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•  SESSIONS BY LANGUAGE
•  SESSIONS BY SPECIALIZATION
•  SESSION SCHEDULE
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A Arabic C Chinese F French
G German IT Italian J Japanese
K Korean N Nordic Languages P Portuguese
S Spanish SL Slavic Languages




Arabic
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


A-1 Common Issues in Arabic>English Translation
Louay Abdulla
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Arabic)

The vast differences between Arabic and English are most clear when translating from Arabic into English. Differences in grammar, syntax, morphology, and sentence structure render some Arabic translations difficult to read in English. Over the years, the speaker has noticed certain common issues in the work of translators whose native language is Arabic, despite their near-native abilities in English. This session will identify and examine some of these issues. Attendees will have the opportunity to share their own experiences.


A-2 Unraveling Awful Arabic Sentences
Rania Hijazeen | Jackie Murgida
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Arabic)

Arabic-into-English translators often face the problem of wrangling long, convoluted Arabic sentences into acceptable English structures, rather than stilted and awkward "translationese." In this hands-on workshop, participants will learn and practice a methodology for analyzing complex Arabic sentences and then deciding how to express the same meanings and relationships in clear and idiomatic English.


A-3 Court Interpreting and Legal Terminology for Arabic Interpreters
Amine El Fajri
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English and Arabic)

In this session, attendees will be introduced to court interpreting and will learn some legal terms commonly used during criminal court proceedings, their meanings, and target-language renditions. Throughout this session, examples will be given in Arabic and a glossary of terms will be used.


A-4 CANCELLED
Methods of Creating and Introducing New Terms in Arabic
Ramadan Elmgrab
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




Arabic
Related Sessions

L-3 Trials and Tribulations of Translated Literature from the Margins

L-7 The Translator as Author

 
 

Chinese
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


C-1 Translate Creatively: What Would Steve Jobs Do?
Evelyn Yang Garland
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Need to come up with a creative translation for a name? The speaker will lead an excursion through time, showing what history's most creative people thought it would take to be creative. Using Steve Jobs as a modern-day paragon of creativity, attendees will learn techniques to boost their level of creativity in translation. Examples will be presented in English and Chinese (both directions), followed by interactive activities.


C-2 English Translation of Classical Chinese Poems: Technical Issues and Implications
Zhesheng Cheng
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will analyze different versions of English translations of classical Chinese poems. Topics will include units of translation, changes in parts of speech, the addition of language elements, and the importance of conjunctions and prepositions. These elements are intricately associated with various chronic technical challenges faced by Chinese>English translators in their attempts to bridge two drastically different language terrains, each with its own unique cultural and linguistic “topographic” features.


C-3 Translation: The Building Block for Interpreting (or Vice Versa)
Pency Tsai | Di Wu
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Beginner; Presented in: English and Mandarin)

The panelists will examine the many ways in which the practices of translation and interpreting interact and support each other. Chinese interpreters will discuss the difficult (and often funny) situations they have faced during assignments and how they handled them. This session will offer tips and take-away techniques for entry-level interpreters and translators.


Chinese
Related Sessions

L-2 Beware of the Fallible Filter and Unreliable Narrator: Enhancing Professional Trust

 
 

French
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F-1 Finding Free Online French Resources
Gay Rawson
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and French)

This session will explore free online resources, such as dictionaries, specialized databases, glossaries of acronyms, and Francophone news agencies. Attendees will also be invited to share the online resources they use. Attendees will leave with a handout detailing different sites, including a critique of their strengths and weaknesses. Attendees will also be given access to an online forum containing links to these resources.


F-2 Gallicisms of Structure
Grant Hamilton
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

English and French have many words that look alike but whose meanings do not overlap precisely. Good translators learn to identify them and avoid the traps. This session, however, seeks to go one step further by identifying structures that are fundamentally French and that can make your English translation sound odd if left unchanged. Using examples from actual jobs, the speaker will identify how you can make the copy flow more naturally in English. Although many of the concepts discussed will be quite advanced, this session will be suitable for all levels.


F-3 Translating French Initial Public Offerings and Other Securities Offerings
Jennifer Bader
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Prospectuses for initial public offerings (IPOs) and other securities offerings raise challenges even for experienced translators. A French prospectus is drafted pursuant to French laws and regulations, but its English translation may have to comply with certain laws in English-speaking jurisdictions. The translator must be sensitive to differences in substance and style. This session will summarize the regulatory framework of the French and U.S. securities markets, provide an overview of the IPO process, and examine some of the issues that arise in translating IPO prospectuses.


F-4 CANCELLED
Le role des emprunts dans la traduction
Adetola Oye
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: French)




F-5 One Size Doesn't Fit All
Grant Hamilton
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What distinguishes run-of-the-mill translations from remarkable ones? It’s often a matter of style and vocabulary. We’ll be working on both in this session designed to expand your toolkit of solutions and put an end to knee-jerk translations that impoverish your writing style.


F-6 Translating for Global Health
Michèle Hansen | Jean-Marc Poisson
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English and French)

Health is a major focus of international assistance programs, and the large number of francophone countries in the developing world means there is a demand for French<>English translators. This session will illuminate the broad range of topics involved in translating for this field, which includes issues generally outside of traditional “medical translation,” such as migration, climate change, education, and governance. We will tackle terminology, stylistic considerations, and concepts that may not exist across cultures. Attendees will leave with resources so they can pursue additional training on their own.


F-7 NEW SESSION
May Cause Dizziness: What French<>English Translators Should Know About Drug Delivery and Formulation
Michèle Hansen
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and French)

Pharmaceutical innovations may improve our health, but they also create new concepts and terminology that give translators headaches. This session will explore the hows and whys of one fast-changing area, including an overview of dosage forms, delivery systems, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, bioequivalence, and some troublesome terminology in French and English.


French
Related Sessions

SEM-E Source-Language Cultural Literacy for French>English Translators

L-4 Measuring a Translation's Success: The Example of Thomas Piketty's Capital in the 21st Century

L-5 Translating an Alternative to Tocqueville

L-7 The Translator as Author

MED-2 Introduction to Veterinary Translation

MED-3 Different Types of Catheterization: Uses, Indications, and Catheter Types

ST-3 How to Read and Translate Risk and Safety Vernacular Phrases in Technical Texts

 
 

German
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


G-1 Deutsche Rechtschreibung: Was bleibt nach den Reformen?
Lisa Walgenbach
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: German)

Die Orthografiereform ist am 1. August 1998 in Deutschland, Österreich, der Schweiz und fünf weiteren europäischen Ländern in Kraft getreten, in denen Deutsch als eine der Amtssprachen fungiert. Es scheint der Aufmerksamkeit vieler Schreibender entgangen zu sein, dass das neue Regelwerk der deutschen Rechtschreibung seither dreimal modifiziert und im Jahre 2007 in einer völlig überarbeiteten Fassung verbindlich eingeführt wurde. Die Seminarteilnehmer erfahren, welche Fassung des Regelwerkes nunmehr verbindlich in Kraft getreten ist. Die Regeln entfallen auf die Bereiche: Worttrennung, Zeichensetzung, Laut-Buchstaben-Zuordnung, Getrennt- und Zusammenschreibung, und Groß- und Kleinschreibung.


G-2 CANCELLED
The Real Meanings of German Idiomatic Phrases
Alice Frontzek
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: German)




G-3 Sex and Crime in English and German
Jeannette Bauroth
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translating genre fiction such mysteries and romance novels presents numerous challenges. Aside from the pesky issue of “Sie” and “du,” cultural references have to be adapted carefully. Do the same pranks work in both languages? Is a coroner equivalent to a Gerichtsmediziner? Did you know that romantic scenes also have to be adapted? This session will present multiple examples from English>German book translations. Attendees will be encouraged to share their own suggestions and solutions.


G-4 Die Leiden des steuerlichen Wertes: A Primer on Translating German Tax Texts
Ted Wozniak
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English and German)

This session will explore the basis for German taxation, tax concepts, and methods that are "foreign" to U.S. taxpayers. It will also introduce the most common tax terminology encountered in German>English tax translations. Individual taxation, primarily the German Income Tax Act, will be covered, but the emphasis will be on business taxation. Topics will include an overview of the relevant tax laws and taxation authorities, the various tax types, and terminology. Special attention will be given to the proper into-English translation of terms related to taxation concepts or calculation methods that are not used in the American system.


G-5 Ticken die Deutschen anders? Understanding the Idiosyncrasies of Doing Business in Germany
Tatjana Dujmic | Karen Rückert
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Do you work with direct clients in Germany? Are you familiar with the country’s business and legal framework? Did you know, for instance, that it’s illegal to send marketing e-mail to businesses in Germany without their consent? This session will be especially pertinent to anyone thinking of marketing to German businesses. The speakers will explain the implications of the EU Opt-In Directive, outline best acquisition and business practices, and share their industry and freelance experience of what German business clients expect.


G-6 NEW SESSION
Financial-Legal Weasel Words Revisited: An Interactive Discussion and Analysis for German>English Translators
Robin Bonthrone
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and German)

“Weasel words” refer to a continuously expanding collection of German financial and financial-legal terms that habitually pose problems for translators. These terms can pose problems because of a combination of any or all of the following: they're difficult to disambiguate, even in context; have traditionally been mistranslated, including in many dictionaries; are misused by non-native financial and legal professionals; or because they actually look like English when they’re not. This session will offer an overview of some of the most common weasel words, and participants will be encouraged to ask questions.


German
Related Sessions

SEM-A Efficient Proofreading for German Translators

L-7 The Translator as Author

MED-3 Different Types of Catheterization: Uses, Indications, and Catheter Types

ST-3 How to Read and Translate Risk and Safety Vernacular Phrases in Technical Texts

T-10 Roads Less Taken

 
 

Italian
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


IT-1 Cultural Competencies in Globalization
Licia Corbolante
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Italian)

Culture has different manifestations, most of them implicit and subjective, which can affect the way software and online products and services are perceived on a global market. Models of culture and best practices, such as standardization and localizability reviews, can provide a useful framework for gaining a better understanding of how culture affects the way information is perceived, processed, and interpreted. This session will focus on language, content, and visual items from an English>Italian perspective. It will also include examples of English as a second language and introduce the role of a cultural specialist.


IT-2 Beyond Terminology Collections: Best Practices in Information Technology Terminology Work
Licia Corbolante
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: Italian)

Terminology related to information technology is extremely varied and changing constantly. The distinct language ecosystems contributing to this are mirrored by the co-existence of heterogeneous trends and methods of term formation in English. These trends also require equally flexible strategies in Italian, as different cognitive, pragmatic, sociological, economic, and diachronic aspects need to be taken into account. This session will review the challenges associated with terminology work, including the reliability of existing resources. The best practices discussed can be applied to other domains.


IT-3 CANCELLED
Financial Blogs: It’s a Whole New Ball Game
Francesca Marchei
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Italian)




IT-4 Corpora in Translation Practice: An Invaluable Resource for Translators
Adriana Di Biase
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

There has been an increased interest in corpora in language and translation studies. However, the benefits of corpora use in the practice of translation are often underestimated and underrated. The speaker will discuss major theoretical aspects of corpora. She will examine practical examples of the different types of analysis that can be performed through the use of corpora in Italian>English translation. The session will also explore the major tools available online, both monolingual and bilingual, and their application in a translation project.


Italian
Related Sessions

T-10 Roads Less Taken

 
 

Japanese
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


J-1 Translating Racially Sensitive Passages and Other Minefields
Juliet Carpenter
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

A Japanese woman finds Americans as attractive "as if they had stepped out of a Nazi propaganda film." A Japanese girl living in the U.S. is delighted to have her friends set her up on a blind date, but is shocked when her date turns out to be Korean. Even a nuanced discussion of race can require recasting in translation; the issues are still smoldering and require care in handling. The speaker will discuss the adjustments that she and author Minae Mizumura collaborated on to render such passages in a non-offensive, clear, and hopefully illuminating way.


J-2 Two Roads Diverged: Making Good Choices in Japanese>English Translation
James Davis
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

A "good" translation results from a series of "good" choices, but how does the translator know which choice is the "right" choice, the "best available" choice, or even a "good" choice? The speaker will present guidelines for making good choices in Japanese>English translation and will discuss examples to illustrate their use.


J-3 Deposition Interpreting Workshop
Izumi Suzuki
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Japanese)

The speaker will first explain what a deposition is and how it is different from court interpreting. Attendees will then be invited to take part in a role-playing exercise involving a deposition scenario in which volunteers will try to interpret for attorneys and a deponent. Attendees will learn about the ethics and responsibilities of an interpreter in a deposition, as well as necessary vocabulary and expressions that are often used.


J-4 Challenges of Literary Translation: Finding Your Voice
Juliet Carpenter
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translators hear voices. We hear them in one language and recreate them in another. What changes are necessary to keep these voices vital and real? How does the translator inhabit the character to find the right voice? This session, based on the speaker’s four decades as a literary Japanese>English translator, will examine such questions and provide examples of ways to find the right voice. Examples will be drawn from some of the speaker’s most recent works, including Minae Mizumura's prize-winning novel A True Novel.


J-5 Japanese<>English Certification Workshop
Ihaya Manako | David Newby | Satoko Nielsen | Miyako Okamoto | Connie Prenner | Akiko Sasaki-Summers | Izumi Suzuki
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Japanese)

This session will answer questions regarding ATA's certification exam by providing a brief overview of the certification process, testing procedures, and grading standards. Attendees will complete translations of a Japanese or English passage that is similar to the general passage on ATA's certification exam and receive feedback from graders using the grading tools and standards for the exam. To receive the full benefit from this session, attendees will need to translate a sample passage in advance. Please contact David Newby (dave@eigo.us) or Miyo Tat (miyot@comcast.net) prior to the conference for a passage.


J-6 CANCELLED
Improving Translation Speed and Fluency with Sight Translation
Tanya Pound
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Japanese)




J-7 Skills and Strategies for Deciphering Handwritten Japanese Documents
Yoshihiro Mochizuki | Mariko Okada
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Japanese)

Japanese>English translation becomes more complicated and challenging when translators need to translate handwritten Japanese documents, particularly older documents in which text is written in the cursive style known as kuzushi-ji. Contemporary handwritten documents (e.g., personal letters) are also often a challenge. This session will provide a brief introduction to Japanese cursive writing, along with hands-on training in the skills needed to read Japanese handwritten material, including kuzushi-ji and hentai-gana. The speakers will also introduce references and additional training material so that attendees can continue their training.


J-8 NEW SESSION
Japanese Interpreters Panel
Nadine Edwards
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: Japanese)

This session will feature a panel of experienced interpreters that will share how they became interpreters as well as interesting anecdotes from the field. Panelists will include Paul Koehler, James Patrick, Izumi Suzuki, and Hiro Tsuchiya. Please bring many questions and be ready for a lively discussion!


Japanese
Related Sessions

ST-3 How to Read and Translate Risk and Safety Vernacular Phrases in Technical Texts

T-10 Roads Less Taken

 
 

Korean
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


K-1 Conference Interpreting Explained: Challenges, Strategies, and Skills (English>Korean)
Miryoung Sohn
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: Korean)

English>Korean conference interpreters face unique challenges due to the linguistic and cultural differences between English and Korean and the diversity of English-speaking countries. Moreover, the widespread use of video conferencing has introduced a series of new challenges for conference interpreters. Based on her experience as a professional conference interpreter and an institutional trainer for more than 20 years, the speaker will discuss/analyze these challenges and suggest a number of critical strategies using a rich array of real-life examples.


K-2 How to Prepare English>Korean Medical Translations
Peter Yoon
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Korean)

New drugs, medical devices, and developments in biotechnology have increased the demand for medical translation. Medical translation requires a strong command of terminology and accurate translation skills. Translators who have no medical background need special preparation to expand their repertoire of medical terminology in both Korean and English. This session will explain various aspects of medical translation, including clinical protocols, medical devices, and patent applications, and provide useful resources for medical terminology. The role of the new Korean Ministry of Food and Drug Safety and the requirements for back translation will also be discussed.


K-3 Naturalizing English Translations from Korean
Paul B. Gallagher | Sarah McWatters
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Korean)

Subtitlers of Korean dramas work quickly and are prone to source-language interference, which can result in unnatural or incorrect English translations. Based on realistic examples, the speaker will explore common translation traps, identifying patterns and appropriate lexical, syntactic, and pragmatic (cross-cultural) solutions. Participation will be encouraged.


K-4 Pharmaceutical Clinical Study: Fundamentals of Korean>English Translation
Carl Sullivan
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The pharmaceutical clinical study-related translation genre makes up a considerable portion of high-demand Korean>English jobs. Drawing on years of work and using the latest reference material, basic terminology and sample clinical trial drug-related translations will be discussed. The information presented in this session will serve as a great start for someone interested in approaching this genre, or as a refresher for those more advanced.


 
 

Nordic Languages
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


N-1 Translating Norwegian Legal Texts
John Richard Stokbak Sciaba
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This speaker will provide an overview of the Norwegian legal system and discuss some common problems when translating Norwegian legal texts into English and other languages. Topics will include the use of impersonal constructions, some common legal concepts, and false friends.


N-2 Compassion Fatigue: Risk Factors and Prevention for Interpreters
John Richard Stokbak Sciaba
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreters, especially community interpreters, may fall victim to compassion fatigue. What are the most important risk factors and how can they be avoided? The speaker will draw on both literature and some of his personal experiences, including interpreting for a Norwegian terrorist trial and other court cases involving heinous crimes, as well as health sector interpreting. Survival strategies will be presented.


 
 

Portuguese
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


P-1 The Role of Translation and Interpreting in United Nations Peace Missions
Israel Souza Júnior
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Brazil is a significant participant in international relations due to its successful history of participation in United Nations peacekeeping missions. Over the last 67 years, Brazilian soldiers have been to the Balkans, Suez, Mozambique, Angola, East Timor, and Haiti. But it was in the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti, created in 2004, when it became officially necessary to provide translation and interpreting services for the Brazilian contingent in the theater of operations. Attendees will gain a better understanding of the present role of military translators and interpreters supporting the peace process worldwide.


P-2 Tough Guys also Translate: United Nations Peace Mission in Haiti
Israel Souza Júnior
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Brazilian soldiers are deployed abroad to support the United Nations with dispute settlements. Translators and interpreters are working with the Brazilian Battalion and the Brazilian Engineering Company, both deployed in the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti. The speaker will discuss the challenges faced by interpreters and translators currently in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.


P-3 ANACpedia: Online Dictionaries for Aviation Terminology in Portuguese, English, and Spanish
Fernanda Silva
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Portuguese)

ANACpedia, composed of Portuguese, English, and Spanish dictionaries, is designed to make aviation terminology available. The use of systems to analyze term concordance, frequency of occurrence, and representative corpus will be discussed. The establishment of conceptual relationships, the selection of textual proofs, and the development of an English>Spanish dictionary and a database composed of acronyms in Portuguese will also be covered.


P-4 An Overview of the Interpreting Profession
Giovanna Lester
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: Brazilian Portuguese)

This session will offer an introduction to interpreting and the principles that govern the profession and the market in general. The speaker will touch on the history of the profession in Brazil. Find out where interpreting is used, the methods and tools available to interpreters, how technology has affected and will continue to affect the profession, and the rights and responsibilities of interpreters. This session should help individuals who are interested in the profession to better evaluate their skills.


P-5 Commas, Parentheses, and Ellipses: Where They Go and How They Work
Amanda Morris
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Friday 11:15am to Friday 2:00pm

A well-placed comma can change everything! Proper punctuation is the worker bee of good writing, but it can also sting. In this session, we’ll discuss basic punctuation and capitalization rules, how they interact with each other, and the usage differences between Brazilian Portuguese and American English.


P-6 Portuguese<>English Contract Terminology and Concepts, Part II
Naomi Sutcliffe de Moraes | Marsel de Souza
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Portuguese)

CHANGE: Moved from Friday 2:00pm to Friday 11:15am

The speaker will walk attendees through some difficult terminology and concepts associated with contract law and offer tips on how to translate them. Stylistic issues will also be covered. Brazilian, U.S., and U.K. terminology will be included. This will be a continuation of the session given in Chicago in 2014, not a repetition.


P-7 "Hardening" Your Information Technology Translation
Maria Helena Brenner-Kelly
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: Portuguese)

"Hardening" is just one of the new buzz words from the information technology (IT) industry, and every year the industry coins dozens of them. Even the non-specialized translator needs to come up with terms that are not only accurate, but short, elegant, and exciting. After researching trends and directions from major thought leaders in the IT industry, the speaker compiled a list of terms that will soon be challenging translators. Using examples in Portuguese, she will discuss the meaning of these new terms and the best translation strategies.


P-8 Are You an Engaged Pivot?
Érika Lessa
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: Portuguese)

Should interpreters work differently depending on the role they play at a conference? After being trained in a multi-language environment and having worked with other pivot interpreters, the speaker will discuss a few techniques every interpreter should keep in mind while being the second source of a speech.


P-9 Brazilian Tax Law: Understanding and Translating This Alphabet Soup
Manuela Sampaio
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Portuguese)

The alphabet soup that makes up the Brazilian tax system, including the resulting tax notices, can be quite overwhelming for foreign companies operating in Brazil. As translators, we must aid our clients in their understanding of these taxes, contributions, and forms so that they can report back to their head offices. This session will provide an overview of the Brazilian tax system, including some of the main taxes and how a federal tax delinquency notice is processed. The goal is to discuss basic concepts that will help translators when dealing with Brazilian tax documents.


P-10 Making Financese and Economese Sing
João Vicente de Paulo Júnior
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Portuguese)

Did the latest financial crisis leave you facing weakening prospects? Did the second-round effects of the economic slowdown wreak havoc on your bottom line? The language of international financial institutions can seem convoluted and even impenetrable. The speaker will discuss simple, yet effective solutions for the translation of financial terms. You’ll realize that you can make your translations more natural and reader-friendly, as well as credible in the eyes of specialists.


Portuguese
Related Sessions

MED-5 Interpreting for Patients with HIV/AIDS: Sharing Experiences and Educational Concepts

T-10 Roads Less Taken

 
 

Spanish
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


S-1 "Yes, I Touched Her Down There": Interpreting for Victims and Sex Offenders
Alvaro Vergara-Mery
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Attendees will be invited to participate in various scenarios that delineate the difficult task of interpreting for victims of sexual abuse and sex offenders. This session will help experienced interpreters apply effective techniques (from specific terminology to emotional reactions) to cope with the raw nature of these encounters, maintain accuracy, and preserve impartiality and the clinical importance of the session. This is an advanced-level training with examples in English and Spanish.


S-2 A Review on the Spanish Royal Academy’s Newest Rules and Recommendations for Punctuation and Orthography
Deborah Wexler
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

When translating into Spanish, we are faced with punctuation and orthography differences between the source language and Spanish that can lead to text errors. This session will guide you in making the correct choices, whether you are a novice or veteran translator. The speaker will cover mandatory and incorrect commas, appropriate punctuation with numbers and symbols, changes in diacritical and monosyllable accentuation, and the correct usage of prefixes, double vowels, and capitalization.


S-3 Manual de dialectología hispánica: castellano versus español
Andre Moskowitz
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: Spanish)

How do you say “Spanish” in Spanish? Español, castellano, or both terms? While most languages have only one name in the respective language, Spanish happens to have two. However, Spanish speakers from different regions have varying opinions regarding these terms. We will address the age-old topic of español versus castellano from a Spanish dialectology perspective. Which name do Spanish speakers from different countries/regions prefer and why? The Academy’s official position regarding the two terms will also be held up to the light of public scrutiny and compared against the views of Spanish speakers from different regions.


S-4 Intimate and Impersonal in Translation
Romina Marazzato Sparano
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Using case grammar, a system of linguistic analysis based on verb arguments and their realization, and verb typology, this session will provide a guide to working with transitive, unaccusative, and unergative verbs. The distinction between passive (“Se venden flores/Se las vende”) and impersonal (“Se vende casa”) constructions will be redefined, shedding light on apparently incongruent agreement patterns.


S-5 Preparing for the English<>Spanish ATA Certification Exam, Part I
Rudy Heller | Jane Maier | Holly Mikkelson | Mercedes de la Rosa Sherman
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

This session will prepare attendees for the English>Spanish and Spanish>English certification exams. ATA graders will provide an overview of ATA’s Certification Program and processes and describe the structure of the exam, criteria for marking errors and assigning points, and what graders expect of candidates. Attendees will then be grouped according to their language combination (English>Spanish or Spanish>English), and the previous year's exam passages will be reviewed in detail. Common errors will be pointed out and good renditions will be explained. This session is intended for both novice and experienced translators.


S-6 Preparing for the English>Spanish ATA Certification Exam, Part II
Rudy Heller | Mercedes de la Rosa Sherman
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Attendees are encouraged to attend the first part of this presentation "S-5: Preparing for the English<>Spanish ATA Certification Exam, Part I." In the second hour, English>Spanish passages will be reviewed in detail, common errors will be pointed out, and good renditions will be explained. This workshop is addressed to novice and experienced translators alike.


S-7 Preparing for the Spanish>English ATA Certification Exam, Part II
Jane Maier | Holly Mikkelson
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Attendees are encouraged to attend the first part of this presentation "S-5: Preparing for the English<>Spanish ATA Certification Exam, Part I." In the second hour, Spanish>English passages will be reviewed in detail, common errors will be pointed out, and good renditions will be explained. This workshop is addressed to novice and experienced translators alike.


S-8 CANCELLED
How to Understand and Translate Corruption Crimes
Mirtha Federico
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Spanish)




S-9 Technical Translation and Interpreting for International Organizations
Daniel Tamayo
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Advanced; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Multilingualism is a core principle of major international organizations. Translating or interpreting the material these organizations produce is crucial to their operation. The speaker will discuss practical solutions to major translation and interpreting challenges that translators and interpreters face in this highly specialized field. Attendees will have a chance to translate technical texts from organizations that operate within the United Nations framework.


S-10 Considerations for Translating Contracts and Notarial Instruments
Andrew Tucker
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Translators working with Mexican legal documents often experience terminology issues due to differences between the U.S. and Mexican legal systems. This presentation addresses several common problems encountered when translating Mexican contracts and notarial instruments into U.S. English for both Mexican and American clients. Useful sources will be discussed, including contract style guides, boilerplate clause websites, and U.S. and Mexican legislation governing different types of notaries.


S-11 The Scientifically Approved Term Is Not Always the Best Option: The Challenges of Translating at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Alex Alvarez | Claudia Díaz-Kukucka
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English and Spanish)

As a federal agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) must maintain its reputation as a trustworthy institution delivering credible information. When it comes to translating health information into non-English languages, the challenges are many. Sometimes tough decisions must be made when it comes to terminology. This session will focus on the challenge of choosing between using scientific jargon and employing terms that are more familiar to the public. The speakers will present specific terminology challenges, lessons learned, and invite attendees to share their experiences.


S-12 Similarities and Differences between IFRS and USGAAP: The Importance of Being Financially Bilingual
Adolfo Cunyas Zuranich
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Spanish)

This session is designed to alert English>Spanish translators and companies to the major differences between International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The speaker will discuss the importance of being financially bilingual in the U.S. capital markets, despite the fact that the future adoption of IFRS for public companies in the U.S. remains uncertain. The potential impact of these differences to translators of financial statements (English<>Spanish) will also be discussed.


S-13 "I Haven't Had My Sex Reassignment Surgery Yet": Interpreting for Gender-Non-Conforming Patients
Alvaro Vergara-Mery
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Interpreting for gender non-conforming patients presents significant challenges, especially in languages like Spanish where words have a gender. Medical interpreters will learn to use special techniques and interventions to convey the original meaning in its full sense so that the clinical importance of the session is preserved. This session will include real-life scenarios that address the difficulties of finding specific and appropriate terminology applicable to this population. The importance of remaining sensitive to the patient's gender identity will also be addressed. This is an advanced-level training with examples in English and Spanish.


S-14 Issues in Recorded Media Translations of Colombian Spanish
Anthony Rivas
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English and Spanish)

What are the issues involved with interpreting for monolingual Spanish-speaking Colombians in legal proceedings? Colombian Spanish includes 12 different dialects, each with specific lexical, usage, syntactic, and phonological variants. This session will examine Colombian Spanish terms and phrases that may lead to mistakes when interpreting in court or when dealing with recorded media transcription and translation.


S-15 CANCELLED
Public Health and Social Media
Eva De Vallescar
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Spanish)




S-16 Improving Translation and Interpreting Services in School Districts
Monica Villalobos
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: Spanish)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday 3:30pm to Thursday 3:30pm

This session will highlight the roles of translators and interpreters in the schools, along with the importance of qualified staff. Other topics will include the steps and techniques for delivering professional interpreting/translation, avoiding grammatical, spelling, and syntactical errors, and an overview of the interpreting process during special education meetings. The interpreter’s code of ethics will also be reviewed. We will also discuss cultural differences and offer solutions, approaches, and a common ground to better serve bilingual and English as a second language students and parents.


S-17 ¡La gramática no muerde
Yilda Amparo Ruiz Monroy
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: Spanish)

¡La gramática puede ser absolutamente fascinante! ¡Puede ser divertida, emocionante e incluso estimulante! Aunque muchos la aborrecen, la pasan por alto o reniegan de ella, todos sabemos que es fundamental para los profesionales del idioma. En realidad, a menudo constituye la diferencia entre un traductor “bueno” y un traductor “excelente”. Este seminario le mostrará cómo hacer de la gramática su mejor amiga. Ofreceremos sencillos trucos, ejercicios y perspectivas para impedir, detectar y corregir en forma amena errores gramaticales comunes, y otros no tan comunes. ¡Ésta será una experiencia llena de vida!


Spanish
Related Sessions

SEM-B Self-Editing for Spanish Translators

SEM-F Sight Translation for Translators

ET-4 New Approaches in Directionality for Teaching Long Consecutive

I-9 Boost Your B Language Fluency

L-7 The Translator as Author

LAW-1 Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts, Part I

LAW-5 Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts, Part II

MED-2 Introduction to Veterinary Translation

MED-3 Different Types of Catheterization: Uses, Indications, and Catheter Types

MED-5 Interpreting for Patients with HIV/AIDS: Sharing Experiences and Educational Concepts

P-3 ANACpedia: Online Dictionaries for Aviation Terminology in Portuguese, English, and Spanish

ST-1 Voyage to Antarctica: Translating the Environment

ST-3 How to Read and Translate Risk and Safety Vernacular Phrases in Technical Texts

T-1 Translating the Sesame Street Way!

T-8 Reel Fun: Improving Your Subtitles

 
 

Slavic Languages
Click on the speaker name to view bio.


SL-1 Early History of Simultaneous Interpreting in the USSR and in the West (Susana Greiss Lecture)
Sergei Chernov
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will focus on the speaker’s research into the invention and early adoption of simultaneous interpreting (SI) in the West and the USSR, based on recently discovered archival documents detailing the independent inventions of SI in 1925 by Edward Filene in the West and Dr. V.Z. Epshtein in the USSR. These inventions led to the development of SI systems and their first full-scale use in Moscow and Geneva in 1928.


SL-2 Should Grammatical Gender Be Controversial? One Translator's Point of View: Part I
Irina Knizhnik
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English and Russian)

Russian is a language with mandatory grammatical gender for nouns and a number of other parts of speech. How much information and intent is built into "gender" as a category and how much of it should be conveyed when translating into English? Why has the subject of grammatical gender become controversial and how do we to deal with that in translation? The speaker will discuss how translators can handle the potential implications of including or excluding masculine or feminine forms when translating, or attributing a gender form on demand when translating between Russian and English.


SL-3 Should Grammatical Gender Be Controversial? Translation Issues in Russian and English: Part II
Larry Bogoslaw
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Russian is a language with mandatory grammatical gender for nouns and a number of other parts of speech. The speaker will discuss cases where "extra" information and intent are built into grammatical gender. Such cases go beyond the typical parameters of the translation task. In such instances, the translator must use a range of contextual (extralinguistic) evidence to make responsible choices. Examples include gender-neutral forms in Russian for which no parallel forms exist in English. Another example includes rhetorical uses where the grammatical gender of an inanimate object (or concept) in Russian functions as a meaningful element (e.g., in a poem or speech).


SL-4 Grammatical Problems in Going to, Being in, or Leaving Ukraine
Keith Goeringer
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English, Russian, and Ukrainian)

This session represents a continuation of a study begun in the 1990s that examines a grammatical issue triggered by a geopolitical event. In 1996, several years after Ukraine gained independence, the Ukrainian government issued statements regarding how Ukraine should be referred to in English, Russian, and Ukrainian. In English, this entailed not using the definite article; in Russian and Ukrainian, however, it involved the choice of preposition and case. The speaker will discuss this phenomenon in light of the data sets cited in papers published in 1996 and 2007, as well as new data collected by the speaker.


SL-5 What Dictionaries Don't Tell Us
Anastasia Koralova
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Dictionaries are our friends. Ideally, we expect them to provide us with every possible meaning of a word, its register and connotations, grammatical and cultural features, as well as its most common collocations. Despite the efforts lexicographers put into their dictionaries, they rarely cover all of these characteristics. Many features of the language remain overlooked. This session will cover the most common deficiencies in English>Russian and Russian>English dictionaries and ways to compensate for these shortcomings. Even if the pursuit of an ideal dictionary is quixotic, striving to make bilingual dictionaries more complete brings us closer to the goal.


SL-6 Idiom Translation for Slavic Savants
Svetlana Beloshapkina | Lydia Stone
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English with Russian examples)

Topics discussed during this session will include: 1) recommended dictionaries, websites, and search procedures for translating English and Slavic idiomatic expressions (based on surveys of members of ATA’s Slavic Languages Division); 2) differences and overlap between categories of idiomatic terms in Russian and English; 3) the importance of considering situational, conversational, and emotional contexts when translating idioms; 4) questions of register, including profanity, when translating idioms for various purposes (literature, press, subtitling, interpreting, etc.); 5) creating bilingual dictionaries of specific types of idiomatic expressions, for fun if not profit; and 6) where to find appropriate naturally occurring examples of idiom use.


SL-7 And You Thought English Articles Were Difficult
Emilia Balke
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Bulgarian)

The speaker will discuss three forms of definite and indefinite articles and 45 Bulgarian demonstratives and how to convey their meaning in English. Common errors in the translation of the English articles into Bulgarian will also be addressed. This session will be conducted in English with English translations/back translations of each of the examples given. Translators of all Slavic languages and Greek may find this session beneficial. Attendees will have the opportunity to share and discuss common translation issues when translating articles and demonstratives between English and their respective languages.


 
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