a stress-free telephonic interpreter.


C-6 Chinese Language Division Annual Meeting
Bin Liu
(Friday, 2:00pm-2:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Chinese Language Division administrator will report on the work achieved over the past year and he will share new developments, activities, and ideas within the CLD. Members who have actively contributed to the CLD's general agendas and who have made a difference for the organization will be recognized. Areas that need more involvement will be addressed. The CLD administrator will share his personal experience including the best practices, the best lessons, and the best rewards so that the new administrators (whom will be announced) can build on the current momentum and achieve greater success.


C-7 Better Technical Translation and Interpreting: Practical Research Techniques
Evelyn Yang Garland
(Friday, 2:15pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

It has never been easier to be a good technical translator or interpreter-as long as you have mastered the research skills to take advantage of the enormous amount of information available today. The speaker will discuss practical research techniques based on her experience with highly complex technical translation and interpreting. How do you translate the name of something from a technical field with which you are unfamiliar? How do you interpret a technical term you have never heard of? Which of several translations should you select for a particular project? Specific examples will be provided.


C-8 On "Units of Translation" as a Working Concept in Chinese>English Translation
Zhesheng Cheng
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

There have been intense debates on the feasibility of "translation units" as a working concept in the practice of translation. Scholars have attempted to define "the units of translation" with various circumscriptions, ranging from words and phrases to clauses and sentences. Some people have even configured "units of translation" as encompassing entire texts or discourses. The speaker will argue that "the unit of translation" should be treated as a dynamic working concept capable of adapting its range to different kinds of texts. Examples will be taken from legal documents, classical Chinese texts, and poetry.


C-9 Translating Classical Chinese Buddhist Texts
Guo Cheen
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English and Chinese)

CHANGE: Moved from 8:30am-9:30am to 10:00am-11:00am

The Chinese Buddhist Canon consists of many volumes that fill an entire room. Only a small percentage of texts have been translated into English. We will analyze the history and context for these sacred texts briefly, how they give substance to the translation of classical Chinese (specifically into English), and offer practical methodologies and examples on their various forms, including classical Chinese prose, verses, poems, and commentaries.


Chinese
Related Sessions

I-13 Decoding Other People's Accents: Practical Phonology for Interpreters

 
 

French
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


F-1 The Convergence of Analog and Digital Thought in Translation: Practical Implications
Nicolas Froeliger
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: French)

Translation—human translation, that is—has traditionally been considered a nonsystematic and intuitive craft requiring agility and subtlety. A purely analog play. Yet, the bulk of translators today deal with topics that are technical. (This is what some call "pragmatic translation.") Translators use an increasingly varied array of digital tools. This session will address how translators can make the best use of such contradictory aspects in a profession that is rapidly evolving.


F-2 Quick and Dirty Strategies for Hard-to-Translate French Words
Grant Hamilton
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will provide a rapid-fire drill on best solutions for hard-to-translate French words, which should serve as a great way to start your own cheat sheet for handy future reference. Test your linguistic nimbleness against the other participants and the speaker's suggestions—and take home the best ideas.


F-3 Are Translators Impostors?
Nicolas Froeliger
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: French)

Translators often seek to avoid the limelight, which can work against both their economic interests and the quality of their work. Why are translators so shy? Does their willingness to take the backseat stem from the feeling that they are somehow faking it? What does this mean for the work they produce? This session is based on the principle that psychological factors deserve more attention in the fields of both translation and translation studies.


F-4 French Language Division Annual Meeting
Bruce D. Popp
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and French)

The French Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other French translators and interpreters. Participants will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2013. Specific topics will include division administrator election results, the Leadership Council, ListeFLD, and the division's blog. All division members are encouraged to attend and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.


F-5 Translating French Corporate Law into English
Thomas L. West III
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The speaker will examine the documents that are important in the life of a French société anonyme, including the status and the minutes of board meetings. Audience participation is encouraged.


F-6 Quality Control of Patent Abstract Translation into French at the World Intellectual Property Organization
Aldo Iorio
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The speaker will discuss the quality control (QC) procedure used at the World Intellectual Property Organization to measure the quality of translations of patent abstracts into French. This procedure has identified eight types of error, weighing each as major or minor. This process is carried out to assess translation suppliers and plan the weekly distribution of work according to the best price/quality ratio. Approximately 3,000 patent abstracts are translated into French each week, and a group of 25 revisers carries out this QC procedure. Participants will learn how the procedure is managed to ensure a consistent assessment process amongst revisers.


French
Related Sessions

SEM-E Rewriting for Clarity and Style

I-16 A Taste of Webcast Interpreting

L-1 Sexist Language in Translation and Interpreting

T-12 Picture-Perfect Translations: Methods for Fixing (and Finding!) Issues in Romance Language>English Translations

 
 

German
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


G-1 German Language Division Annual Meeting
Ruth A. Gentes Krawczyk
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Thursday, 11:00am to Friday, 10:00am

The German Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other German translators and interpreters. Participants will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2013. Election results for division administrator and assistant division administrator will also be announced. All division members are encouraged to attend and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.


G-2 Milestones in DNA Sequencing Technologies and Genome Analysis
Edgar Schreiber
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: German)

In den letzten 25 Jahren haben dramatische Entwicklungen auf dem Gebiet der Entdeckung, Erkundung und Anwendung von Genen und Genomen stattgefunden. Kalifornische Universitaeten und Firmen sind fuehrend und massgeblich an diesen revolutionaren Meilensteinen beteiligt. Dieser Vortrag wird einen Ueberblick ueber die Geschichte der DNA Sequenzierung und eine Einfuehrung in die dazu verwendeten Methoden und Instrumente geben. Desweiteren wird die Bedeutung dieser Technologien auf die gegenwaertige und zukuenftige Praxis der Medizin und anderer Anwendungen diskutiert.


G-3 Common German Terms That Make Native English Speakers Want to Bang Their Heads Against the Wall
Ted R. Wozniak, Robin Bonthrone, Michael Engley, Ruth Boggs, and Klaus Alt
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In this workshop-style session, a panel of experts will discuss some of their favorite "thorny enemies," that is, German terms that are difficult to pin down and frequently mistranslated. Participants will be invited to contribute their own "thorny enemies," and everybody will work together to try and find the best translations for these.


G-4 Developments in German Accounting Standards 2012: Principles, Terminology, and Translation
Robin Bonthrone
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Friday, 10:00am to Thursday, 11:00am

German Accounting Standard (GAS) No. 19 was published in 2011 and governs consolidated financial statements and the basis of consolidation. The new "super GAS," expected to be published in 2012, is an update to existing standards that will cover all aspects of management reporting, including revised rules for banks, financial services institutions, and insurers. Together, these two standards are key accounting pronouncements that contain a wealth of authoritative terminology for translators facing the task of translating German financial reports. This session will outline the principles underlying these standards and address in detail the bilingual (German/English) terminology they contain.


G-5 Austriacisms for Beginners
Judy A. Jenner and Dagmar Jenner
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: German)

Have you ever wondered what Jänner means? What is the difference between an Angebot and an Anbot? And what on earth does das geht sich nicht aus mean? What about heuer und neulich? Even if your active or passive German is very good, you may never have heard of words such as Aviso, abgängig, Kolporteur, Organmandat, or Mezzanin. The speakers will discuss the idiosyncrasies of the German spoken and written in Austria. The speakers will review specific terms and answer attendees' questions.


G-6 Wind Transportation and Logistics Terminology, Part I
Sally Chope
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will offer everything you ever wanted to know about common terminology used in wind transportation and logistics. Using visual aids to assist in the audience's understanding, the speaker will discuss all of the common modes of truck, vessel, air, and rail transport terms. A reference handout will be provided.


G-7 Wind Transportation and Logistics Terminology, Part II
Sally Chope
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This will be an interactive session focused on the common terminology used in the transportation of wind turbine components. Using hands-on audience participation and visual aids the speaker will provide detailed information on the common modes of transport including truck, vessel, air and rail. A reference handout will be provided.


German
Related Sessions

L-1 Sexist Language in Translation and Interpreting

LAW-7 Political Differences Between the U.S. and Europe from a Translator's Perspective

 
 

Italian
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


IT-1 The Rhetoric of Winespeak
Giles Watson
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The session will suggest a framework for translating wine texts. Some general stylistic expectations of English and Italian will be examined to explore their impact on wine translation. Key wine concepts and assumptions will be outlined to provide a filter for distinguishing hard information from attention-grabbing hype in wine writing. Original and translated examples of wine profiles will be examined to identify the ways in which content can, and cannot, be reformulated into an equivalent-impact target version. Various ambiguous or hard-to-translate Italian wine terms will be discussed. A basic wine bibliography and tasting glossary will be provided.


IT-2 Italian Bubbles: A Sparkling Overview for Wine Translators
Giovanna Massari
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Italian)

Italy is one of the most important and recognized winemaking countries in the world. Translations in this area deal mainly with terroir and wine marketing material, winemakers' websites, and technical sheets. This session will focus on Italian sparkling white wines, especially those based on the champenoise (or traditional) method, and offer an overview of production techniques and marketing terminology. The purpose is to provide translators with explanations of some technical terms related to the world of "bubble making."


IT-3 Italian Language Division Annual Meeting
Francesca Marchei and Roberto Crivello
(Friday, 2:00pm-2:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Italian)

The Italian Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other Italian translators and interpreters. We will review the ILD's activities during the past year, elect the Administrator and Assistant Administrator for the next term, and plan for 2013. All ILD members are encouraged to attend and contribute with their ideas and suggestions to improve the service offered by the division.


IT-4 Interference from English and How to Avoid It
Beppe Severgnini
(Friday, 2:15pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Drawing on the much-reprinted and frequently updated L'inglese. Lezioni semiserie (Rizzoli, 1992), this session will illustrate some of the main reasons why English manages to colonize other languages. The continuing infiltration of English into Italian public and private discourse will be explored. A practical strategy, based on the 10 principles set out in L'italiano. Lezioni semiserie (Rizzoli, 2007), will be proposed for maintaining a clear mental distinction between these two working languages while exploiting the potential of both.


IT-5 Tips and Strategies for Taking ATA's English>Italian Certification Exam
Roberto Crivello and Francesca Marchei
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Italian)

This goal of this session is to provide potential candidates with an explanation of the inner workings of ATA's certification exam, as well as tips and strategies for avoiding the most dangerous pitfalls. The speakers will offer a quick review of the information on error categories and the point system. They will then work on a general passage with attendees, draft translation instructions, and identify translation challenges. Technical/scientific and business/legal texts will be discussed as well. Participants are invited to read the relevant information pertaining to the exam on ATA's website and submit questions to the speakers before the conference.


IT-6 Author and Translator: A Success Story, Part I
Giles Watson
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from 8:30am-9:30am to 10:00am-11:00am

This session will present a translator's perspective on a two-decade relationship with an author and his publishers. Reference will be made to the translation strategies that were adopted, why they were selected, and how they were implemented. The process of adding value through translation while remaining faithful to the spirit and content of the original will be explored. Relations with publishers and copyeditors in Italy, the U.S., and the U.K. will be described, as will feedback and what to do about it. Other issues will include finding an appropriate voice for the author, dialect-related target-language choices, and managing day-to-day relations during projects.


IT-7 Author and Translator: A Success Story, Part II
Beppe Severgnini
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from 10:00am-11:00am to 11:30am-12:30pm

The session will focus on the elements that go into an editorially successful writer-translator relationship involving both "consecutive" and "simultaneous" translation projects. Particular attention will be paid to the importance of communicating with the translator to resolve intercultural cruxes, matching the impact of the translation with that of the original, and ensuring that target-language readers are able to catch at least an echo of the author's voice. Sharing a sense of humor helps.


IT-8 Insights in Technical Translations into Italian
Roberto Crivello
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Italian)

Should the ubiquitous "performance" always be translated with "prestazioni?" Is it possible not to translate "application" with "applicazione?" Are there cases in which "should" should not be translated with "dovrebbe?" Can a connector handle a high amperage in Italian? Since Italian words are typically longer than English words, will an English sentence always take more room when translated into Italian? Or is it possible to "disassemble" the source text, extract the key information, and compact it for optimum usability? These and other issues in technical translations into Italian will be illustrated through various examples. Practice exercises will be provided.


IT-9 Fuggedaboutit: Translating Problematic Terms in U.S. and Italian Criminal Law
Angela Zorzi
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Italian)

Moving from some examples of problematic words ("racketeering" and "conspiracy," in particular), we will discuss the issues faced by translators of criminal law terminology into/from Italian. We will analyze the sources available to translators and reference cases and prosecuting practice, focusing on the RICO Act and the laws against reati associativi in Italy. By using examples from some landmark cases, we will review some basic concepts relating to criminal procedure in the U.S. and Italy.


IT-10 NEW SESSION
The Use of XBRL in Financial Translations
Eugenio Virguti
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: Italian)

XBRL is an innovative technology that is gaining momentum in the financial reporting industry worldwide. A large number of banking and insurance supervisory authorities, Chambers of Commerce and accounting standard-setting organizations have been focusing on standardizing financial reporting to achieve consistent financial statements across different countries and industries. The presentation will illustrate the benefits that such new technologies can bring to the world of financial translations.


Italian
Related Sessions

L-1 Sexist Language in Translation and Interpreting

T-12 Picture-Perfect Translations: Methods for Fixing (and Finding!) Issues in Romance Language>English Translations

 
 

Japanese
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


J-1 Japanese Language Division Annual Meeting
Masae Y. Sullivan and James Patrick
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Japanese Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other Japanese translators and interpreters. During the division meeting, we will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2013. All division members are encouraged to attend, and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the Japanese Language Division. Come check it out!


J-2 Terminology-Focused Basic Chemistry (in Japanese)
Mizuho Iwamoto and Kozo Igi
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Beginner; Presented in: Japanese)

This session is intended for translators with no background in chemistry. Topics will include: 1) basic chemical terms for elements, atoms, molecules, bonding types, and basic reactions such as neutralization and redox reactions; 2) the naming of chemicals, including classification based on functional groups; 3) basic organic reactions and analytical techniques; and 4) pitfalls and solutions in working on documents related to patents, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology.


J-3 Linguistic Cues for Prediction in Japanese>English Simultaneous Interpreting
Akiko Hirashima
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In Japanese>English simultaneous interpreting (SI), where the word order of each language is almost completely opposite, simultaneity is still achieved. This is done, even in the absence of extra-linguistic cues, by making predictions using embedded linguistic cues in the Japanese. Adverbs, conjunctions, idioms, etc., help the predictions. A qualitative study of Japanese>English SI data, where negative or close to zero ear-voice-span was observed, shows how the process works. More conscious use of these linguistic cues in interpreter training is recommended.


J-4 Introduction to Translating Japanese Financial Documents
Marceline Therrien
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Beginner; Presented in: English)

The kessan tanshin is one of the most commonly translated Japanese financial documents. In this session, geared toward translators without an accounting or financial background, we will examine the basic structure of this document, its purpose, and why it is translated into English. Most of the session will be spent examining the backbone of this document: the balance sheet (taishaku taishou hyo) and the profit and loss statement (son'eki keisansho). Using a sample document, we will first talk about what these statements tell us about a company and look at various ways to find the appropriate corresponding English terms for the items presented in these statements.


J-5 Productivity Tools for Into-Japanese Translation
Kyoko Niwa
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: Japanese)

Outside of computer-assisted translation tools, many translators working into Japanese may not be aware of the many productivity enhancement tools that are available. The complex Japanese writing system requires time-consuming keyboard input due to many key strokes for typing and character conversions. This session will compare some of the tools available that can help reduce keyboard strokes. The session will also touch on PDF-to-Word conversion, optical character recognition and voice recognition software, character count tools, as well as other tips and tricks.


J-6 Japanese Interpreting in a Military Setting: Unique Needs, Settings, and Methods
Carl T. Sullivan
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

National power shifts and an increased Asian focus are bringing the U.S./Japanese militaries into greater interaction (this was highlighted during the recent Tohoku earthquake). Lingering language inadequacies necessitate that interpreters be assigned to facilitate interactions between respective defense ministries/military officials, yet these assignments frequently go unfilled due to the lack of qualified interpreters. Based on the speaker's experience and research, this session will discuss where such needs exist, what kinds of interactions occur, and how interpreting is conducted proficiently in a military setting. The speaker will also describe the training, clearances, and background required to work as a Japanese>English military interpreter.


J-7 The Misunderstood and Undervalued Role of the Check (Not Czech!) Interpreter
Brenda K. Seat
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

A check interpreter serves a vital role in the discovery process, but he or she is often underutilized or reduced to translating documents on the fly during breaks in the deposition. What is the function and role of the check interpreter, and how does it compare and complement the role of the official interpreter? If you have questions about the role of the check interpreter, this is where you will find answers. Learn how you can be an effective and vital part of the deposition and discovery process.


Japanese
Related Sessions

I-13 Decoding Other People's Accents: Practical Phonology for Interpreters

ST-6 Basic Concepts of Pharmacology in Drug Development

ST-7 Drugs of Abuse: A Pharmacological Perspective

 
 

Korean
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


K-1 Patent Translation: Korean>English
Charmy Park
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Patent translation is a steadily growing field, especially for those with Asian language combinations. With the rise of patent filings from the East Asian region, the demand for seasoned patent translators with Asian language combinations is greater than ever. In this session, the speaker will talk specifically about the fundamentals of Korean>English patent translation. Topics will include the skills needed to be successful, common mistakes, and the guidelines provided by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) for approaching patent translation. The speaker will also share her experience working with WIPO.


K-2 Legal Interpreting: Certification and Beyond
Vania H. Haam
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Korean)

There is a high demand for competent legal interpreters, but very few successfully obtain court certification (the key credential for courtroom work). The need is acute in areas with limited resources, such as Korean. This session will address key questions regarding the court certification process and the skills necessary to perform successfully in a fast-paced, tense environment. The speaker has worked as a court certified interpreter for over a decade. She will draw on her experience in the certification process, as well as time spent teaching and mentoring newcomers to the profession.


K-3 Translating IRS Tax Forms and Publications into Korean
Peter B. Yoon
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: Korean)

This session will focus on the skills and knowledge needed for finance and tax translation. The importance of translation accuracy, terminology usages, and correct style and tone will be discussed. The differences between the U.S. and Korean tax systems and the complexity of the U.S. tax system will be explained. Current translations of Korean tax forms and publications on the IRS website will be presented.


K-4 CAT Tools for Korean Translators
Peter B. Yoon
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: Korean)

Although many Korean translators have purchased computer-assisted translation (CAT) tools, the software remains underutilized. This session will focus on the issues and limits of using CAT tools in English<>Korean translations and how to solve the issues of Korean fonts and file types. The new features of CAT technologies, including AutoSuggest, linking machine translations, editing, and quality assurance will also be reviewed. A sample text will be translated using SDL Trados to show what the translation process involves.


K-5 Korean Language Division Annual Meeting
Jisu Kim
(Friday, 3:45pm-4:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Korean Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other Korean interpreters and translators. We will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2013. All division members are encouraged to attend, and non-members are invited to come learn more about the Korean Language Division.


K-6 Workshop on Korean Language Reference Material
Jisu Kim
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: Korean)

Competent interpreters and translators must keep up with an ever-changing world and study terminology and concepts for assignments across a spectrum of disciplines. Accordingly, identifying and selecting appropriate reference material, including books and websites, is essential for carrying out each assignment successfully. This session will focus on strategies for identifying and utilizing various reference books and websites that are useful for Korean interpreters and translators. Participants will be asked to expand the list of useful reference books and websites available on the website of ATA's Korean Language Division.


K-7 Introduction to Acupuncture and Asian Medicine
Brian Kim
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: Korean)

Although still relatively new to the U.S., public demand for oriental medicine as an alternative and complementary system of medical practice has grown tremendously over the past few decades, as more and more Americans become interested in physical wellness, disease prevention, and pain management. This trend has led to the establishment of certification, accreditation, and licensure for the oriental medicine field. Even insurance companies are beginning to offer coverage for oriental medicine treatment. This session will introduce the fundamentals of oriental medicine, including definitions, key terms, conditions treated, and treatment methods in both English and Korean for medical interpreters and translators.


K-8 Understanding Oriental Medicine Treatment
Brian Kim
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: Korean)

In this session, the speaker will provide a practical, hands-on introduction to the diagnosis and treatment methods of oriental medicine, including acupuncture, acupressure, herbs, breathing techniques, moxibustion, and cupping, through visual images and physical demonstrations. He will also introduce and distribute reference material on oriental medicine terminology and information on insurance claims in both Korean and English.


K-9 NEW SESSION
Understanding and Interpreting Proverbs and Idioms from Korean<>English
Caroline K Kim
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: Korean)

The speaker will examine Korean and English proverbs, idioms, and maxims used in legal proceedings. Participants will learn the origin, culture, and philosophy behind proverbs and certain idioms, including their definition, history, and use in communication. Participants will be encouraged to derive equivalent interpretations for these proverbs while attempting to keep the same register, meaning, and connotation.


 
 

Middle Eastern Languages
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


MEL-1 Technical Challenges Facing Arabic Translators
Louay M. Abdulla
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session will provide tips on dealing with the technical challenges facing Arabic>English translators. Those challenges include: dealing with source files containing graphics or pdf files; charts and graphs within Word and PowerPoint; Desktop publishing and the use of Illustrator; and using Photoshop and InDesign to translate publications into Arabic. Almost all of the tips apply to all right-to-left languages.


MEL-2 Arabic Language Division Annual Meeting
Faiza A. Sultan and Heather Knight Wiersema
(Thursday, 2:00pm-2:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Arabic Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other Arabic translators and interpreters. During the division meeting, we will introduce the ALD leadership council members and plan for 2013. All ALD members are encouraged to attend and contribute their ideas and suggestions to improve the service offered by the division.


MEL-3 Understanding and Passing the Arabic>English Certification Exam
Jeffrey C. Hayes
(Thursday, 2:15pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Arabic)

This interactive presentation will help candidates for ATA's Arabic>English certification exam to be better equipped to pass it. The session will cover how graders mark and assign error points and the standards that must be met to pass the examination. A sample passage will be examined together. Those who plan to attend may request the sample passage from the presenter at hayestranslation@gmail.com prior to the session and have their translations incorporated into the composite passage to be discussed.


MEL-5 Style in Arabic Translation: Keeping the Golden Mean
Nahla Baydoun
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Arabic)

When translating any text, translators make stylistic decisions that affect the perception of the message being conveyed. Through various translation examples drawn from Arabic literary and nonliterary texts, the speaker will explore the Arabic translator's endeavor—and sometimes dilemma—to find a balance between stylistic containment and excess in order to reflect the message's inner truth without saying too much or too little. Translation is an interpretative process and is always perfectible. Translators must resist deforming the text by interpreting it too much.


Middle Eastern Languages
Related Sessions

L-6 Re-Translation: Do We Really Need It?

L-8 Translating the Untranslatable

L-9 Translating a Poem: Balancing Between the Literal and the Emotional

ST-1 Translating for the Design and Construction Professions in Israel

T-10 Archaeological Translation

 
 

Nordic Languages
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N-1 Scandinavian>English Translation Workshop
David C. Rumsey
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will examine translation challenges in Swedish>English and Danish>English to help prepare translators for ATA's certification exam and other practical applications. Examples will come from a variety of general, technical, and business translation texts. Compare your style and skills with other translators in this stimulating workshop.


N-2 Nordic Division Annual Meeting
Tapani J. Ronni
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Nordic Division Annual Meeting offers its members an excellent opportunity to meet and network with other Nordic-language translators and interpreters. All division members are encouraged to attend. Nonmembers are also invited to come learn more about the division. We will review the division's activities over the past year, as well as develop a plan for 2013. Specific items on this year's agenda: Connecting with translator organizations in the Scandinavian countries, reaching out to chambers of commerce, ND on LinkedIn, the ND website, and the ND Blog.


 
 

Portuguese
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P-1 Chemistrese for Dummies
Ana Valeria Ivonica
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: Portuguese)

What is the difference between ethanol and ethylic alcohol? Is sulfite a good translation for sulphite? And for sulphide? Are they the same? Chemistry terminology may seem straightforward during translation, but can be misleading for those without a background in that field. Some of the pitfalls include false cognates, spelling mistakes, and confusing trade names and official names. This session will discuss a number of such errors and how to avoid them. The speaker will also show how you can learn chemical nomenclature for a number of groups and compounds by referring to reliable sources in both English and Portuguese.


P-2 CANCELLED
Shipping: Um mar de traduções
Ricardo Souza
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: Portuguese)




P-3 When a Claim Is Not a Claim: Criminal Terminology in Brazilian Law
Ana Luiza Iaria
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Portuguese)

CHANGE: Moved from 3:45pm-5:00pm to 2:00pm-3:15pm

As with any branch of law, criminal law has its own terminological challenges for translators in that many of the most popular and commonly used terms are not what they seem when it comes to the law. We will be covering the main terms and concepts in criminal law and discussing how to avoid the main traps posed by seemingly related terms such as inquérito, interrogatório, and queixa-crime.


P-4 Translating 21st-Century English Prose
Jayme Costa Pinto
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English and Portuguese)

In 2010, English author David Nicholls gave the world a little gem of a book called One Day. The Portuguese translation of the novel became an instant hit, propelled by Nicholls' sharp dialogue and wry insight, a combination at once challenging and rewarding for translators. Nicholls' syntactically ingenious flow of words reflects cleverly the richness of contemporary English prose and calls on the translator to maintain such freshness in the target language. This session will include some translation theory groundwork and the analysis of excerpts in both languages. Participants will contribute solutions concerning idiomatic usage and equivalence issues at the lexical and syntactic levels.


P-5 The 20 Most Common Grammatical Errors in Portuguese
Daniela Mochny
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: Portuguese)

Delivering grammatically correct translations is the responsibility of professional translators. The speaker, a quality assurance expert, will show that improving the writing mechanics of Portuguese documents invariably improves the finished product. The task requires sound and profound knowledge of the language. The major error classes relevant to native Portuguese translators, editors, and proofreaders will be exhibited. The forgotten rules of grammar will be detailed. A practical exercise will be offered, exemplifying tricky passages that present translation challenges and the secrets of high-quality translations. This session will focus on technical translation in finance and law.


P-6 Portuguese Language Division Annual Meeting
Tereza D. Braga
(Friday, 2:00pm-2:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

We will discuss several PLD-related topics including our newsletter/blog, the presentation of the Leadership Council, reinstatement of Portuguese track sessions, member introductions, the mid-year conference in 2013, and other items of interest.


P-7 English and Brazilian Portuguese: Languages Across Cultures or Cultures Across Languages?
Regina H. E. Alfarano
(Friday, 2:15pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: Portuguese)

Brazilian Portuguese has been greatly influenced by English over many decades. Initially seen as "interference," the process has developed into both language and cultural assimilation in a very peculiar fashion, moving from professional/technical jargon to trendy expressions, from colloquial expressions to unique adaptations, and from "foreign" words to "newly created" words. The session will provide real-life examples and scenarios of "language acculturation."


P-8 Translating Important Terms and Acronyms in Civil Aviation into Portuguese
Fernanda Silva
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Portuguese)

Linguists, specialists, and technicians working in the aviation field face many challenges when translating terms and acronyms. Is it mandatory to translate them in all situations within the aviation world? Is it viable to translate and complement terms and acronyms with additional information? When does translating put operational safety at risk? These and other questions will be explored during this session.


Portuguese
Related Sessions

I-16 A Taste of Webcast Interpreting

T-12 Picture-Perfect Translations: Methods for Fixing (and Finding!) Issues in Romance Language>English Translations

 
 

Spanish
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S-1 Criminal Justice Terms 101 (English>Spanish)
Sandro Tomasi
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Have you ever thought of translating or interpreting criminal law, but felt intimidated by legal translation? Do you work in a hospital or social services environment where it would be handy to know the perfect translation for a criminal justice term? This session will provide an introductory list of bread-and-butter criminal justice terms in English and present their functional equivalents in Spanish.


S-2 A Federal Criminal Case: From Initial Appearance to Sentencing and Beyond
Ana Lorena Lefebvre
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Spanish)

When is the information not "la información" and the court not "el tribunal?" In U.S. district courts, of course! This session will follow, from an interpreter's viewpoint, a federal criminal prosecution, from initial appearance to sentencing to a Rule 35 motion. The documents involved (criminal complaint, criminal information, indictment, plea agreement, etc.) and a few rules (Rule 5, Section 3553a, Rule 35 motion, Section 5K1.1) will be explained. The opening and closing proclamations will be parsed and translated into Spanish. Spanish translations of key terminology will also be provided.


S-3 Lingüística forense: Análisis del lenguaje más allá de la interpretación
Silvia San Martin
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: Spanish)

From a theoretical and practical perspective, this session will address the analysis of language evidence in legal proceedings. The first part introduces forensic linguistics as a science and defines linguistic analysis not as an interpretation of what a text means, but an explanation of why and how it means what it does. The second part examines several recent criminal cases involving Spanish speakers where a few simple words, erroneously translated (or inserted), turned out to be crucial for the defense and prosecution. Learn the latest trends in language studies and how to best prepare and defend your own translation.


S-4 Capitalization in English and Spanish
María Barros
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

Capitalization, like other writing conventions, is often a secondary concern in translation, but can be a source of interference, particularly when both languages are closely related. Spanish capitalization rules have been expanded and clarified in the new edition of the Ortografía de la lengua española. Published in 2010, it contains an entire chapter on the subject. However, finding the rules is not always easy, as the chapter is over 100 pages long and there is no thematic index. The speaker will analyze the main cases in which Spanish capitalization rules differ from English, grouped by categories.


S-5 Anglicisms and Their Various Shapes
Marilyn Zeledon
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

As English>Spanish translators living in the U.S., we have to protect ourselves from the permanent interference of the English language in our translations, which we sometimes fail to see due to its prevalence. Anglicisms appear in various forms (lexical, pragmatic, and structural). This session will review the most salient anglicisms that tend to invade our translations and provide tips on how to avoid them. A list of the most common anglicisms will be provided.


S-6 Not Your Father's Bureau: A Look at Today's Roles of Linguists within the Federal Bureau of Investigation
Monica F. Alvarez
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The FBI has changed to meet evolving threats. FBI linguists have also transformed themselves to keep up with changing times. As their roles have changed, so have the opportunities available to linguists and the training and technology that the Bureau employs to stay on top of foreign language demands.


S-7 My Tijuana Family
Rogelio Camacho
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

CHANGE: Moved from Friday to Saturday

Elvis Lopez is studying Spanish in college. Confident in his language skills, he decides to go visit some relatives in Tijuana. To his surprise, he understands less than he could have ever imagined! The Spanish that he hears is not in any of his books. In this session, participants will identify and translate 150 nonacademic Mexican Spanish words and expressions. The vocabulary acquired from this session will be applicable to day-to-day work.


S-8 Best Practices for Spanish Technical Writing
Mario E. Chávez
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Advanced; Presented in: Spanish)

Spanish translators engaged in technical translation are also technical writers, helping to shape the style and presentation of technical documentation. Writing procedures, white papers, patents, material safety data sheets, and user manuals require more than just language and writing skills. Because the field of technical writing in Spanish is so underdeveloped, where can translators find guidelines and best practices? Spanish style manuals tend to ignore the topic. In this session, participants will discuss these issues and learn tips to write in a more standard, consistent, and Spanish-friendly way.


S-9 Spanish Language Division Annual Meeting
Marcela A. Jenney-Reyes
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

The Spanish Language Division Annual Meeting offers division members the opportunity to meet, network, and learn the direction and activities of the division during the past year and its plans for the future. All division members are encouraged to attend. Nonmembers are also invited to come and learn about the division. During this year's meeting, in addition to a detailed report on the division's activities, we will be providing the election results for the new division administrative team.


S-10 Español neutro: Esa lengua inexistente a la que muchos traducimos
Aurora Humarán
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

Si bien algunos colegas afirman que el español neutro no existe -mientras otros confiesan que odian traducir a español neutro-, en nuestro globalizado mundo, cada vez recibimos más pedidos de traducción hacia esa variedad lingüística. Analizaré su nombre, sus usos y los escasos recursos con los que contamos para abordarlo. Compartiré un trabajo de investigación que realicé con hispanohablantes de varios países, que prueba que las dificultades terminológicas son menos importantes que otros escollos que podemos encontrar en el camino y que hacen de la traducción al español neutro una tarea muy compleja, casi una maniobra a ciegas.


S-11 Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts
Alfonso Villasenor
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday to Friday

This session will examine numerous issues associated with the equivalent interpretation of slang and taboo expressions from Mexican Spanish into English in a courtroom setting. The complexity and occasional raw nature of this type of language can pose technical challenges for court interpreters that extend far beyond the mere understanding of terminology. Moreover, the prevalence of Mexican Spanish in U.S. courts makes it particularly relevant compared to other versions of the language. The speaker will encourage participants to venture outside their comfort zone and recognize the importance of achieving adequate proficiency in the lower registers of both languages.


S-12 An Overview of Spanish Monolingual Law Dictionaries
Sandro Tomasi
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What is the lexicographical counterpart to Black's Law Dictionary in Spanish? What is a good basic law dictionary in Spanish? Which one would be good for you? Featuring a discussion of over 20 monolingual law dictionaries in Spanish, this session will answer these questions and more so that you can make a wise investment in your future.


S-13 Translating with Confidence: Effective Solutions to Common Roadblocks
Daniel Tamayo
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Spanish)

Translators constantly face the need to defend their translation choices when questioned by clients, editors, and test graders. Using a variety of English texts from law, business, science, and journalism, the speaker will explore key strategies that will help you make translation decisions that you can defend quite successfully. The speaker will offer clear solutions to the common challenges faced when translating technical material, including acronyms and concepts, that do not transfer easily into the Spanish-speaking world.


Spanish
Related Sessions

SEM-F English-Spanish Criminal Procedure Law Terminology: Latin-American Reforms

SEM-G Translating Financial Analysis (Spanish>English)

SEM-M Advanced Spanish>English Legal Translation Workshop

SEM-N Translating Clinical Trial Protocols (English>Spanish)

I-13 Decoding Other People's Accents: Practical Phonology for Interpreters

I-16 A Taste of Webcast Interpreting

LAW-5 Essential Anatomy and Physiology for Judiciary Interpreters

LAW-6 Immigration Jargon: Interpreting in a World Apart

T-2 Anatomy of a Multilingual Style Guide

T-12 Picture-Perfect Translations: Methods for Fixing (and Finding!) Issues in Romance Language>English Translations

V-1 Toward Better Translation and Interpreting Services in the K-12 Setting

 
 

Slavic Languages
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SL-1 Slavic Languages Division Roundtable: Translation versus Interpreting
Jennifer L. Guernsey, Yuliya Tsaplina, Emma Garkavi, Natalia Petrova, Lynn Visson, Boris M. Silversteyn, and Elena Bogdanovich-Werner
(Thursday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This roundtable discussion will feature professional translators and interpreters from varied fields, including business, legal, literary, and medical. Each panelist will make a short introductory statement and discuss the challenges they encounter. This will be followed by a discussion of how the experiences of both interpreters and translators can prove to be mutually enriching (and, occasionally, frustrating). The issues discussed will be applicable to both Slavic and other languages.


SL-2 Approximately 25 Dreams of Dagestan
Lydia Razran Stone
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker has identified a number of English translations of Lermontov's famous and seemingly semantically straightforward 20-line rhymed iambic pentameter poem, The Dream. Translators range from Vladimir Nabokov to apparent rank amateurs. Through a comparison if these translations, the speaker will attempt to develop some metrics of translation quality, based on all but the most subjective elusive aspects of semantic and formal fidelity and other desiderata.


SL-3 Objects, Subjects, Power Verticals, and Party Lines: Differing Mental Constructs in Russian and English
Nora S. Favorov
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Across cultures, cognates never occupy exactly the same semantic space. Many of the most troublesome Russian>English cognates involve spatial concepts and relationships between people and/or things. This session will focus on practical solutions in dealing with such terms as bases, objects, subjects, lines, and other imperfect English>Russian cognates. While primarily for Russian>English translators, this session should be of interest to translators and interpreters working in both directions. Numerous examples from the speaker's own practice will be provided and audience feedback is expected and encouraged.


SL-4 Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian: Translating and Interpreting War Crimes Trials
Marijana Nikolic
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Friday to Saturday

The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia was established in 1993 as a measure for restoring peace in the region. Almost two decades later, its success can be measured-not only by the number of convictions it has reached or the jurisprudence it has generated-but also by the way it has enabled communication and understanding amongst its participants and reached out to the communities concerned. This presentation will focus on the challenges of translating and interpreting complex types of text and discourse in the adversarial environment of international criminal trials.


SL-5 Lacunas in Translation
Anastasia L. Koralova
(Friday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The tapestry of our native tongue seems to be perfectly solid until we start translating. Only then do we notice that it has some holes in it. They are lacunas, which indicate that the language has bypassed some concepts, leaving them without names. As a result, some words or set expressions may have no equivalent in the target language even though the concepts they designate are common in both cultures. Should the translator circumvent those holes or try to "patch" them? If a patch is attempted, what kind should be chosen?


SL-6 Slavic Languages Division Annual Meeting
Lucy Gunderson
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

The Slavic Languages Division Annual Meeting offers division members a chance to meet and network with other translators and interpreters. Participants will review the division's activities during the past year and plan for 2013. All division members are encouraged to attend and nonmembers are invited to come learn more about the division.


SL-7 Autopsy Reports in Polish and English: Translation, Terminology, and Style
Magdalena Perdek
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Polish)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday to Friday

Autopsy reports are important medicolegal documents crucial in criminal or civil proceedings and reflecting the scientific expertise of a medical examiner. Their content and style varies considerably in Polish and English, mainly due to different legal systems and procedures. In this session, the format of a Polish autopsy report will be presented along with major formal, terminological, and stylistic problems likely to occur when translating it into English. Polish and American autopsy reports will be then compared. English terminology and style will be presented following the guidelines for autopsy reports issued by autopsy pathologists.


SL-8 How to Enter the Russian Translation Market
Natalie Shahova
(Saturday, 3:45pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

American translators in the Russian>English pair should not overlook opportunities to offer their services in the enormous and rapidly growing Russian translation market. However, partnering with customers located abroad involves some challenges. This session will include a general profile of Russian customers, a description of the typical problems that may arise in working with them, and approaches to finding solutions.



Slavic Languages
Related Sessions

I-13 Decoding Other People's Accents: Practical Phonology for Interpreters

   
   
   
   
   
L-1 Sexist Language in Translation and Interpreting

   
   
   
   
   
L-7 Specific Use of Metaphor in Fiction and Its Translation

   
   
   
   
   


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