ATA

ATA Conference
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ATA ATA Activities FIN Financial T&I
I Interpreting IC Independent Contractors
L Literary Translation LAW Legal T&I
LSC Language Services Companies LT Language Technology
MED Medical T&I ST Science & Technology
T Translation TIP Translation & Interpreting Professions
TP Training and Pedagogy TRM Terminology




ATA Activities
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ATA-1 Orientation Session for First-Time Conference Attendees
Jill R. Sommer and Corinne McKay
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Is this your first time attending ATA's Annual Conference? Do not be shy—we would love to meet you! The speakers will provide tips to help you get the most out of the conference and answer your questions. This will be a great opportunity to network with other first-time attendees from around the country and around the world!


ATA-2 ATA Mentoring Program Orientation
Paula Gordon, Eric Chiang, and Susanne van Eyl
(Thursday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will provide an orientation for members interested in becoming a mentor or mentee in ATA's Mentoring Program. Attendees will learn how ATA's Mentoring Program works, who is eligible to be a mentee, who is eligible to be a mentor, and when and how to submit an application.


ATA-3 Preparing to Take ATA's Certification Exam: Questions and Answers
Geoffrey Koby and Jonathan Mendoza
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Beginner; Presented in: English)

This forum will be of interest to ATA members seeking a better understanding of ATA's certification exam. The speaker will answer questions about certification policies and procedures. Tips on how to prepare for the exam will also be given.


ATA-4 ATA Code of Ethics and Professional Practice Workshop
Caitilin Walsh
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

While codes of ethics sometimes appear dry and boring as written, applying them in real life can create interesting and juicy dilemmas. We will examine how ATA's Code of Ethics and Professional Practice applies to real-life situations and discuss some of the gray areas of professional conduct in translation and interpreting. This session fulfills the ethics requirement for maintaining ATA certification.


ATA-5 Buddies and Newbies Debriefing: Tips for Post-Conference Follow-Up and Networking
Helen Eby and Jamie Hartz
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

We want to hear your thoughts on the Buddies and Newbies activities at this year's conference. In addition to evaluating the usefulness of this new program, participants will receive tips on how to continue the networking experience after the conference. What do you do with all of those business cards you collected, and how do you follow up with potential contacts? The speakers will introduce attendees to other sources of potential contact with colleagues, such as through ATA's divisions, listservs, and local chapters. Participants will also be invited to suggest ways in which this program can be improved. To learn about all the events in this series, CLICK HERE.


ATA Activities
Related Sessions

J-4 Japanese<>English Certification Workshop

S-7 Preparing for ATA's English>Spanish Certification Exam, Part I

S-13 Preparing for ATA's English>Spanish Certification Exam, Part II

 
 
Financial T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

FIN-1 CMBS, RMBS, and ABS of CDO: Some Insights into the "Alphabet Soup"
Ralf Lemster
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Financial translators are often confronted with "trader-speak" that needs to be deciphered and transformed into language target readers can actually understand. The speaker will examine a number of acronyms and similar concepts commonly used in the context of structured investment products, securitizations, and similar structures.


FIN-2 Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act: The Long Arm of the Law
Lorena Pike
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), enacted in March 2010, intends to prevent tax fraud by U.S. citizens and residents who hold bank accounts in foreign countries. It also applies to foreign entities that have investments in the U.S. This entails a change in reporting and withholding practices that will affect financial institutions, individuals, and corporations worldwide. This session will describe FATCA, its requirements, enforcement, and the countries with which the IRS has signed an agreement. Attendees will also learn about the most common terms encountered in FATCA agreements that are already in place.


FIN-3 Credit Derivatives: Key Concepts, Applications, and Terminology
Ralf Lemster
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Credit derivatives have been at the forefront of discussions surrounding the financial crisis—Warren Buffett even called them "financial weapons of mass destruction." Whatever your fundamental views, these instruments are now established firmly in financial texts. Credit derivatives pose numerous challenges for financial translators, such as terminology that is complex and evolving constantly. We will look at the key concepts of credit derivatives, their primary fields of application, and the main technical terms financial translators need to know.


Financial T&I
Related Sessions

SEM-F The Company They Keep: A Guide for German>English Translators

G-3 New International Financial Reporting Standards 2013: Guidance for German>English Translators

LAW-2 Language of the Law: Tips for Translators of Legal Documents

LAW-11 Arbitration: Terminology, Sources, and Problems

S-11 Dealing with IFRS Terminology When Translating Audited Financial Statements into Spanish

S-14 Translating Financial Analysis (Spanish>English)

SL-6 Translating Administrative Documents Between English and Polish

 
 
Interpreting
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

I-1 The Dos and Taboos of Conference Interpreting and Why You Should Heed Them
Yuliya Tsaplina
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The world of conference interpreting has both clear-cut standards and implicit rules. Topics will include equipment standards and team composition, the "unwritten rules" of behavior in the booth and interpreter etiquette, and what to look for in a contract. This session is intended for recent graduates of interpreting schools, interpreters with experience in other settings (e.g., judicial interpreting), conference organizers, and agencies.


I-2 Best Practices When Interpreting for Children
Fabio Torres
(Thursday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Interpreters who continue to develop their interpreting skills will have an invaluable tool when faced with assignments involving interpreting for children. This session will explore the cognitive differences between children and adults during the interpreting encounter. Attendees will learn how to build trust with children. Attendees will also investigate best practices for facilitating the interpreting session.


I-3 How May I Help You?
Erin Rosales and Rashelle LeCaptain
(Thursday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

How interpreters interact with the people around them influences their ability to facilitate effective communication. Good customer service demonstrates professionalism and drives client support for interpreters and their services. In this session, attendees will gain practical customer service skills for on-the-job application, with special focus given to health care interpreting. Attendees will also receive resources for improving their customer service strategies.


I-4 CANCELLED
The Multiple Roles of Interpreters at the Nuremberg Trials
Nancy Schweda Nicholson
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




I-5 Origin and Challenges of Simultaneous Interpreting: The Nuremberg Experience, Part I
Siegfried Ramler
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

This session will deal with the practice of simultaneous interpreting at the Nuremberg trials. Consecutive interpreting in the four working languages (German, English, French, and Russian) at the international trial would have been laborious and inefficient. A new method had to be found to deal with the challenges of making the proceedings accessible not only to everyone in the courtroom, but through the media to the world beyond the trial venue. The speaker, one of the few surviving members of the Nuremberg interpreting team, will present examples of the particular language challenges encountered when employing this breakthrough method of interpreting at the trials, including overcoming both human and technical obstacles.


I-6 Origin and Challenges of Simultaneous Interpreting: The Nuremberg Experience, Part II
Siegfried Ramler
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

See abstract for "I-5: Origin and Challenges of Simultaneous Interpreting: The Nuremberg Experience, Part I."


I-7 New Frontiers in Simultaneous (Tele)Interpreting
Hayley Goodstein
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) U.S. Section recently implemented the ZipDX multilingual teleconferencing system with simultaneous interpreting technology. This system has streamlined interaction between IBWC’s U.S. and Mexican Sections and increased engagement with external stakeholders. The speaker will discuss the professional and technical challenges and successes encountered by IBWC’s language specialists when implementing this solution. The speaker will also detail how this technology could be used in other interpreting scenarios.


I-8 The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Online Training for Interpreters
Marjory Bancroft
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Find out how online interpreter training protects you from liability, enhances your status, and differentiates you from the competition. Come learn what types of training are available (e.g., distance learning, e-learning, hybrid programs), how to identify good training, and which programs are available (more than you think!). With a focus on medical and legal interpreting, attendees will explore the world of interpreter training online.


I-9 Enhancing Short-Term Memory for Accurate Interpreting
Roda Roberts
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Short-term memory (STM), also referred to as working memory, plays a very important role in both consecutive and simultaneous interpreting. It is a major factor responsible for the production of accurate and complete interpreting. After analyzing how STM functions in the two main modes of interpreting, the speaker will discuss methods for improving STM.


I-10 How to Conduct a Webinar-Supported Multilingual Teleconference
Nao Otsuka
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

A teleconference among multiple language speakers with their interpreters can be lengthy, distractive, unproductive, and daunting for everyone involved. The speaker will provide an overview of how to conduct a multi-language teleconference smoothly and effectively using a webinar system and conference call lines. Attendees will learn from actual examples and gain practical knowledge on how to organize or provide interpreting services for a multi-language teleconference, including required equipment and procedures.


I-11 The Neuroscience of the Triadic Encounter: Paralinguistic Elements Meet Synapses
Juan Felipe Gutierrez Sanín
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Body language has been known to be a powerful communication conveyor. Some researchers claim that as much as 70% of all human communication is nonverbal or paralinguistic. Recent research suggests that most, if not all, of these nonverbal interactions are carried out via our facial expressions, body posture, and eye movements. Human beings are amazingly equipped to communicate very complex and nuanced emotional cues before they have uttered a syllable. This session will examine the subtle ways we express, or give away, our emotions and beliefs through nonverbal communication.


I-12 A Successful Transition from Translator to Interpreter
Christopher Dimmick
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will explore how translators can broaden their current skills to branch out into the interpreting field. The common challenges and pitfalls of interpreting will be explored. Attendees will participate in interactive interpreting exercises designed to gauge their own strengths and to discover what skills need to be developed to meet the challenges interpreters face. Attendees will become more familiar with the professional development opportunities that are available to help them transition successfully from translation to interpreting work.


I-13 Best Practices for Interpreter Self-Care
Fabio Torres
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Interpreters often feel vicarious stress when interpreting for patients and clients who have experienced devastating illness, trauma, and abuse. As a result, interpreters must learn to practice basic techniques of self-care. This session will teach attendees how interpreters need to "decompress" and deal with the emotional issues that can come from being exposed to too much tragedy during interpreting encounters.


I-14 Focus on Words: The Death of Reliable Interpreting
Harry Obst
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm to Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am

All bilingual and multilingual persons are in love with words, both spoken and written. They have many thousands from different languages stored in their brains and computers. However, in interpreting, a preoccupation with the words just heard can be distracting and even destructive. Keeping your distance from those words-sometimes even ignoring them completely-makes for much more reliable interpreting. Quickly getting to the meaning and the message requires techniques that push the words away and out of the interpreter's notes.


I-15 NEW SESSION
I Am Invisible, I Am a Phone Interpreter, and Love It
Lourdes Pumarejo
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

The speaker will provide an overview of telephonic interpreting. Topics will include the requirements and technology involved, how to handle stress, and the dos and don'ts of telephonic interpreting. This session is intended for Spanish<>English speakers.


Interpreting
Related Sessions

SEM-A Extreme Interpreting: Strategies and Techniques for Interpreting Trauma

LSC-2 Managing Interpreting Projects: When Only Extreme Project Management Will Do

MED-9 Understanding U.S. Health Professions to Avoid Common Translation and Interpreting Errors

P-3 It's Not Just What You Say, but How You Say It!

S-9 Music and Meaning for Interpreters

 
 
Independent Contractors
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

IC-1 Feast and Famine for Freelance Translators
Catherine Christaki
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Freelance translators are well aware of the feast or famine phenomenon. Work is never steady—one month you are snowed under an avalanche of projects and the next you are sitting in front of your computer wondering when (or where) the next project will come. The speaker will provide tips on how to handle both feast and famine cycles, highlighting ways to avoid and/or get through them unharmed and how to turn them into positive experiences career-wise.


IC-2 Ensuring Payment Before, During, and After the Project
Ted Wozniak
(Thursday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Late and non-payments are a fact of life in all businesses. The Internet and the rise of translator "auction" portals, while increasing the translator's exposure to the global market, have also made it easier for unscrupulous people to delay payment or even intentionally defraud freelancers. This session will cover the steps that all translators can and should take to minimize the risk of not being paid for their services. Topics will include actions to take before, during, and after the project, standard business practices regarding accounts payable, and resources for checking a company's bone fides, dunning, and collection procedures.


IC-3 Time Management for Freelancers: How to Get Things Done!
Corinne McKay and David Rumsey
(Thursday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Poor time management is a major pitfall for many freelancers. Without a system for scheduling and prioritizing, we can end up earning less than we want or need, feeling that we have no free time, and suffering significant stress in our work and personal lives. In this session, we will examine concrete ways to organize the day, prioritize what matters, and tame the beasts of modern life such as e-mail and smartphones. We will also look at case studies of how successful freelancers manage their time.


IC-4 How I Use the ASTM Standards to Develop a Team Approach with My Clients
Helen Eby
(Thursday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Even though the ASTM standards do NOT cover linguistic issues, they do address many other issues that are part of the translation process. This makes them tremendously useful in framing a productive conversation with direct clients. The speaker will discuss how she incorporated the ASTM standards when developing a form for use in initial conversations with clients and how it has led to productive teamwork.


IC-5 10 Essential Principles to Growing Your Language Business
Marcela Reyes
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

As you think about your approach to increasing your client base, growing your language business, making your name known, and having an effective strategy in the current economy, you need to apply 10 essential principles to creating a sustainable, profitable, and ultimately successful business. Some of the things you will learn during this session include how to develop a solid and distinctive brand, advance your business through social media, and how to build the reputation of your business to separate it from the competition.


IC-6 Assertive, Not Aggressive: Dealing with Conflict
Judy Jenner
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

At some point in their careers, both translators and interpreters will have to deal with conflict. It could be an unsatisfied client, a deponent who claims the interpreter did not interpret a statement accurately, an attorney who insists the interpreter has a conflict of interest, a client who does not want to pay, or any number of issues. Conflict is a normal, yet stressful, part of running a small business. Using the basics of conflict resolution, the speaker will suggest ways to resolve tricky situations successfully. Examples will be drawn from the speaker’s own practice.


IC-7 Social Media for Translators
Catherine Christaki
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Translator and interpreter communities on social media have been growing rapidly in the past few years. This session will provide an overview of the three most commonly used social networks (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) and offer tips on how they can be used for enhancing a linguist’s online presence. The main topics covered will be the basics of a good profile, what to share and where to find content, how to use social media for business, whom to follow, and the most common mistakes made by users. The session will close with a question-and-answer segment.


IC-8 How to Use Social Media and Blogging to Find New Clients
Catherine Christaki
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Translators are constantly told that in order to find direct clients they need a website, a blog, and a powerful social media presence. Then what? Finding potential clients using the power of the web is a personalized process toward matching each translator with the desired client. This session will explore tools and ideas to generate leads and approach potential clients using blogging and social networks such as Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.


IC-9 Win-Win: How to Set a Fair Price for Your Work
Jonathan Hine
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translators and interpreters are in business. Pricing and monitoring financial performance are crucial to business success. This session will cover the elements of budgeting and business planning. The methodology will help attendees develop personal criteria for accepting or rejecting freelance assignments, balancing employment offers, and choosing alternatives for business expansion. Attendees will also learn about calculating the break-even price and tracking sales volume and revenue. Topics will also include evaluating life-changing moves, selling quality to clients, building operating reserves, and surviving business cycles.


IC-10 Setting Freelance Translation Rates in a Technologically Changing Market
Andrew Levine
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

How well are you keeping up with the pace of change? Freelance translators used to freely raise their rates over time, but a survey published last year shows that translation rates have steadily fallen since the financial crisis. Downward pressure on costs is being exerted by the emergence of new technologies aimed at increasing productivity. This session will help freelancers establish rates when working with machine translation (post-editing), voice recognition software and auto-text input in computer-assisted translation tool environments, and with other tools that are gaining in popularity to squeeze the most work from each hour.


IC-11 Investigative Negotiation: The Art of Asking Why
Jeana Clark
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Even the most savvy business owners frequently leave unclaimed value on the negotiation table. Investigative negotiation goes beyond the primal fight or flight response or the traditional win-win approach. Language professionals understand that translation is an art form requiring research skills and creativity, just as negotiators fully understand the importance of preparation and thinking outside the box. However, the research prowess and creativity utilized in investigative negotiation is on par with that used in transcreation. This session will offer practical information for language professionals who want to hone their investigative negotiation skills.


IC-12 Security Clearances: A Gateway to Opportunity
Virginia Hinders and Alair Fritz
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Having a security clearance can open doors to many new clients and types of work for linguists in all fields, but what exactly is a security clearance? How can a linguist go about getting one? What level is "high enough" for various types of work? The speakers will explain the differences in security clearance levels, the steps that may be involved in obtaining a security clearance, the barriers that can arise during investigation for clearances, the types of job opportunities that require security clearances, and, most importantly, what a security clearance can mean in today's competitive marketplace.


IC-13 Onsite Contract Work: Tips and Traps
Natalia Eklund
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Onsite contract work is one aspect of our profession that is often overlooked and underestimated. You are neither an employee nor a freelancer working from home. The speaker will discuss the tips and traps you need to be aware of when working onsite. Topics will cover integrating an onsite team successfully, adapting to various managers or coordinators, and mentally positioning yourself as a neutral yet independent service provider.


Independent Contractors
Related Sessions

SEM-E Creating Your Digital Portfolio: A Practical Workshop

SEM-K Management Accounting for Freelancers: You Gotta Do It

LSC-6 Delegating: The Beginning of a Great Outcome

LSC-7 Juggling Clients, Employees, and Linguists: A Business Owner's Perspective

LSC-10 The Dynamics of Negotiation

 
 
Literary Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

L-1 CANCELLED
Turkish Children's Literature: Teaching Contemporary Values through Traditional Tales
Louis Mitler
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




L-2 Death (and Rebirth) in Venice: Nine English Translations of Thomas Mann's Novella
Jeffrey Buntrock, Geoffrey Koby, and Sarah Koby
(Thursday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speakers will examine all nine of the German>English translations of Death in Venice by Thomas Mann. Seven of these were published in the past 25 years, and the two oldest translations come across as flat and uninspired to today's reader. The speakers will also discuss how the cultural background has changed since the novella was first published in 1913. Evident strategies of the translators will also be addressed. Topics will include the translators' faithfulness to the source text, the treatment of homoerotic passages, and how the characters of Aschenbach and Tadzio are portrayed in each translation.


L-3 Translators and Self-Published Authors: A Partnership for the New Digital Publishing Age
Rafa Lombardino
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

We are witnessing a paradigm shift in the publishing industry. An increasing number of authors are now making their work available to readers through online and print-on-demand platforms, cutting out the publisher as the middleman. The most ambitious among these authors have turned to translators to help them expand their readership across borders, languages, and cultures. This speaker will discuss her own experiences helping self-published authors make their books available to foreign markets. Attendees will learn about making initial contact with authors, the negotiation process, marketing assistance, language awareness, and the efforts to build an audience.


L-4 Translating Dialect Literature
Luigi Bonaffini, Gaetano Cipolla, John DuVal, Florence Russo, and Joseph Perricone
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The session will discuss the specific problems encountered in translating dialect literature and the various strategies that can be adopted to resolve them. Special focus will be given to Italian dialect literature, including poetry.


L-5 Contemporary Brazilian Short Stories: Translating Authors from Brazil into English and Spanish
Rafa Lombardino
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Contemporary Brazilian Short Stories website is a literary translation effort created in 2011 to promote Brazilian literature in English. In 2013, a sister site, Cuentos Brasileños de la Actualidad, was created to publish the same content in Spanish. Attendees will learn more about the project and see examples of short stories that have presented some challenges. Topics will include how to accommodate for a variety of subjects and styles from authors coming from different parts of the country, as well as how to convey all of the color and flavor of the Portuguese spoken in Brazil.


L-6 Exporting Spanish Culture through Theater Translation
Jorge Braga
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Hispanic drama in English translation is currently enjoying a period of great popularity thanks to the production of actable versions, both in Britain and America. Can translators guarantee the comprehension and acceptability of Spanish drama in English while offering a particular vision of Spain and its culture? To help answer this question, the speaker will analyze a collection of contemporary translated Spanish works. Specific focus will be given to goals, register, and treatment of recurrent topics.


L-7 Making the Leap from Legal and Commercial Translations to Literary Translation
Marianne Reiner
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The speaker will discuss how she was able to spice up a legal and commercial translation business by taking on some challenging literary translation projects. Topic will include how to approach publishers, how to build experience, the harsh reality of the cost of literary translation, and how to find the right balance between the projects you need to make a living and the projects on which you dream of working. Examples will be provided from the speaker’s latest published literary translation of Mary Johnson’s An Unquenchable Thirst into French (Une quête infinite).


L-8 10 Tips for Aspiring Literary Translators
Lisa Carter
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The speaker will share the top 10 insights, epiphanies, and attitude adjustments that helped her become a successful literary translator. Tips will address the actual work of creative translation and navigating the publishing industry. An interactive question-and-answer period will follow, so bring your doubts to ask a veteran. Learn the secrets and specifics that will allow you to take the next steps toward your own successful career in literary translation.


L-9 CANCELLED
Open Discussion on Translating Formally Structured Poetry
Lydia Razran Stone and Vladimir Kovner
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




L-10 Intuition in Literary Translation
Severine Hubscher-Davidson
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Intuition is often said to be a necessary component of literary translation. As translators, we must capture implied meanings in a text and figure out how to transfer these effectively for a different audience. But what is the role of intuition in this process, and how can translators learn to use it to their advantage? In this session, we will examine how intuitions manifest themselves when translating into English. We will also address ways to determine when such intuitions should be trusted and when they should be avoided. Attendees will be provided with many examples in English of both successful and unsuccessful intuitive translations.


L-11 CANCELLED
Working with Authors: Help or Hindrance?
Inga Michaeli
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




L-12 NEW SESSION
Feminist Lexis in English Translations of Women's Writing in Urdu
Sami Rafiq
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

There have been several women writers in Urdu who have expressed feminist concerns regarding the exploitation of Muslim women in a patriarchal society. These writers have also depicted female consciousness, angst, and aspirations through a distinct feminist vocabulary. A close reading of the translations of the works of Qurratulain Hyder, Ismat Chughtai, and Rashid Jahan can provide some surprising insights on how feminist vocabulary is created across languages and cultures.


Literary Translation
Related Sessions

SEM-C Literary Translation Workshop

SEM-I Master Class in Spanish>English Literary Translation

F-2 The Reader Over Your Shoulder

IT-1 Andrea Camilleri's English Voice: Translating Montalbano's Novels from Sicilian

IT-2 Rhyme and Reasoning: The Joys and Challenges of Translating Poetry, Part I

IT-3 Rhyme and Reasoning: The Joys and Challenges of Translating Poetry, Part II

P-4 Make Hay while the Pun Shines: Demystifying Pun Translation

P-5 A Feat of Olympic Proportions: Translating Rio's Literary Voices into English

P-6 The Cow Went to the Swamp: Idioms and Metaphors in Translation

 
 
Legal T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LAW-1 CANCELLED
Mexican Appellate Court Decision: General Lessons for the Spanish>English Legal Translator
Aaron Ruby
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




LAW-2 Language of the Law: Tips for Translators of Legal Documents
Hadassah Weiner
(Thursday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

This session will highlight the challenges involved in translating legal documents into U.S. English. Topics will include the differences in legal systems and structures, as well as standard legal terms that might not have precise equivalents in the target language. Whether you are translating from or into English, this session should help you recognize "unique" aspects of the U.S. legal system, identify potential pitfalls, and increase your comfort level when dealing with recurring words and phrases. Financial translators who encounter legal documents and terminology in their work will also benefit from this session.


LAW-3 Revisiting Standards of Care and Liability for Legal Translations
Thomas Mann
(Thursday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will examine how translators could be held liable for the poor translation of legal documents and explore what they can do to protect themselves against such liability. Using a hypothetical case, the speaker will discuss some basic legal grounds and standards that could be applied to determine translator liability.


LAW-4 Forms of Relief in Immigration Law and the Role of Translation in the Immigration Process
Olga Shostachuk
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

All of the documents filed with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services must be presented in English, so translation plays a pivotal role. Translating these documents requires both an understanding of the process and specific subject matter expertise. The speaker will provide an overview of immigration proceedings—including interviews, court hearings, and appeals—in order to explain the removal process and the forms of relief from removal. The document translation and transcription involved in the process will also be discussed. A list of resources in English and Russian will be provided.


LAW-5 Custody, Visitation, Support and Domestic Violence: An Overview for Court Interpreters
Jennifer De La Cruz
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

This session will provide an overview of some of the most common themes discussed in a court of family law. By comparing family codes in the U.S. and Mexico, attendees will learn how the law defines the family unit, how the courts intervene when this unit has become divided, and some of the complexities of self-represented litigant hearings. The speaker will also explore the ethical and personal challenges that can stem from interpreting in highly emotional situations. Language-specific vocabulary and resources will be provided.


LAW-6 Culture Clashes in Legal Translation and Interpreting
Luciana Carvalho
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will explore culture clashes in legal translation and interpreting. The speaker will discuss how legal culture affects legal translation and legal interpreting by examining the culture-specific features of common law and civil law traditions. Through actual examples, the speaker will identify and discuss situations in which culture clashes are likely to occur. The speaker will also discuss the role legal interpreters and translators play when dealing with—and avoiding—culture clashes.


LAW-7 CANCELLED
Tape Transcription and Translation in the Pre-Custodial and Custodial Settings
Jaime Fatas
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)




LAW-8 CANCELLED
Interpreter Error: Cause for Appeal?
Grecia St. John-Carver
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English with Spanish examples )




LAW-9 Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts, Part I
Alfonso Villaseñor
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

This session will examine the numerous issues associated with interpreting slang and taboo expressions from Mexican Spanish into English in a courtroom setting. The complexity and occasional raw nature of this type of language can pose technical challenges for court interpreters that extend far beyond the mere understanding of terminology. The speaker will encourage participants to venture outside their comfort zone and recognize the importance of achieving adequate proficiency in the lower registers of both languages.


LAW-10 Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts, Part II
Alfonso Villaseñor
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

See abstract for "LAW-9: Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts, Part I."


LAW-11 Arbitration: Terminology, Sources, and Problems
David Kendall
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

What is the purpose of arbitration? The speaker will discuss the English terminology associated with each stage of the arbitration process, from the request for arbitration to the award. Particular attention will be paid to alternative bodies of terminology and on finding reliable sources of terminology. The distinctions between arbitration terminology and general legal terminology will also be covered. This session is intended for legal and financial translators with some experience translating arbitration-related texts.


Legal T&I
Related Sessions

SEM-B Lifecycle of a Contract: Common Challenges and Hands-On Training

SEM-D Mexican Civil Procedure for Spanish>English Translators

SEM-J Transcription/Translation of Forensic Recordings: Procedures, Protocols, and Ethics

C-3 Handle with Care: Practical Considerations for Using the New Machine Translations of Chinese Patents

F-6 Haitian Adoptions for U.S. Couples: Multitasking and Exploring Historical Context, Social Problems, and Legal Issues

G-2 Managing German or American Lawyer Expectations on Legal Translations

I-4 The Multiple Roles of Interpreters at the Nuremberg Trials

I-5 Origin and Challenges of Simultaneous Interpreting: The Nuremberg Experience, Part I

I-6 Origin and Challenges of Simultaneous Interpreting: The Nuremberg Experience, Part II

I-8 The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Online Training for Interpreters

IT-4 Cognates and False Cognates in Italian Legal Translations

K-2 Korean>English Patent Translation: Fundamentals and Current Guidelines

K-3 Legal Interpreting: Certification and Beyond

L-7 Making the Leap from Legal and Commercial Translations to Literary Translation

LT-9 Practical Applications of Digital Recording, Voice Recognition, OCR Scanners, and Other Technologies

MEL-1 Translating Arabic Legal Text: Challenges and Solutions

S-2 Translating Court Decisions from Spanish>English

S-3 English>Spanish Legal Translation: Pitfalls and Precautions

S-8 Preparing to Interpret for a High-Profile Criminal Trial

SL-6 Translating Administrative Documents Between English and Polish

ST-8 Explosives and Bombing-Related Terminology

 
 
Language Services Companies
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LSC-1 CANCELLED
Remote Project Management
Dave Summers
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)




LSC-2 Managing Interpreting Projects: When Only Extreme Project Management Will Do
Cristina Silva
(Thursday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

What does it take to manage an interpreting project sanely and successfully? We will look at a traditional model of the Project Management Body of Knowledge, created by the Project Management Institute, in order to examine how it applies to interpreting projects. We will identify stakeholders, develop a plan of action (project charter), discuss risks in the planning phase (e.g., interpreter fatigue, faulty equipment), and address client education. How do you manage freelancers and in-house interpreting teams? How do you manage client expectations during the execution, monitoring, and controlling phases? These are just some of the topics to be discussed.


LSC-3 How to Avoid the Most Costly Mistakes in the Localization Industry
Michael Cárdenas and Derick Fajardo
(Thursday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speakers will discuss the mistakes they have observed and committed in the localization industry in the past 28 years, as well as how to avoid them. Topics will include: 1) how to recognize when the project is going into disaster mode (and how to save it), 2) making sure you have the best in tools and technology, 3) developing the best localization teams, and 4) the importance of policies and procedures. The speaker will unveil the secrets to avoiding the traps, pitfalls, quicksand, falling anvils, and other hazards that can befall a localizer.


LSC-4 Language Services for Unicorns and Other Creatives
Virginia Anderson
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The speaker will discuss how to provide language services to unicorns—creatives in the fields of design, entertainment, advertising, and marketing. Unicorns need special cultural consulting and magical language services to launch brands, websites, films, and marketing campaigns on an international scale. Both unicorns (creatives) and horses (regular customers) ask for translation and editing. Unicorns need services such as consulting, script translation, cultural research, and transcreation. Learn to reveal and tame the hidden needs that these enchanting creative customers do not really know how to request.


LSC-5 (Most) Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Audio and Video Production but Were Afraid to Ask
Cristina Silva
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

What do you do when your clients ask about audio and/or video production? The speaker will walk you through many multimedia projects—from pre- to post-production—from the point of view of a language services provider. Where do you find voice-over talent? What is the difference between a home and a studio recording? Do you need a voice coach and a sound engineer? How is a 30-second commercial different from voice prompts for the telephone company? What are some deliverables to your client? These are just some of the questions to be addressed during this session.


LSC-6 Delegating: The Beginning of a Great Outcome
Ines Iros
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Beginner; Presented in: English)

A common mistake is to think that our businesses would not work without our involvement in every task. Staying away from the "kitchen" and developing strategies, objectives, and metrics are essential approaches in order to get to the next level. Once we delegate, the biggest challenge is to track and monitor what we no longer do. A balance scorecard is a great measurement system that is easy to use, prepare, and communicate. It helps us make the right decisions, stay on the right path, and diagnose and align resources with our objectives.


LSC-7 Juggling Clients, Employees, and Linguists: A Business Owner's Perspective
Michael Bearden
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will focus on the everyday challenges language services providers face as they work for their clients while managing a team of project managers and support staff in a fast-paced and competitive market that requires them to all do more with less. The speaker will reveal best-practice solutions and sustainable methods to maximize efficiency without sacrificing the integrity of either the translation process or the final product. Attendees will receive tips to help them leverage their work and maximize their potential for success.


LSC-8 The Process and Benefits of EN 15038:2006 Certification
Charles Clark
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will explore the framework for translation management systems and discuss why companies would benefit from implementing the EN15038 Standard for Translation Services. The session will begin with a brief overview of the standard, exploring the benefits of external assessment as a method for objective and independent feedback to top executives. The speaker will explore the everyday occurrences of linguistic partner practices that introduce risk to clients and to an organization's reputation.


LSC-9 SaaS vs. Purchased Software: What Is It Really Worth?
Justin Rice
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

The translation and localization industry is inundated with software (e.g., computer-assisted translation tools, project management software, and accounting software). This session will examine the value of software in terms of the mechanism used to purchase it—SaaS (software as a service) or purchased license. Attendees will leave with a better idea of the true cost of software (i.e., not just the price). They will also be in a better position to determine whether or not their organization should purchase an SaaS option or the software outright.


LSC-10 NEW SESSION
The Dynamics of Negotiation
Yelena Petrova-Toolsie
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Negotiation is a common mechanism for resolving differences among language partners regarding the allocation of resources. Broadly viewed, these negotiations are social decision-making processes involving interdependent parties who do not share identical preferences, and in this way are essential elements of the business enterprise. We will explore the major concepts and theories of negotiation, as well as the dynamics of interpersonal and intergroup conflict and its resolution. Attendees will develop skills relevant to a broad range of contexts.


LSC-11 NEW SESSION
Keys to Attracting and Retaining Top Linguists
Marian S. Greenfield
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The best linguists can afford to be picky about the language services companies they work with. Based on the speaker's more than 30 years of experience as both a freelance translator and on discussions with other freelancers, this session will explore what it is that linguists look for in the LSP's they work for and what besides premium rates lands LSP's on the top of their priority client lists. If there is time, we will also discuss how some of those same characteristics make LSP's attractive to their corporate clients. The speaker hopes to spark a discussion among attendees as to how to meet and exceed the bar set by translator/interpreter favorite clients.


Language Services Companies
Related Sessions

C-1 Managing Chinese-Language Projects: Tips for Project Managers

T-6 Two Sides of a Coin: Software Localization from Both the Translator’s and Project Manager’s Perspectives

 
 
Language Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LT-1 CANCELLED
Emerging Translation Technology Companies and Services
Brian McConnell
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




LT-2 Putting an End to Childish Ways: Looking at Translation Technology through a Grown-Up Lens
Jost Zetzsche
(Thursday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

We have made huge strides in our willingness to accept what translation technology has to offer, but all too often we forget that maturity and rely on emotions rather than reason. During this overview of translation technology, the speaker will discuss some strategies for how you can personally evaluate what technology is helpful to your professional development and what you should reject.


LT-3 CANCELLED
Introduction to Human Language Technology for Translators
Michelle Vanni
(Thursday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)




LT-4 Is Machine Translation Secure?
David Canek
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Machine translation has received a lot of attention recently, and it seems that quite a few professional translators turn to it to boost their productivity. An issue that has been brought up many times but seldom analyzed systematically is security. The session will provide a sober analysis of the legal, technical, and practical aspects of security in relation to machine translation. Attendees will gain an understanding of when machine translation can be used safely and when it is better to avoid it.


LT-5 Dealing with Tags
Tuomas Kostiainen
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The move from Word as the translation environment to computer-assisted translation (CAT) tool-specific environments (e.g., Trados Studio and memoQ) has created a new problem for many translators: tags. What are they, where do they come from, and do we really need them? This session will answer those questions and show how to deal with tags during translation, as well as how to avoid them in the first place by using proper settings or external tag-cleaning tools such as CodeZapper. Studio, memoQ, and Wordfast will be used during this session, but the information will be useful for users of other tools.


LT-6 Useful Technologies for the Mobile Translator and Interpreter
Huilin Gao
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will review useful and money-saving techniques and technologies for translators and interpreters, such as portable Wi-Fi products, legal repeaters, voice-over Internet protocol, and solutions for router set-up. The speaker will also provide some useful reference websites for translation and interpreting and review easy and inexpensive website development sites to promote personal businesses. The speaker will also demonstrate devices and technics that will enhance translator and interpreter mobility, such as cloud storage services and web-based printing.


LT-7 Six Things to Make You a Better Trados Studio User
Tuomas Kostiainen
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

It is easy for translators to get lost in the jungle of functions and settings offered by modern computer-assisted translation tools. However, if users cannot find the efficiency-enhancing features and do not know how to fine-tune them, they lose the major benefits these tools offer. This session will concentrate on six Trados Studio functions that many translators frequently do not use to their fullest extent or have difficulty using correctly: 1) global and project settings, 2) translation memory usage (such as number of memories and their search settings), 3) AutoSuggest, 4) display filter, 5) verification and quality assurance, and 6) termbases.


LT-8 Speech Translation: Fully Automated, or the Human in the Loop?
Hassan Sawaf
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The use of machine translation is finally becoming more mainstream. Is the next step automated speech translation? What challenges does speech input present? Can speech translation ever be trusted? If so, where? Where does the human fit into the process? Samples of real scenarios will be presented.


LT-9 CANCELLED
Practical Applications of Digital Recording, Voice Recognition, OCR Scanners, and Other Technologies
Jaime Fatas
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




LT-10 NEW SESSION
Machine Translation Demystified
Jay Marciano
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm to Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am

Machine translation attempts to perform a fundamentally human task: rendering a sentence from one language into another. Whether you consider machine translation friend or foe, every translator should have a basic understanding of what it is and how it works. This session turns the tables on machine translation by providing a very human explanation of how such a system is built and how it creates a translation of a sentence it has never before encountered. Attendees will gain an understanding of machine translation's strengths and weaknesses and see how it can be used effectively in appropriate projects.


LT-11 NEW SESSION
Business Case: Implementation of Systran 7 Premium Translator
Paulo Camargo
(Thursday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The recent developments in machine translation (MT) technology will shape translation processes forever. The speaker will discuss how an entry-level MT engine can benefit freelance translators and translation companies. Terminology management is also an essential step that improves quality, since it identifies the terminology beforehand. The speaker will discuss how using this terminology to pre-translate files allows generalist translators to translate complex content at higher productivity.


LT-12 NEW SESSION
A Translator's Guide to Computers and Information Technology
Lorena Pike
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session will provide translators with a guide on how and where to find software and hardware that will help them streamline their translation process to ensure quality and productivity. It will include information on PDF readers and converters, optical character recognition software, desktop publishing software, remote access, word count applications, indexers, and corpora databases. It will not include specific information on computer-assisted translation software, but a wider overview of computers and information technology every translator should now.


Language Technology
Related Sessions

C-3 Handle with Care: Practical Considerations for Using the New Machine Translations of Chinese Patents

J-2 Finding the Right Japanese<>English CAT Tool

K-4 Tool Kits and Technical Tips for Korean Translators

LSC-9 SaaS vs. Purchased Software: What Is It Really Worth?

SL-5 A CAT Breed for the Slavic Soul

T-9 Two Important New Translation Standards: TIPP and XLIFF:doc

 
 
Medical T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

MED-1 Training and Ethical Challenges in Health Care Interpreting
Carol Velandia and Minilla Malhotra
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

This session will highlight successful training tools related to real-world clinical encounters in health care institutions. Emphasis will be placed on developing competency skills and compliance with ethical and professional protocols leading to effective communication among patients, health care providers, and medical interpreters. This session will focus on the issues and challenges relevant to the dynamics of rendering accurate and culturally sensitive communication. Attendees will participate in a role-playing segment and discussion group, incorporating key lessons learned throughout the session.


MED-2 A Home for Trainers: An Initiative of the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care
Esther Diaz
(Thursday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The National Standards for Healthcare Interpreter Training Programs were released by the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care in 2011. The standards provide guidance for trainers, curriculum developers, interpreters, and purchasers of interpreter services about what content, methodologies, and administrative structures should be used to prepare interpreters for work in this field. The speaker will discuss the final version of the National Standards for Healthcare Interpreter Training Programs and identify the areas of the standards that have required many programs to expand. The specific projects that support this growth, along with the lessons learned, will also be discussed.


MED-3 Software Localization in the Medical Device Industry: What's Happening Behind the Scenes
Marita Hoeh and Karen Nicoulin
(Thursday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

What does software localization in the medical device industry involve? The speaker will discuss how software localization teams, English-language content development teams, and software development teams collaborate to produce a final product ready to market. Aspects of project management will also be discussed. The speaker will outline the benefits of this collaboration, which can help reduce localization costs and accelerate the overall timeline of the project.


MED-4 Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology: Strategies for Learning the Terminology and Preparing for National Medical Interpreter/Translator Certification Exams
Jaime Fatas
(Thursday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

Due the massive scope and complexity of anatomy, physiology, and pathology, strategic planning and study are fundamental in order to develop a conceptual understanding and lexical command of the related terminology. The speaker will discuss strategies to develop a comprehensive study plan for people who want to become medical translators and interpreters, to develop/improve their medical terminology/interpreting skills, and to prepare for the new national certification exams.


MED-5 CANCELLED
English>Spanish Medical Translation in 2013: Almost Everything Remains to Be Done
Pablo Mugüerza
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




MED-6 Start and End of Life: Pediatrics and Geriatrics
Harry Sasson
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

The speaker will analyze the similarities between pediatrics and geriatrics. By sharing actual experiences, the speaker will explore how working in the hospital setting affects interpreters. Attendees will also learn about two subjects that are seldom taught to interpreters: 1) how to deal with end-of-life situations, and 2) how to interpret prayer into Spanish. The objective is to prepare medical interpreters for the unexpected.


MED-7 Medical Interpreting at a Level I Trauma Center
Alvaro Vergara-Mery
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

In this session, attendees will learn the full meaning of interpreting in a trauma center. Interpreting trauma implies knowledge of advanced medical terminology, as well as having the energy and skills tailored to the stressful situations that a trauma call involves. Attendees will learn about the different kinds of trauma, ways to cope with the "trauma pace," and how to make these encounters more successful. We will cover different strategies that medical interpreters need to follow to have a less stressful outcome. Actual cases will be presented for study and group exercises will allow for further exploration of interpreting at a Level I trauma center.


MED-8 Assisting Researchers in the Translation and Submission of a Manuscript for Publication
Sergio Lozano
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Presenting the results of biomedical research in an English-language journal is an important task for a researcher. Some researchers, especially beginners, do not know how to prepare and submit a manuscript to a peer-reviewed journal and do not have the necessary language skills. A research translator should be able to translate and prepare a manuscript for publication and provide help during the review process to avoid unnecessary delays and errors. This session will describe manuscript preparation and the publication process for translators working with researchers.


MED-9 Understanding U.S. Health Professions to Avoid Common Translation and Interpreting Errors
Michelle Scott
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

With over 15 years of experience managing linguists for numerous languages, we have found that even veteran and/or certified translators and medical interpreters commonly use incorrect translations for U.S.-based health care providers. This session will provide descriptions of the education and roles of health professionals, including terminology for which no equivalents exist in other countries. Linguists can learn to avoid false cognates and other congruency errors by understanding nuanced terms, including "physician assistant" vs. "medical assistant," "registered" vs. "licensed," and "practitioner." The content will be relevant for translators and interpreters, whether novice or advanced.


MED-10 The Art of Saying No
Heather Barclay
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am to Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Studying and memorizing codes of ethics takes practice and skill; being able to adapt and enforce the code of ethics is an art. This is especially true of medical interpreters, as the nature of the job is often unpredictable and rarely fits the examples given in books, by colleagues, and during seminars. In the world of medicine, interpreters are often asked to perform duties that are outside their traditional role. In this session, attendees will learn how to set boundaries-and maintain them professionally-by saying "no."


MED-11 CANCELLED
Translating and Interpreting Challenges in the Field of Space Medicine
Anna A. Royer
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




MED-12 CANCELLED
Promising Practices for Patient-Centered Communication with Vulnerable Populations
Cristina Krasny
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




MED-13 Who Am I and What Am I Doing Here? Medical Interpreters and Professional Identity
Elena Langdon Fortier
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

A large push toward the professionalization of medical interpreters is taking place in the U.S., as evidenced, among other things, by the recent efforts to create national certification for interpreters, standards of practice for trainers, and accreditation for training programs. Curious about how this was affecting the self-identity of interpreters "on the ground," the speaker conducted interviews with seasoned and novice medical interpreters in Massachusetts, both freelance and staff, to gauge their level of awareness and understanding of professionalization and their role in it. The speaker will discuss her thoughts and conclusions about the present and future of this exciting field.


MED-14 NEW SESSION
Nurse, I Want My F****** Pills Now! Interpreting Profanity in Health Care
Alvaro Vergara-Mery
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Beginner; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

By understanding the meaning, context, intonation, and cultural differences and nuances, as well as other implications of insulting, embarrassing, and profane language, interpreters will be able to render more accurate equivalents without distorting, embellishing, or changing the original meaning. This session will invite attendees to participate in various interpreting scenarios (Spanish<>English) taken from actual encounters in the medical setting.


Medical T&I
Related Sessions

SEM-G Medical Terminology Workshop for Interpreters

I-8 The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Online Training for Interpreters

S-12 ¿Sin vergüenza o sinvergüenza? (Shameless or Shameful?)

ST-6 Time for a New Hip?

ST-7 Basics of Virology

 
 
Science & Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ST-1 Problems, Solutions, and Precipitates: Translating for the Pharmaceutical, Chemical, and Cosmetics Industries
Karen Tkaczyk
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Quality assurance systems and regulatory requirements often drive translation needs in the chemical industry. Translations in this area include standard operating procedures, quality assurance checklists, validation and qualification procedures, and test forms for use in laboratories and manufacturing plants. Through the use of specific examples, the speaker will explain the types of documents that form the backbone of a technical translation practice in this field. The areas that frequently cause problems during translation will also be discussed. Interaction and questions will be welcomed. This session is geared toward technical translators who already do some chemical work and wish to improve their understanding of the subject matter.


ST-2 Action-Packed Tour of a Modern Offshore Drilling Operation
John Moffitt
(Thursday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will discuss the types of hardware designed for use on modern oil exploration rigs, from the crown to the sub-sea. Attendees will learn about the variety and sizes of large steel robots that now do much of the heavy lifting on modern drilling rigs. Development and application will also be discussed. Questions will be encouraged.


ST-3 Offshore Oil and Gas Technology
Steven Marzuola
(Thursday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will provide an introduction to offshore oil and gas exploration and production. The discussion will include descriptions of the major technological developments that enable the production of oil and gas from deep-water fields and the technical challenges that must be overcome. The session will also focus on historical trends in the industry and on the future importance of hydrocarbons in the world energy market.


ST-4 Earth Extinction Events: History and Future
John Moffitt
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Let’s take a look at the very big picture of Earth's past three orbits around the Milky Way—and even go a bit into the future. Many are familiar with the theories associated with Earth's most recent extinction events, but few are aware that the planet's past is filled with a far more complex pattern of extinction events and probabilities. The speaker, a geologist and astrophysicist, will examine paleogeography and astrophysics in the context of our complex solar system. Learn how life on Earth has been significantly affected by the geometry and violence in a very crowded solar neighborhood.


ST-5 Achieving a Synthesis: How Scientific/Technical Translation Resembles and Differs from Organic Chemical Synthesis
Matthew Schlecht
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Both organic synthesis in chemistry and the technical translation field employ processes for assembling components into a defined whole. Both require years of experience and training. Organic synthesis is represented by a universal symbolism that is mutually intelligible to chemists who do not share a common language. Commonalities across languages exist for scientific and technical translation that are absent in other areas of translation. This session will cover multiple languages and examine how these processes are similar, yet different. Can the areas of scientific/technical translation and organic chemical synthesis learn valuable lessons from each other?


ST-6 Time for a New Hip?
Joanne Archambault
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Many surgeons consider total hip joint replacement to be the greatest surgical advance in the second half of the 20th century. Translating documents related to orthopedic implants requires knowledge of medicine (anatomy, surgery, etc.) and engineering concepts. The speaker will review various types of hip implants, including how they are manufactured and implanted into a patient. Key terms and primary research strategies will be discussed using examples in French and English. The information provided will be useful to translators working on medical reports, legal claims, marketing material, regulatory filings, and clinical research articles involving the hip.


ST-7 Basics of Virology
Tapani Ronni
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session will provide an introduction to virology. What are viruses and how are they different from other microbes? Can viruses even be considered alive? How come antibiotics do not work against viral infections? Using influenza and AIDS as case studies, antiviral drugs and antiviral immunity will be reviewed briefly. New tools, including viral vectors for gene therapy, will also be discussed. This session will be useful for scientific and medical translators and interpreters.


ST-8 Explosives and Bombing-Related Terminology
Christina Schoeb
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will provide an overview of English-language terminology related to bombs and explosives. Familiarity with this terminology will help translators and interpreters deal with situations involving bombing incidents and bombing-related court cases. This session will cover scientific language related to explosives chemistry, the various types of explosives, and bomb components.


ST-9 Going “All-In”
Christos Floros
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The increased demand for online gambling products in many languages has opened a very lucrative market for translators. This session will focus on some techniques for translating terminology related to gambling. Attendees will be given an overview of the various casino games and types of sports betting, tips on tackling jargon, as well as leads on where to find potential clients.


ST-10 Translating the Discourse of Architectural Design
Tamara M. Cabrera
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translating the discourse of architectural design is not an easy task. It involves understanding the design process, from concept to materialization, and the use of specific terminology to transfer complex ideas. This session will identify and address some of the main challenges associated with translating and interpreting the discourse of architectural design from English<>Spanish. In addition to exploring how contemporary architects express themselves, the speaker will examine language-specific differences in English and Spanish.


ST-11 NEW SESSION
Beautiful Translations: Foundations for the Personal Care and Cosmetics Industry
Karen Tkaczyk
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session will provide an overview of essential areas to understand in order to translate for the cosmetics, toiletries, soap, and detergent industry successfully. The speaker will introduce attendees to the regulatory affairs and key concepts behind the industry. A list of useful resources and reference material will also be provided.


Science & Technology
Related Sessions

C-3 Handle with Care: Practical Considerations for Using the New Machine Translations of Chinese Patents

J-5 New Roles of Language Professionals in the Automotive Industry Today

MED-8 Assisting Researchers in the Translation and Submission of a Manuscript for Publication

MEL-4 Challenges of Scientific and Technical Terminology in Arabic>English Translation

P-1 Translation Activities for Aviation English Learning in Brazil

TRM-2 The Patent Cooperation Treaty Terminology Database: A Multilingual Resource for Technical Translators

 
 
Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

T-1 Translating "Politically Correct" Language
Laurence Bogoslaw
(Thursday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

We may sometimes make fun of "politically correct" language, but it has become a vital strategy for conveying respect in English-language official documents. A common problem in translating such documents is preserving the spirit of respectful communication without overstretching target-language norms of grammar and usage. In this hands-on workshop, attendees will receive a list of English phrases addressing such areas as gender-neutral communication, disabilities, and medical diagnoses. We will then brainstorm ideas for translating the phrases into other languages. Attendees will be encouraged to share their own relevant examples.


T-2 Cultural Sensitivity in Political Translation
Neil Gouw
(Thursday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Translating political terms can be quite challenging. Political writing is country-specific, so how are key issues such as political ideologies and hot-button topics represented accurately and fairly in another language? How does a translator maintain cultural sensitivity when grappling with such challenges? This session will focus on the art of political translation and the dilemmas faced by the translator. The differences between the U.S. and Dutch political systems will be discussed as an example.


T-3 CANCELLED
Traveling the Intercultural Highway
Inga Michaeli
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




T-4 Localization at Google: Establishing a Voice
Svein Hermansen
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

At Google, our voice is integral to our brand: Google talks to users in a different way than most other companies. That means our localization needs to work differently, too. Our translations should not only be correct and comprehensible-but engaging, lively, and idiomatic. These are not typical features of information technology language, and seasoned translators in this area may not be used to focusing on them. But at Google, we put natural language at the heart of our approach to localization quality and strive to unite it with our other business needs through innovative tools and processes.


T-5 More than a Coffee Break Amusement: Localizing Casual and Social Media Games
Christoph Niedermair and Frank Dietz
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Casual and social media games represent a large and expanding segment of the software industry that is expected to reach worldwide revenues of over $45 billion by 2016. This session will focus on the challenges inherent in localizing casual and social media games (e.g., length restrictions, platform-specific terminology, culture-specific content) and their integration into social networks.


T-6 Two Sides of a Coin: Software Localization from Both the Translator’s and Project Manager’s Perspectives
Tess Whitty and Eve Lindemuth Bodeux
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

In today’s global economy, software localization is one of the most sought-after and lucrative specializations for technical translators. This session will focus on the software localization process from both the project manager’s and translator's perspectives, from file preparation to delivery. The speaker will provide practical guidelines for the dos and don'ts of localization, share resources, and offer techniques for ensuring consistency. There will also be a discussion on why quality assurance and testing are indispensable before releasing a localized software product.


T-7 CANCELLED
Future Vision of the Translation Industry: Where the Jobs Are
Uwe Muegge, Fredric Kropp, Lauren Thompson, and Adam Wooten
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




T-8 Fashionable Translations: From Designer Labels to Clothing Labels
Percy Balemans
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

In addition to clothes, the fashion world also produces texts. These vary from reviews of the latest haute couture collections shown in Paris or London to the clothing labels sewn into the coat you bought. This session will provide background information about the fashion world. The speaker will discuss the type of fashion texts that are translated, the problems you may encounter when translating texts related to fashion, and how you can keep current with the fast-moving fashion world.


T-9 Two Important New Translation Standards: TIPP and XLIFF:doc
Andrzej Zydron and Alan Melby
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The lack of proper interoperability among computer-assisted translation tools has been a constant problem from the beginning. So far, XLIFF and TMX have failed to provide a real practical solution. The Linport Project is developing an open, vendor-independent format that can be used by many translation tools to package translation material. At the heart of Linport are TIPP and XLIFF:doc and translation specifications based on ISO/TS 11669. This session will provide a detailed breakdown of this new standards initiative and how it fits into the overall translation workflow.


T-10 Bilingual Writing for Big Business: A Workshop
Maggey Oplinger
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English with French examples)

Bilingual writing has few rules and even fewer practitioners, yet responds perfectly to the needs of companies around the world. Come explore bilingual writing as it has developed and is practiced at a Fortune 100 company. While the samples provided will be in French, attendees can bring their own practice material. Attendees bringing their own material will need a marketing and a sales text in both the source and target language that deals with similar (but not identical) topics.


T-11 Translation Standards
Maria Brau
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

ISO 11669-2012 and ASTM F2575-06 (currently under revision) are mainly directed toward products and processes in the translation industry. The Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR), an informal association of U.S. government agencies, develops skill level descriptions to standardize proficiency and performance assessments. The ILR Skill Level Descriptions (SLDs) for Translation (2005), Interpretation (2007), and Audio Translation (2012) focus on the individual’s performance, prerequisite skills, and characteristic outputs in order to provide a basis for assessment before and after hiring. The speaker will discuss the ILR SLDs and their use in translation test development.


T-12 What’s in a Line Break?
Bianca Bold and Carolina Alfaro de Carvalho
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Have you ever paid attention to a line break? Subtitle translators learn to do what is called "spotting": segmenting blocks of oral text into subtitles and deciding whether and how to divide each one into two lines. Since people do not read one word at a time, but sets of words, successful spotting conveys the message more seamlessly. Rhythmic and grammatical criteria can be applied to other contexts where text layout affects the reader’s experience (e.g., presentations, brochures, posters, banners, and websites). The speaker will demonstrate how a mere line break can add value to your translation.


T-13 ATS: Acronym Translation Strategies
Jennifer Mercer
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Acronyms, initialisms, and abbreviations can be cryptic even in the original language, but they present particular difficulties for translators. Acronyms are rarely listed in dictionaries and are often unknown outside of a specific field—or even a single company. We will explore tips and techniques for deciphering these tiny linguistic puzzles. In the process, we will review types of acronyms, discuss when acronyms should and should not be translated, and explore unconventional strategies that are useful for a variety of translation challenges. An updated list of acronym translation resources will be presented along with techniques for finding additional resources.


T-14 NEW SESSION
Translation Standards in ASTM and ISO: What It Means for You
Bill Rivers, David Rumsey, and Alan Melby
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

National and international standards for translation continue to evolve. Leaders of ASTM Technical Committee F43, Language Services and Products (the U.S. national standards committee for the language enterprise) and International Standards Organization Technical Committee 37 (which has jurisdiction over translation) will discuss the latest developments in standards for translation services, including project specifications and certification for language services providers. The implications of these standards for practicing translators will also be addressed.


T-15 NEW SESSION
Why First Impressions Matter!
Dagmar Dolatschko
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What your work looks like is just as important as the content. Many translators are so focused on the words that they do not pay much attention to how they submit their work. Even the best translation will be discredited if the formatting is sloppy and causes a project manager hours of rework. This session will cover basic formatting techniques in multiple applications, the hazards of computer-assisted translation tools on formatting, and how to communicate questions and other aspects of your work effectively.


Translation
Related Sessions

SEM-H Plain Language Translation

F-1 Bringing The Painting to Life: A Case Study in Transcreation

J-1 The Pitfalls of Video Game Localization

LT-1 Emerging Translation Technology Companies and Services

MED-3 Software Localization in the Medical Device Industry: What's Happening Behind the Scenes

SL-4 When to Be "Polite” (or Not) in User Interface Localization

 
 
Translation & Interpreting Professions
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TIP-1 NEW SESSION
Timor-Leste: A Snapshot of the Translating/Interpreting Scenario in Post-Conflict Areas
Marco Goncalves
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Working as a translator/interpreter in post-conflict areas can be a very challenging job, but a very rewarding one as well. This session will focus on the challenges faced by interpreters and translators working with the United Nations Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste during the period that followed the 2006 crisis. The speaker will discuss some of the creative solutions implemented in the field to make interpreters' lives a bit easier. Topics will also include accounts from operations in the field, the linguistic makeup of Timor-Leste, and the challenges/opportunities for global cooperation.


 
 
Training and Pedagogy
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TP-1 Teaching Translation in the Polyglot Classroom
Elizabeth Lowe McCoy, Patricia Phillips Batoma, Enrica Ardemagni, Anastasia Lakhtikova, and Anne Fountain
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This panel discussion will explore the issues surrounding teaching translation in the polyglot classroom, including recommendations for best practice. Panelists will showcase learning modules and assignments that can be applied to students of all language pairs without the instructor needing to know all of the languages. Some key differences between the pedagogical objectives of foreign-language teachers and those of translation teachers will also be discussed. What does a teacher need to know in order to best manage this translation teaching model?


TP-2 Preparing Translation Students to Be Critical Readers of Machine Translation
Patricia Phillips Batoma, Leonardo Giannossa, Uwe Muegge, Alan Melby, and Jon Ritzdorf
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

What do translation students need to know in order to become savvy users of machine translation (MT)? Should students be taught the basics of computer programming, learn to examine how algorithms function, or how statistics-based MT works vs. rules-based MT? Would such knowledge make students critical readers and more efficient users of MT? In this session, experts on MT and translation instructors will present their viewpoints and showcase learning modules that address the issue of teaching MT to translation students.


TP-3 New Technologies for Interpreter Training
Marcelle Castro
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will explore the use of information and communications technology in interpreter training, with a focus on computer-assisted interpreter training tools. The speaker will discuss how these tools can be used in both face-to-face and distance interpreter training. The advantages and disadvantages of including these technologies in training programs will also be addressed.


TP-4 Online Interpreter Training: U.K. Study and Format
Helena El Masri
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What should an online training course cover? It should have specialized terminology, detail common mistakes and other types of errors, and discuss the role of ethics (including ethical dilemmas). Practical work should include consecutive and simultaneous interpreting, as well as sight translation and written translation.


TP-5 Successful Transitioning: Teaching Students to Thrive in the Translation Industry
Steven Gendell, Eve Hecht, Rosene Zaros, Milena Savova, and Jon Ritzdorf
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

It has never been easier to break into the translation business, or has it? Increasingly, clients demand industry- and company-specific terminology, jobs require ever-faster turnaround times, and when contracting new translators, clients often take a sink-or-swim attitude. How can university programs and educators build better, stronger, faster, and more accurate translators who thrive on the challenges of this fast-paced and ever more cost-conscious industry? In this session, panelists will explore various approaches for helping students transition into their new careers successfully.


TP-6 Opening or Closing Doors? How the Translation of Educational Documents Affects the Analysis of Credentials
Barbara Glave and Pilar Menéndez
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The translation of academic and professional documentation is deceptively simple. Two senior credentials analysts will lead a discussion on the relationship between translation and the evaluation of academic/professional credentials. How could the quality of a translation affect the outcome of an evaluation for further study, employment, licensing, and immigration? Attendees will learn about various resources to help them meet the many challenges of this type of translation.


Training and Pedagogy
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MED-1 Training and Ethical Challenges in Health Care Interpreting

MED-2 A Home for Trainers: An Initiative of the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care

P-1 Translation Activities for Aviation English Learning in Brazil

S-1 Note-Taking in Consecutive Interpreting: Friend or Foe?

 
 
Terminology
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TRM-1 The Vocabulary of International Affairs
Joseph Mazza
(Thursday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The head of the U.S. State Department’s translating team will provide a crash course in the vocabulary of international affairs. While translators may keep up with world events in newspapers and online, do they always understand the finer points behind the key terms? What are the buzzwords at Foggy Bottom (the State Department)? What subtopics are most important? Where can translators turn for help in researching this vocabulary? This session is intended for translators of any language.


TRM-2 The Patent Cooperation Treaty Terminology Database: A Multilingual Resource for Technical Translators
Geoffrey Westgate and James Phillips
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This fall, the World Intellectual Property Organization will make a multilingual database of technical terminology available on its website. The database, developed in the context of translating international patent applications filed under the Patent Cooperation Treaty, contains terminology in 10 languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. In this session, the structure and contents of the database will be discussed and a demonstration given of the features offered by the online version. This session will be of interest to technical translators working in a variety of languages and subjects.


TRM-3 Term Extraction: 1,000 Term Candidates—Now What?
Barbara Inge Karsch
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

In this session, we will compare manual term extraction with automated procedures and talk briefly about term extraction engines. The main focus will be on what to include in a termbase. This session will be of use to freelancer translators and translation project managers who have always wanted, but never mined, a text for new terms. A basic understanding of translation environment tools and terminology work will be helpful, but is not a prerequisite for attending the session.



Terminology
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