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CONFERENCE SESSIONS
 —  SESSIONS BY LANGUAGE
 —  SESSIONS BY SPECIALIZATION
 —  SESSION SCHEDULE
 —  SESSION SEARCH
ATA ATA Activities ET Education & Training
FIN Financial T&I I Interpreting
IC Independent Contractors L Literary Translation
LAW Legal T&I LSC Language Services Companies
LT Language Technology MED Medical T&I
ST Science & Technology T Translation
TIP Translation & Interpreting Professions TRM Terminology




ATA Activities
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ATA-1 ATA Mentoring Program: Becoming a Happy and Prosperous Translator/Interpreter
Eric Chiang, Susanne van Eyl, Paula Gordon, and Cathi Witkowski Changanaqui
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

ATA's Mentoring Program welcomes aspiring (also past and present) mentors and mentees for a discussion about the program and how we can help newcomers become prosperous professional translators and interpreters.


ATA-2 ATA Code of Ethics and Professional Practice Workshop
Caitilin Walsh
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

While codes of ethics sometimes appear dry and boring as written, applying them in real life can create interesting and juicy dilemmas. This session will examine how ATA's Code of Ethics and Professional Practice applies to real-life situations. It will also address some of the grey areas of professional conduct in translation and interpreting. This session fulfills the ethics requirement for maintaining ATA certification.


ATA-3 School Outreach Made Easy
Birgit Vosseler-Brehmer
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday 8:30am to Friday 4:00pm

This session will provide information and advice for language professionals interested in participating in ATA's School Outreach Program. It will highlight the importance of reaching out to the younger generation and giving them firsthand information about our profession. Step-by-step, the speaker will walk participants through the process of presenting in a school, including selecting a school, contacting a teacher, finding material, and presenting it effectively to different age groups. In addition, participants will learn how to compose a winning photo for the Annual School Outreach Contest.


ATA-4 Buddies and Newbies Debrief and Prepare for Post-Conference
Helen Eby and Jamie Hartz
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

This session will help participants process all of the information they will take in during the conference, as well as evaluate how the Buddies and Newbies activities helped them. The speakers will introduce participants to ATA's Mentoring Program, divisions, listservs, and local chapters and explain their benefits. The speakers will also provide suggestions on ways to follow up with all of those business cards participants will receive (e.g., storing them, sending e-mail, and continuing to network).


ATA-5 NEW SESSION
Preparing to Take ATA's Certification Exam: Questions and Answers
Geoffrey Koby and Jonathan Mendoza
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This forum will be of interest to ATA members seeking a better understanding of ATA's certification exam. The speaker will answer questions about certification policies and procedures. Tips on how to prepare for the exam will also be given.


ATA Activities
Related Sessions

IC-12 How to Approach and Win Direct Clients with ATA's Client Outreach Kit

LAW-9 How to Work with Your Local Courts

Education & Training
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ET-1 Teaching Translation Online: Quality Assessment and Control
Lorena Terando, Jose Davila Montes, Leah Leone, and Milena Savova
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This panel discussion will address the many facets of quality assessment and control in the context of teaching in an online environment. Topics will include intended learning outcomes for online translation courses, how to ensure quality in the online course development phase, student evaluation of online courses and programs, and faculty assessment of student learning in an online environment.


ET-2 Service-Learning as Translation Pedagogy: Models and Best Practices
Laura Kanost, Ardis Nelson, and Erika Sutherland
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Service-learning gives students an opportunity to experience and reflect upon the role of the translator through mutually beneficial community interaction. Orchestrating that interaction and monitoring the resulting student work can be a challenge. The panelists will present a concise overview of service-learning best practices along with three successful undergraduate program models: 1) using computer-assisted translation tools to translate simple documents for multiple community clients, 2) producing content for a bilingual newspaper, and 3) developing a bilingual immigrant affairs website. Examples of course material (e.g., syllabi, rubrics, print copies of newspaper, reflection activities) will be available. Time will be allotted for questions.


ET-3 Globalizing Functionalism the Functional Way
Christiane Nord
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English, German, and Spanish )

This session will use examples from the seminal book on functionalism in translation, Grundlegung einer allgemeinen Translationstheorie, co-authored by Katharina Reiss and Hans J. Vermeer. After a functional analysis of these examples, classifying them according to their object of reference will help us lay the foundation for a comparison and discussion of the translation strategies and techniques applied when translating the book into Spanish (Fundamentos para una teoría funcional de la traducción) and English (Towards a General Theory of Translational Action).


ET-4 Strengths and Weaknesses of a Pilot Internship Program: Key Considerations
Mónica Rodríguez-Castro and Madalena Sánchez Zampaulo
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of an internship program that is being piloted with graduate translation students at the University of Louisville. Preliminary data will be used to evaluate the difficulties faced by translation students entering the labor force, along with suggestions on how to better prepare students for professional life. Constraints associated with the development of an interdisciplinary curriculum will also be discussed. Initiating a discourse between educators and employers will enhance internship opportunities and strengthen student skills.


ET-5 Cut Your Cloth to Fit Your Coat: Tailoring Instructional Activities to Context-Specific Learning Goals
Rachel Herring
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Supporting interpreting skills development in students (or working interpreters) of differing backgrounds and levels of experience in a broad range of instructional settings is an ever-present challenge for trainers. Trainers must purposefully select or adapt practice material and integrate them into activities that support students as they acquire or refine skills. In this process, trainers must consider both pedagogical goals and the specific learning context. The speaker will present principles for and examples of context-specific goal-setting, selection/adaptation of material, and the tailoring of exercises.


ET-6 What Am I Missing? Patient-Centered Interpreter Training: Beyond the Basics
Maria Schwieter
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

There are many principles that guide interpreter practice, including patient safety, education, scope of practice, and professional growth. How do these principles influence our training process for interpreters? What is our best practice? Who are our collaborators and colleagues? How does this fit into our training models? What more can we give to our students to make them better practitioners? Going beyond the basics can help our students achieve a higher level of skills and expectations. This session will present some ideas on how to enhance your curricula so you can better prepare your students for the "real world."


ET-7 Technology and Teaching Interpreting Online and in the Virtual Classroom: Quantum Leap Forward or Two Steps Back?
Elizabeth McCoy, Barry Olsen, Elias Shakkour, Paul Gatto, and Leah Leone
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday 4:00pm to Saturday 10:00am

As the translation and interpreting professional landscape changes, and as technologies for the profession multiply, academic programs must train students to learn and work in virtual environments. In the translation and interpreting professions, the process of developing online courses and designing virtual classrooms, while attempting to replicate key aspects of traditional training programs, comes with a unique set of, as yet, largely unexplored challenges. In this session, we will discuss the advantages, challenges, and intricacies of the virtual classroom for translation and interpreting by comparing them with more traditional training models and by drawing upon our own experiences.


Education & Training
Related Sessions

TRM-1 Terminology Management: A Panel Discussion on Practical Issues by and for Freelancers, Language Services Providers, Companies, and Educators

Financial T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

FIN-1 Translating Transfer Pricing Documentation into English
Ted Wozniak
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The demand for translations of (mandatory) transfer pricing documentation is increasing steadily. This session will provide an overview of what transfer pricing is and why it exists, the regulatory basis of transfer pricing, and the standard approved methods for determining transfer prices. The original English terminology will be discussed with respect to differences from standard "accounting-speak" in particular. Although examples will be based on German source texts, the focus will be on translation into English, so any translator with English as a target language can benefit. At the end, some specific issues with German source terminology will be addressed.


Financial T&I
Related Sessions

SEM-F German GAAP Master Class

SEM-L Effective Translation of Financial Marketing Materials

F-8 Deixis: A Style Tool That High-End French>English Translators Should Know

LAW-2 "Anatomy" of a Business Transaction

S-7 Avoiding the Anglicization of Spanish Contracts

TRM-3 Increasing Quality and Productivity: Using the Multilingual Resources of the European Union

Interpreting
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

I-1 Tools and Toys for 'Terps
Cristina Silva
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Tools for translators have long taken center stage on translation lists and discussion groups as the Holy Grails of productivity. As technology arrives on the interpreting scene, new tools, apps, and toys are also being developed for interpreters. Want to organize your glossaries? There is a tool for that! Want to record yourself and measure your voice pitch? We have got you covered! Want to take notes and record speakers? You are in luck! This session will explore tools, toys, tips, and tricks for today's interpreters. Participants are encouraged to bring smart phones and/or tablets to this interactive technology demonstration.


I-2 Where Did You Work Today? Emerging Service Delivery and Business Models in Interpreting
Barry Olsen and Katharine Allen
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

21st-century communication models are changing the way people interact and do business. These changes are affecting interpreters as well. From remote participation to virtual meetings and from webinars to videoconferences, interpreters frequently find themselves being asked to use new technologies. Many have emerged in recent years for delivering interpreting services. But what about the business models to support them? And how will interpreters make a living in this brave new world? Join us for a look at some of the emerging technologies and business models in the world of interpreting and for a discussion about how they may affect your practice.


I-3 Decoding Other People's Accents: Practical Phonology for Interpreters
James Kirchner
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreting can be tough when you cannot understand someone's accent. Different languages have different rules for putting sounds together, and these produce different results when their speakers communicate in English. However, there are a few basic principles that can help you get accustomed to the accents of people with various native languages and decipher what they are saying. This session will present a crash course to get you started. It is a reprise of the session given at the 2012 ATA conference in San Diego, with some material added and revised.


I-4 Interpreting Across Sectors: Best Practice Strategies for the Consecutive and Simultaneous Modes
Katharine Allen
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Consecutaneous? Short simul? Sim-consec? Long and short consec? The interpreting marketplace is increasingly demanding that interpreters work across sectors. Just as the conference, legal, medical, and community interpreting sectors have developed distinct, if overlapping, ethics, standards of practice, and protocols, so too are the "best practice" strategies for the consecutive and simultaneous modes in each sector. These practices are dictated by the setting, the purpose of the communication, and often, the resources available. This session will provide experienced participants with concrete strategies and practice opportunities for how to best apply the two interpreting modes, depending on where they are used.


I-5 Over-the-Phone: The Future of Interpreting?
Harry Sasson
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English w/Spanish examples)

Over-the-phone interpreting is a growing field of opportunity for interpreters. The speaker will make an extensive comparison of the differences between this mode of interpreting and the more traditional face-to-face interpreting. The history and evolution of the profession will be reviewed and analyzed. The speaker will share many of his actual work experiences in both of these complementary interpreting forms. Some examples may be partially in Spanish.


I-6 Blaze a Trail of Fire: New International Standards for Interpreting
Marjory Bancroft
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




I-7 The Interpreter's Dirty Secret: Summarization-From Taboo to Technique (and Why It Matters)
Marjory Bancroft and Katharine Allen
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

In medical, emergency, police, business, and other settings, summarization is a fact of life. Rather than fight reality, why not study it? This session will explore summarization as an interpreting mode that is just as valuable in emergencies as simultaneous. In this session, you will practice scenarios involving 911 calls, several people yelling at once, and a lightning-fast conference speaker. Summarization is a higher-level skill that requires you to capture the main ideas, structure, and intent. You also have to make split-second decisions about: a) where and how to summarize, b) when to stop, and c) how to disclose the summarization.


I-8 Military Interpreting: A Fast-Rising Field in Conference Interpreting
Georganne Weller
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

There has been an unprecedented number of calls for military-related topics at conferences over the past few years (e.g., military training for police forces, combating transnational organized crime, and contingency plans for defending nuclear energy facilities). Discussion topics in this session will include the different types of subject matter included under "military interpreting," what is required to perform at a high level in the various interpreting modalities, specialized terminology, and ethics and confidentiality clauses.


I-9 Interpreting Profanity Over the Phone
Dariia Leshchuk Moss
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

The most interesting and difficult part of interpreting a telephonic conversation is that the interpreter is remote. The only way of passing information is through the professional's voice and intonation. This works well until the situation becomes a conflict over the phone involving aggressive conduct and profanity. The advantages and disadvantages of telephone conversations and detailed implementations of taboo vocabulary will be explored during this session. Russian, due to its culture's rich profanity, will be the main language discussed in this session, but examples in French, Spanish, and some other languages will be included.


Interpreting
Related Sessions

SEM-B Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts

SEM-K Diplomatic Protocol and the Interpreter: The Essentials

ET-5 Cut Your Cloth to Fit Your Coat: Tailoring Instructional Activities to Context-Specific Learning Goals

ET-6 What Am I Missing? Patient-Centered Interpreter Training: Beyond the Basics

J-6 Japanese to/from English Interpreting Workshop: Focusing on Short-Term Memory

LAW-7 Tackling Opening Statements and Closing Arguments in Simultaneous Interpreting

LAW-9 How to Work with Your Local Courts

LAW-10 Interpreting in a Legal Setting: Technological Paradigms and Challenging Trajectories

LT-3 The Effects of Different Remote Interpreting Technologies

MED-6 Mental Health Interpreting: Demystifying the Black Box

P-1 The Secrets of Success in Medical Translation and Interpreting

P-2 The Most Important Things Interpreters Should Know Before Starting Their Professional Careers

S-3 Interpreting Taboos: Sex, Religion, Death, and (Manifestations of) Mental Disorders

S-8 How to Cure the Difficulty in English Pronunciation for Spanish Speakers

SL-6 Interpreting for International Visitors: Hot Pursuit of Happiness

Independent Contractors
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

IC-1 The Freelance Juggling Act: Tips for Living the Life You Want
Eve Lindemuth Bodeux, Corinne McKay, Marianne Reiner, and Andrew Morris
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Wondering how to maintain your sanity while running a thriving business, focusing on family, pursuing non-work interests, and contributing to the profession? Come interact with a panel of experienced translators who will share their thoughts on how to ensure a healthy work-life balance in our fast-paced, globally-focused profession. All of us have (or should have) a life outside work. This panel will provide you with practical tips on how to achieve the goal of work-life balance and avoid burnout while focusing on your goal of earning a healthy income while living the kind of life you want.


IC-2 CANCELLED
Starting Out as a Freelance Translator
Sara Colombo
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)




IC-3 CANCELLED
Still Don't Have a Website? Why WordPress Is for You!
Max Troyer
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)




IC-4 The Minimalist Guide to Social Media for Translators
Tess Whitty
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

A strong online presence is an important and easy marketing strategy for freelance translators and interpreters. Aside from a website, your presence on social media is very important for marketing your translation or interpreting services online. But how do we create a strong presence without wasting a lot of valuable working time on social media? This session will give you the minimalist approach to a strong social media presence, focusing on three social media tools and strategies that only take 10 minutes a day.


IC-5 Managing the Mingling
John Di Rico
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

There are many personal and professional benefits to be derived from mingling. By the end of this session, you will have a better understanding of the benefits of attending a business or social function, be better prepared prior to attending such functions, and be able to employ different networking strategies during these functions.


IC-6 The Translator Scammers' Plague
João Roque Dias
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The devastating effects of identity fraud are found throughout all professions, and the language industry is no exception. Currently, some companies report that about 80-90% of the CVs they receive unsolicited are fake. If you are a language professional, your inbox has probably come in contact with scammers trying to use your name and qualifications to make an easy buck, or you have unknowingly requested work from someone who was not who you thought they were. The speaker will describe the most common (and not so common) practices used by the scammers and run down a checklist to spot fake CVs.


IC-7 Why Won't You Translate for Me?
Terena Bell, Ted Wozniak, Jill Sommer, and Sandra Alboum
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translation companies come to ATA to recruit translators, but each year many of these companies leave disappointed. They spend an entire week with great translators, but then those translators never apply. During this session, company owners and translators will try to figure out why post-conference connections might not happen. The speakers will discuss the (mis)conceptions many of us bring to the conference, as well as some possible ways for us to ensure that we continue working together after the conference.


IC-8 Security Clearances: A Gateway to Opportunity
Alair Fritz and Virginia Wilkins Hinders
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Having a security clearance can open doors to new clients and different types of work for linguists in all fields. But what exactly is a security clearance? How can a linguist get a clearance? What level is "high enough" for the work that is available? The speakers will explain the differences in security clearance levels and the steps that may be involved in obtaining a security clearance. Topics will include the barriers that can arise, the types of job opportunities that require security clearances, how current events have changed the investigative process, and, most importantly, what a security clearance means in today's competitive marketplace.


IC-9 Mastering the Challenges of a Direct-Client Portfolio
Chris Durban
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Working with direct clients can be financially rewarding and deeply satisfying, but it carries its own special challenges. As an external supplier, you must aim for the right breadth and depth of rapport: present but not overbearing, friendly but not fawning, demanding but not high maintenance, and available—at a price. How do you strike the right tone? (What is the right tone?) What gives you credibility and cements the relationship—and what cards should you definitely not tip? This session will examine the soft issues that can be particularly hard to navigate.


IC-10 Don't Leave Money You're Owed on the Table
Ruth Gentes Krawczyk
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

So you have worked in more than one country over your career and paid into multiple social security systems? Even if you are not about to retire, you still need to make sure your records are up-to-date so that when the time comes, you will be paid the money owed! The speaker will discuss the procedure for claiming social security from other countries while living in the U.S., focusing on Germany, the U.K., and Switzerland. As time allows, the speaker will include information about other countries.


IC-11 Navigating the International Payment Jungle
Sanne LeGier
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

It is difficult to know which payment system to chose. Between cost, speed, local availability, and other restrictions, it is easy to get frustrated. The speaker will examine the most common payment systems and methods and discuss their pros and cons.


IC-12 How to Approach and Win Direct Clients with ATA's Client Outreach Kit
Madalena Sánchez Zampaulo and Stephanie Tramdack Cash
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Learn how to capture potential clients' attention by using ATA's Client Outreach Kit. The speakers will discuss the customizable PowerPoint presentation, the skills modules designed to help guide you through the steps toward winning invitations to speak, how to promote your presentation, preparing and executing the presentation successfully, and tips for handling question-and-answer sessions. They will also cover the Terms of Use Agreement and guidelines for the use of the ATA logo. Participants will walk away with a better understanding of how to utilize the Client Outreach Kit and pitch their business to prospective clients confidently.


IC-13 Quote This! The Seven Essential Elements of a Language Services Price Quote
Judy Jenner
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Many colleagues have had challenges with non-paying customers and customers who want to change the agreed-upon price, deadlines, or even the project scope. Many of these disagreements can be prevented, to a large extent, by drafting a strong language services price quote for the client to sign. Once signed, this document becomes the binding contract between the parties, so it should be drafted with great attention to detail. The speaker will discuss the essential elements that any price quote should have. This session does not constitute legal advice.


IC-14 Expert Marketing: How to Position Yourself as a Specialist
Marta Stelmaszak
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

With increasing interest in business and marketing, more and more colleagues get to the point where their businesses are profitable, they no longer struggle with low rates or bothersome clients, and they can comfortably call themselves "established." Once you are established, how do you position your business at the expert level? The speaker will provide a detailed analysis of how a few high-profile careers in various professions achieved expert status. Apart from more theoretical concepts on expert marketing, this session will cover marketing tools that can be put into practice immediately, including improvements to brochures, websites, or marketing strategies.


IC-15 How to Price Your Work and Stay on Top of Your Business
Jonathan Hine
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday 11:30am to Friday 2:00pm

Translators and interpreters are in business. Pricing and monitoring financial performance are crucial to business success. This session will cover the elements of budgeting and business planning. The methodology will help participants develop personal criteria for accepting or rejecting freelance assignments, balancing employment offers, and choosing alternatives for business expansion. Other topics will include calculating the break-even price and tracking sales volume and revenue. This session is not about number-crunching. Come prepared to enjoy learning how to set your business on a solid financial footing and keep it there.


IC-16 Everything You've Always Wanted to Ask Project Managers but Were Afraid to Ask
Giovana Boselli
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

How do translation companies pick new vendors for a job? Would project managers rather receive a phone call, an e-mail with a cover letter and a CV, or a visit from a potential vendor? What makes a project manager want to continue working with a vendor? The answers to these and other questions will be revealed from the results of a survey of project managers/translation companies. You will get tips and insider's ideas on the best approaches, how to negotiate prices, how to keep a good relationship with project managers, and much more.


IC-17 Shielding Your Data from Prying Eyes: Five Quick and Easy Steps for Translators
Michael Wahlster
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What we used to dismiss as paranoia has become the new normal. In the recent past, we have learned that practices like e-mail interception and unauthorized access are all too common. This is a serious concern for translators, who spend large parts of their lives on the Internet. While there is no absolute security against such encroachments, participants will learn about five simple, easy-to-implement steps to increase the security barrier. To be safe and private on the Internet requires some effort, but the speaker will show that it does not need to be particularly onerous.


IC-18 NEW SESSION
Time Management for Translators
John Di Rico
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Procrastination wastes time and reduces your output. This session will challenge you to view the "tyranny of time" from a different angle and take clear steps toward a more controlled approach to time management, or, more precisely, on activity management. You will learn to structure activities and plan your days to get the most out of the time you have to maximize business and pleasure.


IC-19 NEW SESSION
Claims Against Translators: Prevention, Mitigation, and Resolution
Martin Ween
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will initially discuss what types of claims can be made and have been made against translators, including what standards of care may be used to judge the performance of services and what theories of recovery can be asserted. There will also be a discussion of ways in which claims against translators can possibly be prevented, including protocols, practices, and contractual provisions; ways that a claim, once made, can be mitigated or reduced in severity; and the best ways to obtain resolution of the claims so as to avoid their revival or recurrence.


IC-20 NEW SESSION
Language Professions at the United Nations
María Barros
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In this session, the speaker will provide an overview of the range of employment opportunities available for language professionals at the United Nations. Professions including interpreters, translators, editors, verbatim reporters, text processors, language reference assistants, terminologists, and language teachers will be discussed. The speaker will also describe, in detail, the UN's policies and requirements for language staff, specifically at their New York headquarters.


Independent Contractors
Related Sessions

SEM-C How to Get and Keep Their Attention: Optimizing Your Website for Potential Clients

SEM-I You're Your Own Boss, But...: Advanced Topics in Running a Freelance Business

I-2 Where Did You Work Today? Emerging Service Delivery and Business Models in Interpreting

L-3 How to Self-Publish Your Translations

T-12 Conquering the World of Content: How Translators Can Seize Opportunities in Content Marketing

TIP-6 Why We Need to Become Good Storytellers

TIP-8 Why Raising the Bar on Your Own Translation Quality Is About to Get Deadly Serious

TRM-1 Terminology Management: A Panel Discussion on Practical Issues by and for Freelancers, Language Services Providers, Companies, and Educators

Literary Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

L-1 Literary Translation as a Tool for Nation-Building: The Case of Modern Hebrew
Ioram Melcer
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

By the mid-1800s, Modern Hebrew had become the national language of the Jews, who were emerging in the international political scene. Part and parcel of their nation building was a cultural revival. Expanding the previous phases of Hebrew and forming a fully functional language was a process in which literary translation played a major part. Literary translators were commissioned with masses of texts to translate, thus assisting in the establishment of a Modern Hebrew culture. The speaker will discuss the role of translators in this process, comparing it to other instances where translation may have played a similar part.


L-2 Odd Couple Collaboration in Poetic Translation
Lydia Stone
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English w/Russian examples)

The speaker will describe the process of translating a Russian poem in collaboration with a poet whose approach to poetry is completely different from her own. The poet favors the emotional and dramatic, while the translator prefers the understated and ironic. The poet thinks in images, the translator needs a rational story line. Nevertheless, they worked together amicably and produced a poetic translation with which they were both delighted. A literal English translation of the original, the final poetic one, and partial English versions will be discussed, as will quotations from the Internet correspondence through which the author and translator collaborated.


L-3 How to Self-Publish Your Translations
Rafa Lombardino
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

If you hold the copyright to a book translation, what is the next step you must take to publish and distribute it to your target audience? In this session, you will learn more about what online tools are currently available for you to self-publish your translations as eBooks and print-on-demand paperbacks. We will also discuss ideas on cover design and marketing strategies to spread the word about your work and increase readership.


L-4 What's in a Name? On Translating (or Not) Titles, Character Names, Place Names, and Cultural Referents in Literary Texts
Mercedes Guhl, Paula Gordon, Faiza Sultan, and Abe Haak
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speakers will discuss the challenges posed by the translation of names in literary texts. Do translators stick to the original names or substitute them with domesticated or newly concocted versions? What do they leave out or add to the text in doing so? The speakers will discuss how the options for translating names will vary depending on language combination and direction, the attitude of a certain culture to another, or book industry practices.


L-5 Ethics of Cultural Translation: Homi K. Bhabha, Third Space, and Fictional Representations of Mexico City
Alice Whitmore
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

This session will examine the politics of cultural translation in relation to the dirty realist fiction of Mexican author Guillermo Fadanelli. Fadanelli's writing is inseparable from the urban space of Mexico City, a setting brimming with tension, cultural mutation, heteroglossia, and multiplicity. Drawing upon the theories of Homi K. Bhabha and Gayatri Spivak, the speaker will propose a distinct translation ethic that situates translation within an uneasy space across and between cultures, where anxiety gives way to production. Like Fadanelli's fictional Mexico City, the hybrid site of translation not only represents otherness, but engenders difference, innovation, and newness.


Literary Translation
Related Sessions

SEM-D Pushing the Envelope: Translating Invented Languages, Mock Words, Puns, and Wordplay

SEM-J "The Other" in Literary Translation

G-6 Translation and the Former East Germany

P-5 Venus and Adonis: A Tale of Seduction (Now) Told in Portuguese

Legal T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LAW-1 CANCELLED
Unveiling Legalese with Ease
Ingrid Olsson and Lawrence Abramson
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English w/Swedish examples)




LAW-2 "Anatomy" of a Business Transaction
Hadassah Weiner
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will examine the elements of a simple acquisition transaction (purchase and sale of a business) from the time discussions begin through closing. Emphasis will be on key transaction documents and clauses, as well as recurring words and phrases. Learning to improve your understanding of the context in which you may be translating should provide a springboard to more complex transactions. This session will also be appropriate for financial translators who encounter transactional documents and terminology in their work.


LAW-3 Translation Issues in International Environmental Lawsuits
Lisa Grayson
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Residents who believe the environmental integrity of their neighborhoods has been damaged by a corporation's actions can sue for damages. When the residents and the corporation are in different nations with different languages, both sides may need reams of documents translated. We will examine the range of documents a translator may face in environmental class-action suits, from scientific reports to in-depth constitutional analysis to casual e-mails, and how to convey the tone of various source documents. We will also address practical problems, such as working with multiple attorneys and translators under tight deadlines.


LAW-4 Finding the One Best Term: Drafting Legal Translations with Precision and Vivid Language
Jean Campbell
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will show how logic and subject can be used to develop a reliable method to make vivid and clear restatements of the source text in any target language. This process will be demonstrated by translating various words into English ("sociale" from French, "aktiv" from German, and "derechos politicos" from Spanish). Participants will discover how the principles governing ideal word choice are transferrable to any language pair, as this issue results from the natural ambiguity of all languages. A vivid translation will be produced collectively by participants.


LAW-5 Million Dollar Commas, Misplaced Modifiers, and Other Fine Points for Legal Translators
Hadassah Weiner
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will highlight the challenges involved when translating legal documents into U.S. English. Some of these issues might appear minor, but they could have significant consequences. Whether you are translating from or into English, this session will help you recognize potential pitfalls, increase your comfort with recurring words and phrases, and raise your awareness concerning the role of punctuation. This session will also be appropriate for financial translators who encounter legal documents and terminology.


LAW-6 Court Interpreting and Criminal Terminology
Emily Ortiz Alfonso
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Spanish)

In this session, participants will be introduced to more than 100 common legal criminal terms, their meanings, and target-language renditions. Throughout this session, extensive key terminology and a glossary of terms will be used. Participants will review the language and terms commonly used during criminal court proceedings, followed by group discussions.


LAW-7 Tackling Opening Statements and Closing Arguments in Simultaneous Interpreting
Yvette Citizen
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Opening statement and closing argument monologues comprise the simultaneous portion of most court interpreter certification tests, including the federal and state oral exams. In this session, we will analyze and practice the general components of opening statements and closing arguments to equip interpreters with the knowledge and skill to render them successfully when they arise, be it on a test or in the courtroom. We will explore how to interpret persuasive language, idiomatic expressions, and other linguistic features effectively as we listen to authentic recordings and review written scripts.


LAW-8 Has Everything That Can Be Invented Been Invented?
Olga Shostachuk
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In a global market driven by science and technology, inventions that cover a wide gamut of legal and technical matters require accurate patent translation. This session will provide an overview of the form and structure of a patent and dissect the standard clauses and terminology. The speaker will also provide tips on how to keep patent clauses readable and clear and how to use definitions, bibliographic information, and the structure of a patent effectively for terminology research. Examples from Russian and U.S. patent terminology will be used.


LAW-9 How to Work with Your Local Courts
Ida Chen, Magdaliz Roura, and Antonio Guerra
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will detail how developing a relationship with the Philadelphia courts helped both the local ATA chapter and the local courts build capacity, collaborate on programs, and support each other. A court administrator will explain why reaching out to the Delaware Valley Translators Association (DVTA) was key to a successful language access program. A member of DVTA's board of directors will describe how working with the court administrator helped the organization meet the needs of some of its members. In particular, a Philadelphia judge will share strategies that resulted in mutually beneficial outcomes to show that courts, working alone, cannot guarantee access to justice.


LAW-10 NEW SESSION
Interpreting in a Legal Setting: Technological Paradigms and Challenging Trajectories
Thelma Ferry
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreting is a challenging and unique profession. Conveying meaning accurately in two languages is a demanding job in the interpreting process. This session will focus on the importance of maintaining effective lines of communication with court administrative staff members, including judges and attorneys, to facilitate adequate communication to ensure due process in a court of law. Highlights include technological challenges, strategic trajectories, collaborative efforts, and the fundamental role that interpreters perform in facilitating language access by bridging language barriers. This session will include exercises utilizing scripted material and hands-on electronic interpreting equipment. Handouts and glossaries will be provided.


LAW-11 NEW SESSION
Foster Care and Adoption in the U.S.: The Long and Winding Road
Lorena Pike
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Child Protection Services and the Department of Family Services, under applicable family law, are agencies that initiate action for child protection or criminal proceedings due to child abuse or neglect. Interpreters are called for court and out-of-court meetings related to the removal of children and their potential adoption, or to help communicate the requirements foster care homes and adopting parents must fulfill. This makes the entire process a very long, intricate journey for all parties involved. This session will provide an overview of the terminology related to the process that starts with allegations of child abuse or neglect—which ultimately leads to foster care and potential adoption.


Legal T&I
Related Sessions

SEM-B Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts

C-1 The Art of Crafting Target Language in Chinese to English Translation

F-5 If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Cassation: A Whirlwind Tour of French Civil Procedure

G-8 Untangling German Legalese: Talkin' Like The Supremes

LSC-3 What Legal Clients Want: The Production/Consumption Interface

MEL-3 Legal and Ethical Considerations in Arabic Translation

S-6 The Legal Translation Dilemma

S-10 Mexican Civil Procedure

TRM-3 Increasing Quality and Productivity: Using the Multilingual Resources of the European Union

Language Services Companies
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LSC-1 CANCELLED
Stop Selling Translation Services and Start Providing Translation Solutions!
Ray Reyes
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




LSC-2 How Do You Human-Translate Over 100 Million Words Per Year?
Laurent Gottardo
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

How does translation take place at an operation handling a very large volume of human-translated work? How is work outsourced, how do procurement rules work, and how do you go about getting work from a large organization as an agency or an individual? The speaker will try to answer all of these questions while touching on the technical aspects. WorldServer, a large-scale translation management system, will be used as an example. The speaker will describe how quality control and terminology management are set up, discuss freely available resources, and examine what impact technology (e.g., machine translation) might have in the future.


LSC-3 What Legal Clients Want: The Production/Consumption Interface
Jean Campbell
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The legal translation and interpreting requirements of a large law firm operating globally will be examined during this session. Discussion topics will include determining the scope of translation (e.g., is the translation for a government agency, the court, an arbitration panel, or for internal information or public marketing), the use of translation as legal strategy, the cost-approval chain, and managing translation teams to meet rush deadlines. Situations requiring certification will also be addressed.


LSC-4 Nightmares in Project Management
Ida Jones
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Heading into a holiday weekend, a customer calls, frantic, with a large, multi-language project they absolutely must have ASAP (but no later than noon on Sunday) for a Monday event. You accept. There are calls all weekend with major changes to the specifications. On Monday morning, after having moved heaven and earth, you receive an e-mail stating that "local experts have declared the translations unfit for circulation," citing several errors. In this session, a project manager for the U.S. State Department will lead an information-sharing session where small groups will brainstorm approaches to such scenarios, examining the roles of translator and project manager alike.


LSC-5 CANCELLED
From Project Manager to Account Manager: Fulfilling the Needs of the Organization and Clients
Ray Reyes
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)




LSC-6 Ten Mistakes that Language Services Companies Make (and How to Avoid Them)
Hélène Pielmeier
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

If you think that your business is completely different from that of your competitors, we have news for you-you have more in common with your competitors than you think! In this session, independent industry research firm Common Sense Advisory will reveal how to avoid 10 common mistakes that your peers are making. The session will cover the latest research findings on what buyers of language services want, how to differentiate your business, and how to plan your business strategy.


LSC-7 Juggling Clients, Employees, and Linguists: A Business Owner's Perspective
Michael Bearden
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will focus on the everyday challenges a language services provider faces in the process of managing a team of project managers and support staff in a fast-paced and competitive market. We will reveal best-practice solutions and sustainable methods to maximize efficiencies without sacrificing any of the integrity of the translation process or final product. Participants will enjoy an objective, transparent glimpse into the work of a language services provider and receive tips to help them leverage their work and maximize the potential for success.


LSC-8 CANCELLED
Language Services Staff in International Organizations: The Ultimate Team Approach
Patrick Nunes
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




Language Services Companies
Related Sessions

TIP-3 Documenting Genocide: Translating History to Raise Awareness for the Future

TIP-7 The Next Wave: Curation, Mass Personalization, and Spoken Translation

TRM-1 Terminology Management: A Panel Discussion on Practical Issues by and for Freelancers, Language Services Providers, Companies, and Educators

Language Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LT-1 What Translation Technology Is Right for You?
Jost Zetzsche
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Sure, you might feel quite passionate about the translation technology you use, but is it the most efficient for the way you work, the languages you translate, and the way you like to collaborate? The speaker will work with participants to develop a decision matrix that will guide them to an individualized translation technology plan.


LT-2 Training a Dragon: Using Speech-to-Text to Boost Productivity
Andrew Levine
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Speech-to-text software has become remarkably fast and accurate in recent years. Though once used mainly for accessibility reasons, current tools have reached the point where they can enter text faster than many translators' ability to type, sometimes with greater error-resistance and ease of use. What advantages and disadvantages do these tools have? The speaker will discuss Dragon NaturallySpeaking and its best applications (as well as weaknesses) in the hands of translators looking to boost productivity. The session will include live demonstrations of Dragon used in computer-assisted translation tool environments.


LT-3 The Effects of Different Remote Interpreting Technologies
Carolyn Hager
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Technology will continue to bring dramatic change to interpreting. Unfortunately, technology is seen as exerting a negative pressure on both rates and quality. While true in part, it is an overgeneralization that technology is not in the best interest of the profession. Which technology platforms succeed with clients will play a key role in driving the ultimate relationship between technology and the interpreter.


LT-4 Xbench for Terminology Management and Translation Quality Assurance
Riccardo Schiaffino
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Xbench helps you organize terminology to take maximum advantage of glossaries, translation memories, and bilingual files. It also offers excellent translation quality functions. The speaker will show how to use the program for terminology management by organizing files into projects, as well as how to find information using simple and more advanced searches. He will then demonstrate how to use Xbench to improve translation quality by running checks to verify consistency and adherence to required terminology. Participants will also learn how to store customized tests in reusable checklists and to export the test results. The speaker will also look at Xbench's integration with SDL Studio 2014.


LT-5 Let Corpora Make Your Difficult Translations Easier!
Naomi Sutcliffe de Moraes
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

It can be difficult to find terminology for certain kinds of translations: academic articles, historical or literary texts, or engineering, scientific, or medical texts. This session will show you how to take advantage of ready-made monolingual and bilingual corpora and how to create your own small corpora to make life easier. The speaker will explain where to find corpora for many different languages and demonstrate a free tool (AntConc) that can be used to search your own project-specific corpora. Many examples will be given.


LT-6 Is Machine Translation Post-Editing for Me?
Jose Palomares
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Even though everyone is talking about machine translation right and left, most translators have not found their place in it yet. For those brave enough, post-editing is the easiest way for a translator to get involved with machine translation. However, it is often said that not every translator would make a good post-editor, and that the post-editing of machine translation does not pay back. In this session, we will review these two statements and share self-analysis exercises interactively with participants to determine the viability of post-editing, both professionally and financially.


LT-7 Two Sides of a Coin: Machine Translation and Post-Editing Projects from the Perspectives of the Client and Language Services Provider
Alfred Hellstern and Jay Marciano
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The speakers will examine the use of machine translation and post-editing in large-scale software localization projects. What does such an undertaking look like from the perspectives of the client and the language services provider? What expectations does a client have in terms of quality, pricing, turnaround, and application of specific technologies? What are the critical success factors for a language services provider in approaching those expectations? What are the benefits of machine translation and post-editing, and how are these benefits measured?


LT-8 Freeware Tools for Translators
Claudia Growney
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

As professional translators, we all know the benefits of computer-assisted translation or translation environment tools to leverage existing work. In addition to these better-known tools that usually require an initial investment, there are a variety of freeware tools available to automate some of the manual tasks in the translation process. The speaker will introduce three freeware tools that she uses on a daily basis: Ant Renamer (to rename files/extensions in a batch), ScreenHunter (to easily capture and save screen prints), and XBench (for quality assurance checks of bilingual files, especially across several documents). Beginners as well as experienced translators are welcome.


LT-9 The Wild West of Trados Studio OpenExchange Apps
Tuomas Kostiainen
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The SDL OpenExchange program includes about 100 applications that extend the functionalities of Trados Studio. However, many users are not utilizing this additional resource because they are either unaware of it or do not have time to put forth the extra effort required to search, install, organize, and learn to use these extended features. The speaker will discuss the benefits and problems of the OpenExchange approach, providing an overview of the types of apps available. Participants will be provided with the information they need to utilize these apps in their own work as translators or project managers.


LT-10 Hammer and Pick: Expanding Your Tool Belt with Free Technology
Jose Palomares
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Whereas some translators can afford to resort to only one or two tools to master their trade, the world is shifting quickly toward a scenario where client content will be so diverse that no tool will be able to support all translation needs. In this session, we will examine some of these scenarios and introduce and demonstrate a number of tools (mostly free) that can empower, supplement, or even replace your preferred computer-assisted translation tool. More importantly, such tools will enable any translator to offer new and better services to customers, such as optimization of the source text or data cleaning for machine translation.


LT-11 My Gizmo Does Not Fit That Whatsit!
Peter Reynolds and Jose Palomares
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Translators want to be able to use the tool they like best and not have to get a translation tool for every file format. Software developers have responded to user complaints about interoperability with even more variants of the same file formats. The answer to the interoperability issue is not more file formats. This session will detail the problem, but more importantly, suggest solutions. The speakers have built their careers around language, technology, and standards, and have very strong opinions about what our industry is doing wrong. Rather than give translators more work, the speakers would like to find new ways to empower them.


LT-12 Virtualization for Translators: Achieving a More Productive, Secure, and Efficient Work Environment
Alfonso Romero
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Virtualization is a powerful tool that can help translators get the most from their computer environment. This session will open with a brief overview of virtualization software. Then, using real scenarios based on his own experience, the speaker will discuss how virtual machines can help avoid losing precious time due to hardware/software failures. Participants will learn how to protect valuable data against potential online threats by effectively isolating the translation environment from the Internet. Participants will also learn how to test computer-assisted translation tools and other useful software applications on a separate virtual machine without disrupting their production environment.


LT-13 NEW SESSION
Fahrenheit 451? Before You Burn Your Dictionaries, Learn to Research in a Savvier Way
Thais Lips
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Most translators have learned to use translation memory software, but many still rely on time-consuming searches through paper dictionaries. The speaker surveyed several groups to discover what knowledge translators lack when it comes to working with electronic resources. This session will focus on optimizing terminology research through the use of dictionary software, integrating specialized glossaries and industry-standard monolingual and bilingual electronic dictionaries, and enhancing these capabilities further with online cross-referencing.


Language Technology
Related Sessions

I-1 Tools and Toys for 'Terps

I-2 Where Did You Work Today? Emerging Service Delivery and Business Models in Interpreting

J-7 Is Machine Translation Your Friend or Foe? Challenges for English>Japanese Translators

TIP-8 Why Raising the Bar on Your Own Translation Quality Is About to Get Deadly Serious

TIP-9 Embrace the Change: Top Trends that will Define the Future of the Translation Profession

Medical T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

MED-1 Newborn Screening and Inherited Metabolic Disorders
Martha Exebio Blackwood
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Each American state and many foreign countries mandate some form of newborn screening with the goal of identifying infants who are affected by certain conditions. Early identification of these conditions is important, since timely intervention can lead to reduction in morbidity, mortality, and associated disabilities in affected infants. Medical translators and interpreters may improve the quality of the services they render by understanding the newborn screening process and its terminology, as well as the metabolic disorders listed on the screening panels of most states. This session will discuss the basic concepts of newborn screening, focusing on the speaker's Texas experience.


MED-2 Linguistic Validation: Understanding Conceptual Equivalence in the Harmonization Procedure
Diana Sanchez
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

In addition to translation, multinational clinical trials must also undergo a strict linguistic validation process to ensure proper adaptation for the target languages and countries. This algorithm of checks and reviews requires intense and efficient management between project managers and translators, who will often encounter unique challenges specific to this sector. In this session, we will explain a standard linguistic validation process, the different phases in which feedback is to be analyzed, validated, and implemented, and the importance of harmonization in achieving optimum translation results.


MED-3 The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act for Medical Translators: The Other Side of the Privacy Fence
Danielle Maxson
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) has been in force since 1996, but recent changes in legislation have made knowledge of this law more important than ever for translators working with confidential patient health information. The speaker will summarize HIPAA and supporting legislation, outline basic requirements for HIPAA compliance, and discuss concrete steps medical translators can take to protect confidential information entrusted to them. Please note that the content of this session does not constitute legal advice.


MED-4 CANCELLED
Introduction to Neurosciences and Useful Links for Medical and Scientific Translators and Interpreters
Palma Chatonnet Marton and Arnaud Chatonnet
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)




MED-5 Maintaining Neutrality in Difficult Situations
Fabio Torres
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English )

This session will help equip interpreters to maintain neutrality during difficult interpreting sessions. In addition, participants will learn how to work with providers and family members who are experiencing vicarious trauma. This session will cover topics such as how to interpret for patients during end-of-life, how to interpret for children during traumatic situations, and how to interpret for victims of abuse with posttraumatic stress disorder and mental illness.


MED-6 Mental Health Interpreting: Demystifying the Black Box
Whitney Gissell
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

This session will arm participants with solutions to common barriers in achieving dynamically equivalent messages, especially regarding patients with speech impediments. The most common mental health diagnoses and treatment options, including a segment on pharmaceuticals, will be discussed. A broader knowledge of these aspects will equip interpreters with the ability to develop predictive language schema as they prepare for mental health assignments. The speaker will also discuss common assessment tools and suggest ways to navigate cultural and linguistic barriers effectively.


MED-7 Understanding U.S. Health Settings and Services to Avoid Common Interpreting and Translation Errors
Michelle Scott
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

What is the difference between a "nursing home" and a "skilled nursing facility?" Is "hospice" the same as "palliative care?" What are "wraparound services?" These are just a few examples of commonly misrendered terms and daily dilemmas faced by novice and veteran medical interpreters and translators. This session will explore various common U.S. health care settings and services. We will discuss how to handle languages that do not have equivalents for nuances and client communication. Participants will be encouraged to engage in problem solving.


MED-8 Translating for Success in the Pharmaceutical Industry: Beyond the Basics
Carmen Cross
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session will provide translators with a solid foundation for translating clinical trial documentation, including international standards, regulatory authorities, the phases involved in drug discovery, and the types of clinical trial documentation. Common stylistic and linguistic issues will be discussed, as well as terms that are often confused (e.g., "efficacy" versus "efficiency" and "patient" versus "subject"). Various strategies that translators can use at any stage in their career to improve their consistency and accuracy will also be discussed. The session will conclude with a demonstration on how to use PubMed as a terminology tool.


MED-9 Regulatory Translation of Generic Medication Product Information in the European Union
Diana Sanchez
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday 4:00pm to Friday 4:00pm

The speaker will discuss European legislation requirements for generic medication approval and share general considerations on how to proceed when translating product information, patient information leaflets, and labeling. In order to obtain final approval from the European Medicines Agency, translators are required to follow previously existing templates closely, often adapting content with no source text in hand. The speaker will demonstrate translation adaptation examples, focusing on the quality control methods applied to ensure compliance. The differences in regulatory requirements between the U.S. and Europe will also be addressed.


Medical T&I
Related Sessions

ET-6 What Am I Missing? Patient-Centered Interpreter Training: Beyond the Basics

F-1 Medical Language and Its Pitfalls

F-2 The Skills of a Good Medical Translator

G-2 New Techniques in Hip Surgery: Why It Is Important to Hit the Ground Running

P-1 The Secrets of Success in Medical Translation and Interpreting

S-1 El origen y la formación de los términos médicos

S-2 "Sorry Doctor, I Have 20 Fingers": How Cultural Differences between the Doctor and the Patient May Multiply the Number of Fingers

S-3 Interpreting Taboos: Sex, Religion, Death, and (Manifestations of) Mental Disorders

S-9 The English/Spanish Medical History Demystified

SL-2 Cut It Out: Improving Readability in Russian>English Technical Translations

ST-2 Gene Therapy: The New Frontier of Medicine

TRM-3 Increasing Quality and Productivity: Using the Multilingual Resources of the European Union

Science & Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ST-1 An Introduction to Nanomaterials: From Synthesis to Applications
Christiane Feldmann-Leben
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




ST-2 Gene Therapy: The New Frontier of Medicine
Tapani Ronni
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This session, intended for translators in medicine and sciences, will introduce the concept of gene therapy (i.e., deliberately changing genes in a patient's cells). Current applications will be discussed, including their limitations and risks. Possible future applications include DNA vaccinations and tailor-made anti-cancer drugs. Finally, we will explore the philosophical and ethical issues related to the hotly debated germ line gene therapy.


ST-3 CANCELLED
Left of Boom: Explosives and Bombing-Related Terminology, Part 2
Christina Schoeb
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




ST-4 From Oil Economy to Hydrogen Economy: An Introduction to Fuel Cells
Christiane Feldmann-Leben
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Friday 2:30pm to Friday 11:30am

In spite of many prophecies, we still use oil to drive our cars and coal or gas to produce energy. However, hydrogen has been considered as a substitute for oil ever since the NASA space program began. Whereas fuel cells have reached a highly advanced stage and already find applications beyond space flight, the means of producing and storing hydrogen are still under development. This session will provide a thorough introduction to fuel cells and discuss the problems and possible solutions still to be overcome for the vision of a hydrogen economy to become true.


ST-5 Grannies, Freds, and LSD: A Non-Pedestrian Introduction to Bicycles
Carola F. Berger
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The bicycle market is a $6 billion industry in the U.S. alone, and valued at over $50 billion globally. This session will take you on a whirlwind tour of all things bicycle, from low-end clunkers to high-end carbon fiber frames. Linguistically, you will learn what the jargon in this session's title really means (not what you think!). After this session, in addition to talking like a pro about the happenings in the peloton when you watch the next Tour de France, you will be able to translate the user manual for the newest electronic 22-speed gruppo, or localize the latest interactive global positioning system bicycling app.


ST-6 Agri-Food for Thought: How Agriculture Translates into Food
Leo van Zanten
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will cover some present and future aspects of agriculture in the world. The speaker will provide an overview of specific vocabulary, explain the meaning and background, and indicate the differences and relationships of various terms. The speaker will try to provide a better and deeper insight into the world of agricultural food production and the challenges for the future. There will also be examples of challenges and nuances in the translation of commonly used terminology, such as organic agriculture.


ST-7 Terminology in Integrated Circuits and Semiconductor Manufacturing
Di Wu
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday 10:00am to Friday 2:30pm

In a world increasingly driven by technology, integrated circuits made of semiconductors are at the heart of virtually everything we touch, such as cell phones, computers, appliances, and cars. This session will start with a brief history of semiconductor development. It will then go through the steps of semiconductor manufacturing, including wafer making, processing, wafer testing, device testing, and packaging. The speaker will also touch upon the business side of semiconductors by listing all of the major global players, as well as trends in semiconductor technology.


ST-8 Chromatography for Technical Translators
Matthew Schlecht
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Chromatography is a technique used for analysis and purification in many branches of the chemicals and life sciences industries, and is described in patents, manufacturing sheets, scholarly articles, and elsewhere. This session will offer a survey of chromatography (theory, equipment, applications, and results) as it is used in documents received for technical translation, with examples in several language pairs. Key aspects to be covered will include how chromatography works, where it is used, and how the methods, equipment, and results are described. Jargon and abbreviations will be decoded, and glossary information and resource links will be provided.


ST-9 Updating Your Knowledge of Science and Technology Innovations
Patricia Thickstun,  ,  ,  , and  
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Although the business of translation presents many demands on your time, updating your knowledge of innovations in science and technology is worthwhile and cost-effective. This session will provide strategies and resources for efficiently developing, expanding, and maintaining your science and technology knowledge base. Participants will learn how to increase their knowledge of the most recent innovations in science and technology and have fun doing it. Several examples of new and exciting innovations in science and technology will be presented from the fields of biotechnology, medicine, chemistry, and physics.


Science & Technology
Related Sessions

SEM-A Stylish Technical Writing: Make Yourself Stand Out

IT-2 The Influence of English on the Italian Language of Science and Technology

J-2 Automotive Translation and Interpreting

MED-4 Introduction to Neurosciences and Useful Links for Medical and Scientific Translators and Interpreters

S-4 Anatomy of a Material Safety Data Sheet

SL-2 Cut It Out: Improving Readability in Russian>English Technical Translations

TRM-3 Increasing Quality and Productivity: Using the Multilingual Resources of the European Union

Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

T-1 Revision: Necessary Evil or Added Value?
Jonathan Hine
(Thursday, 11:00am-12:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Every professional translation deserves to be checked by a second translator before delivery. This is called revision. Only an experienced translator can do this job, but many translators will not take revision assignments. Teachers or certification exam graders may seem suited to the work, but professional revision is not the same as grading papers or exams. An experienced reviser will define revision and contrast it with activities that look like it but are not (e.g., editing, copyediting, proofreading, grading, and evaluating). This session will include pointers on how to approach the revision task and how to price it.


T-2 Sushi, Kimchi, and Baklava: Lost and Found in Food Translation
Thei Zervaki
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Translators face a challenging task when translating food names, food ingredients, and signature national dishes. What are the translator's linguistic, cultural, and ethical choices and imperatives when it comes to the exciting topic of food translation? This session will compare a number of translation techniques for food terms and discuss the role of the source and target food culture in the translation process.


T-3 The Body: Your Most Overlooked Tool
Irene Radillo-Diaz
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

As professionals in the fields of translation, forensic transcription, and writing, we obsess frequently over the common tools of our trade: dictionaries, computers, and computer programs (word-processing programs, voice-recognition, machine translators, etc.). But we often forget the most critical tool in the equation: our bodies. This session will provide insight into the most common repetitive work injuries and problems that can result from the demands of our profession on our bodies. We will discuss postural problems, workstation ergonomics optimization through strategies or devices, how to prevent common painful conditions, and how to address them if already present.


T-4 Proofreading Refresher Course
Carolyn Yohn
(Friday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Refresh your translation proofreading skills to maintain or improve the quality of your work. We will look at the purpose and process of creating general and client-specific style sheets. The speaker will offer tried-and-true tips for proofreading, breaking down the quality control stage into manageable pieces that save you time without compromising your work. Participants will apply their skills to some fun, short practice pieces during the hour. This session is intended for translators of all skill levels.


T-5 Modal Mayhem
Joseph Mazza
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Why are English modal verbs so difficult to translate? What is implied by "shall" versus "should," "must" versus "will," or "may" versus "could?" How does negating a modal verb complicate the picture? Are modal verbs used differently in various parts of the English-speaking world? The head of the U.S. State Department's translation team (also a former English teacher!) will look at how modal verbs are used in a variety of text types (treaties, laws, contracts, etc.) and discuss trends and traps. Forget high school grammar classes—this session promises to be interactive and entertaining, and more practical than academic!


T-6 Internationalization and Localization for Translators
Diana Dudgeon and Rick Dudgeon
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In a rapidly shrinking world, globalization is the rule. What does this mean for experienced translators? What is the difference between translation and localization? Between localization and internationalization? And what does any of this have to do with globalization? Localization is not just about translating websites. The speakers will help you migrate from direct translation to the localization, not just of websites, but of software and the fast-growing app industry. The speakers will show you how to bid for localization projects properly without being underbid or biting off more than you can chew. Do not make the rookie mistake of just counting words.


T-7 What Every Advertising Translator Needs to Know
Evelyn Yang Garland and Grant Hamilton
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will provide an overview of advertising translation—what it requires and general guidelines on how to do it well. Several examples of Chinese>English and French>English advertising translation taken from the real world will be analyzed and discussed. Participants will gain hands-on experience in improving the translated advertising copy. Translators who do not work in Chinese or French will still be able to benefit from the discussions.


T-8 Software Localization Quality Assurance from a Tester's Perspective
Carola F. Berger
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will provide a very brief overview of the localization process for software and mobile apps before covering the quality assurance process in detail. In addition to discussing the fundamentals of the testing process, the speaker will also help you become a better tester by presenting some tips, tricks, best practices, and pitfalls. Intended for beginning and intermediate localization testers, the speaker will discuss the testing process from her perspective as a tester. The speaker will not cover other steps in the localization process, such as file preparation and translation.


T-9 CANCELLED
Political Correctness Is in the Eye of the Beholder
Nika Franchi
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




T-10 Pictures and Sound: Translating Television and Other Audiovisual Media
Sarah Lindholm
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English w/Japanese examples)

Audiovisual media present their own unique set of practical issues for the translator, because they involve not just text, not just visuals, and not just sound, but all three occurring together at a fixed pace. This session will explore the special challenges of translating television and film through the lens of Japanese anime. Attendees will learn how to recognize the most common problems, anticipate likely issues with individual projects, and implement strategies to overcome them or even turn them to advantage. Specific examples will come from Japanese, but the problems and strategies discussed will be applicable to all language combinations.


T-11 Crowd-Sourcing Translations at LinkedIn: Creating Meaningful Experience by Considering Users
Nani Ratnawati and Aline Kubiak
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English )

What is the Chinese translation for "LinkedIn," and why is it translated as such? How do we translate industry-specific phrases that may be foreign? Do we follow the standard or common way to translate certain terms, or do we dare to be different but more relevant? The answer to all of these questions is user experience. At LinkedIn, the staff asks users to create meaningful translation. The speaker will share translation decision-making processes in several specific languages that are used to build and provide relevant features for LinkedIn's international members.


T-12 Conquering the World of Content: How Translators Can Seize Opportunities in Content Marketing
Matt Baird
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Though not a completely new concept, "content marketing" has become quite the buzzword as companies now understand that traditional marketing is becoming less and less effective. It is an exploding area that also needs translators, editors, and copywriters. Using the example of his recent globetrotting ghost writer assignment, the speaker will explain just what this relatively new marketing technique is, what types of work are out there, and how translators can seize a variety of new—and potentially really fun—income opportunities. Although the focus will be on the German>English market, this session will be applicable to others as well.


T-13 The Adventurous World of the In-Country Review
Alicia Assini
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

So you have submitted your translation and the project is complete, but then you receive notice that there are some "reviews" that came back from the client's in-country team, or just an employee of the company who also "speaks" your language. Now you have to revise and justify your translation. The speaker will discuss some of the ways you might receive this feedback and provide suggestions for handling these situations.


T-14 NEW SESSION
The GILT Trip: From the Home Office to the Quality Assurance Desk
Yves Avérous
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Globalization (g11n), internationalization (i18n), localization (l10n), and transcreation are just other ways to say translation, but they also often imply working away from the comfort of the home office. Still, with a few extra skills, any good professional can make the switch from the home office to the quality assurance desk of a tech company. Besides opening a window on a world of new and lucrative opportunities, this session will provide detailed insights on these specializations and de-dramatize the world of technology translation, testing, and marketing.


Translation
Related Sessions

SEM-E Taking the Culture Hurdle: A Plea for More Courage in Translating

IT-3 Quality and Revision in Specialized English>Italian Translation

K-4 Wanna Play a Game? Practical Tips for Translators Collaborating on the Video Game Localization Process

MEL-6 Localizing Bidirectional Languages: Is This Right or Left?

MEL-7 Creating Arabic Subtitles

SL-7 The Visibility Dilemma: Translating Women's Job Titles

Translation & Interpreting Professions
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TIP-1 CANCELLED
Truth and Consequences: Confidentiality vs. Moral Imperative to Report and Right to Know
Betsy Benjaminson
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




TIP-2 Beyond the ATA Code of Ethics
Marian S. Greenfield, Charles Johnson, Rina Ne’eman, and Caitilin Walsh
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translators and interpreters often face ethical challenges in their daily work. Panelists will discuss and identify key decision-making principles and practices to apply when the ATA Code of Ethics and Professional Practice does not provide clear guidelines. The morality of confidentiality, specific situations that may cause translators/interpreters to consider breaching confidentiality, and appropriate reporting procedures will be discussed. The panel will also seek to identify best practices in situations where maintaining confidentiality is called into question.


TIP-3 Documenting Genocide: Translating History to Raise Awareness for the Future
Lee Martin
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

In August 2013, the Kurdistan Regional Government contracted with a company to translate previously classified Iraqi military documents detailing the Halabja Chemical Attack of 1988. The attack was part of the multi-phased Kurdish genocide that resulted in the deaths of over 5,000 Kurds in Halabja and over 180,000 Kurds nationwide. The speaker will discuss the unique challenges that arose from dealing with international governments, working with Iraq-based legal experts, translating governmental military documentation, and assisting the Kurdistan Regional Government in having the Kurdish genocide recognized by governments worldwide.


TIP-4 ASTM International Standards for Interpreting and Translation
Amanda Curry and Monique Roske
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

ASTM International, previously known as the American Society for Testing and Materials, is one of the largest developers of standards worldwide. In response to the rapid expansion of the language services industry in recent years, ASTM Technical Committee F43 has established standards to uphold the quality of language products and services. As chairs of the F43 Language Interpreting and Language Translation Subcommittees, the speakers will discuss revisions to the existing standards, with particular emphasis on the needs analysis and specifications essential to quality interpreting and translation. This session will be of interest to both language services providers and independent professionals.


TIP-5 Recent Developments in Translation-Related ISO Standards: Impact on Translators and Language Services Providers
Alan Melby, William Rivers, David Rumsey, and Peter Reynolds
(Friday, 11:30am-12:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The new standard ISO 17100 (based on EN 15038) will be in final editing by November. ASTM F2575 is also being revised. The speaker will explain how these standards were developed and how they will affect translators and language services providers in particular. Other ISO standards that are currently being discussed regarding interpreting (ISO 18841) and terminology (TBX) will be addressed, as well as other standards focusing on quality assessment (MQM and DQF).


TIP-6 Why We Need to Become Good Storytellers
Jost Zetzsche
(Friday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

There has never been a time when translation providers have been more diverse in the products they are offering. What you offer has very little to do with what your colleague (aka "competitor") offers. And this does not only refer to differences in language combinations and directions. Our products are shaped by the technologies and processes we use, by the translation philosophies and ethical standards we hold dear, by how we view ourselves as translators, and by—ultimately—human beings. The speaker will show how participants can package all of this into stories that can create a meaningful way to engage with clients.


TIP-7 The Next Wave: Curation, Mass Personalization, and Spoken Translation
Renato Beninatto
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Scan the program of any industry event and you will see variations on the same topics: machine translation, crowdsourcing, revolutionary technology, platforms, and content management. But what are the new topics that we will be talking about in the next few years? This session will attempt to bring up new subjects that will make you sound smarter than everybody else. Learn why content curation, mass personalization, and spoken translation have a significant impact on the development of the language business.


TIP-8 Why Raising the Bar on Your Own Translation Quality Is About to Get Deadly Serious
Chris Durban, Kevin Hendzel, and David Jemielity
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The translation market has long since split into the bulk sector of fast turnarounds and low quality, and the premium sector of exceptional writers and genuine subject-matter experts. Where do you want to be when the "good enough" customers discover how "good enough" machine translation is getting? The premium sector is the solution. Today, too many translators are faking it, unaware that their work is only superficially specialized. Too much work is middling to fair, mired in clumsy writing. An expert panel will examine what is really required to succeed at the high end and suggest strategies to raise the bar all around.


TIP-9 Embrace the Change: Top Trends that will Define the Future of the Translation Profession
Nataly Kelly and Jack Welde
(Saturday, 11:30am-12:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

New technologies are changing the role of the professional translator. In this session, you will learn about important developments in the translation market, including: venture funding's impact on technology, how cloud computing eliminates investment in computer-assisted translation tools, why increased end-client empowerment drives transparency, how "in-context" translation tools speed up translation and boost quality, how new technologies eliminate "price per word" compensation, as well as the automation of project and vendor management services and the impact of "crowdsourced translation." These changes are here. Come learn why you should embrace them.


TIP-10 Work Behavior Distinctions between In-House Translators and Freelancers
Mónica Rodríguez-Castro
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Are in-house translators more satisfied than freelancers? The differences between the job of the in-house translator (or contractor) and the freelancer translator (or subcontractor) will be investigated during this session. Based on empirical data collected from an online questionnaire, this session will highlight the main sources of dissatisfaction that are reported widely by translation professionals. Some concerns from the current subcontracting model will also be discussed, and potential solutions to reduce high levels of turnover will be suggested. This session aims to reach out to language services providers in order to initiate a discussion on the currently predominant hiring models.


TIP-11 Profiling the New Generation of Translators
Rafa Lombardino
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Based on four years of observation teaching "Tools & Technology in Translation" as part of the English/Spanish Translation Certificate Program at the University of California, San Diego Extension, the speaker will discuss the profile of a new generation of translators joining the industry in the digital era. Attention will be paid to how newcomers see the role of professional translators, what their expectations are regarding the current market, what knowledge they seek to acquire, how familiar they are with computer-assisted translation tools, and how comfortable they feel when it comes to marketing their services online and offline.


TIP-12 Mind Full or Mindful: Five Ways to Wellbeing for Translators and Interpreters
Sabina Metcalf
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Mindfulness is a concept that emerged in recent years and encompasses paying conscious attention to our internal and external experiences. This presentation teaches translators and interpreters to practice mindfulness based on the research developed by the UK government’s Foresight Project on Mental Capital and Wellbeing. The speaker will share specific examples developed throughout her extensive career as a linguist and having survived a four-year battle with depression. The goal of this presentation is to help fellow translators and interpreters better understand who they are, create clear goals, and focus on their professional and personal fulfillment.


Translation & Interpreting Professions
Related Sessions

I-6 Blaze a Trail of Fire: New International Standards for Interpreting

Terminology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TRM-1 Terminology Management: A Panel Discussion on Practical Issues by and for Freelancers, Language Services Providers, Companies, and Educators
Barbara Inge Karsch
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Many issues in translation projects could be avoided if terminology was managed. Yet, very few projects include a deliberate approach to handle terminology. Translators, end clients, and project managers have many open questions regarding terminology management skills, tools, and processes, and many of the existing best practices are not well known. A panel of experts will provide answers to some of these issues, including how to manage a project and charge for a terminology project, the role of the end client, and how to prepare translators for terminology work. Please bring additional questions.


TRM-2 Innovative, Illogical, and Irreverent Search Techniques
Jenn Mercer
(Saturday, 2:30pm-3:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The Internet puts so much information at our fingertips that it can be tempting to believe that we have found it all, but there is even more information just beyond our grasp. This session will share techniques for going beyond the basic search. We will explore advanced searches, different search engines and various ways of using these search engines, as well as software to optimize the search.


TRM-3 Increasing Quality and Productivity: Using the Multilingual Resources of the European Union
Silvia D'Amico
(Saturday, 4:00pm-5:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Have you ever come across a term in a technical or financial text you could not find in your target language? With 24 official languages, the European Union has developed excellent inter-institutional resources that can prove invaluable for translators working in any field. Being able to retrieve official documents and extract approved terminology is key when translating high-profile financial, legal, or medical texts. We will discuss the resources available and their features, explain how to navigate them effectively, and outline how to quicken the research process.



Terminology
Related Sessions

SEM-G Stairway to Equivalence: The Translator as Terminologist

   
   
K-2 Military/Defense-Related Translation/Terminology Involving Korean

   
   
LT-4 Xbench for Terminology Management and Translation Quality Assurance

   
   
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