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ATA ATA Activities ET Education & Training
I Interpreting IC Independent Contractors
L Literary Translation LAW Legal T&I
LSC Language Services Companies LT Language Technology
MED Medical T&I ST Science & Technology
T Translation TI T&I Industry
TRM Terminology V Varia




ATA Activities
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ATA-1 ATA Mentoring Program: Becoming a Happy and Prosperous Translator or Interpreter
Cathi Witkowski Changanaqui | Eric Chiang | Susanne Van Eyl
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

ATA's Mentoring Program welcomes aspiring (also past and present) mentors and mentees for an overview of the program and a discussion of topics related to helping newcomers become happy, prosperous professional translators and interpreters.


ATA-2 ATA's Certification Exam: Questions and Answers
Caron Mason | David Stephenson
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This forum will be of interest to attendees seeking a better understanding of ATA’s certification exam and program. The speakers will discuss new developments regarding exam delivery methods, eligibility requirements, and the structure of the exam. They will answer questions about certification policies and procedures and provide tips on how to prepare for the exam.


ATA-3 ATA Code of Ethics and Professional Practice Workshop
Caitilin Walsh
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

While codes of ethics sometimes appear dry and boring as written, applying them in real life can create interesting and juicy dilemmas. This session will examine how ATA's Code of Ethics and Professional Practice applies to real-life situations. It will also address some of the grey areas of professional conduct in translation and interpreting. This session fulfills the ethics requirement for maintaining ATA certification.


ATA-4 School Outreach: 10 Years and Counting
Birgit Vosseler-Brehmer
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Join the success story! This session is for all those interested in participating in ATA's School Outreach Program. Step-by-step, the speaker will walk attendees through the process of giving a presentation on translation and interpreting in a school setting. Attendees will also learn how to compose a winning photo for the annual School Outreach contest. To motivate fellow linguists, the speaker will share some of the tips, games, and activities previous contestants used in their presentations. Attendees will also get a glimpse of the newly-designed School Outreach content on ATA's website.


ATA-5 The BOLD Speaker: Fast Track Your Business
Jan Fox
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Public speaking is the fastest way to grow your client base. Learn four simple concepts to boost your BOLDness and your business. The speaker will reveal her self-developed concepts for effective speaking to build and present your client-winning talk. Every participant receives practice plans and walks out ready to speak with bigger impact, anytime, anywhere, and to anyone.


ATA-6 Buddies Welcome Newbies Debriefing
Helen Eby | Jamie Hartz
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Coming to the conference is a big investment! This session is about follow-up: how to follow up with the contacts made during the conference, how to stay connected with the resources ATA can provide, and how to continue to give back to our community. Guest speakers from ATA's Certification Committee, the Mentoring Program, the Spanish Language Division, and others will discuss resources for translators and interpreters that will help attendees develop their businesses and stay connected. Members of The Savvy Newcomer blog team will also be on hand to learn how they can offer support throughout the year!


ATA Activities
Related Sessions

J-5 Japanese<>English Certification Workshop

S-5 Preparing for the English<>Spanish ATA Certification Exam, Part I

S-6 Preparing for the English>Spanish ATA Certification Exam, Part II

S-7 Preparing for the Spanish>English ATA Certification Exam, Part II

Education & Training
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ET-1 Best Practices for Online Translation and Interpreting Courses
Cristina Silva
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The current translation and interpreting market has many in-person and online course offerings. Online courses have become interesting models for both digital natives and digital immigrants. This session is based on the speaker’s experience at three U.S. universities. Topics will include planning short and long programs, techniques and activities, learning platforms, and the teacher-student relationship. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about practical activities for online courses in translation and interpreting.


ET-2 The First Generation of Conference Interpreters Trained Online: What Can They Teach Us?
Sheyla Carvalho
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In 2011, the speaker adapted the face-to-face conference interpreting training program she had first developed for her company in 2000, and designed a new, fully online training course on conference interpreting. Since 2000, the online course has improved based on input from students and changes in technology. This session will analyze data provided from interviews and surveys undertaken with the speaker's former online students (specifically those who graduated two to five years ago). Students were asked about the impact of online training on their professional careers, with a view toward improving online education for interpreters.


ET-3 Finding the Student's Inner Technologist: Best Practices for Teaching CAT Tools, Localization, and Terminology Online
Barbara Inge Karsch | Jon Ritzdorf | Julie Tay
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In recent years, the translation industry’s need for technical skills has increased. However, students in academic translation programs often consider computer-assisted translation, localization, and terminology courses intimidating and/or superfluous. How do instructors dispel biases, engage students in the virtual classroom, and communicate their passion for these subjects to reveal their students’ inner technologist? A panel of instructors will provide tips and best practices to enhance course design. They will discuss developing strategies to make these subject areas compelling fields of practice so apprentice translators can thrive in today’s translation industry.


ET-4 New Approaches in Directionality for Teaching Long Consecutive
Cas Shulman Mora
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Spanish interpreting students at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey have traditionally received instruction during all four semesters of their consecutive interpreting training in two distinct unidirectional classes, each taught by a native speaker of the target language. While this pedagogical model has been used for at least the past two decades at the Monterey Institute, the speakers have long posited that a bidirectional teaching model might provide interpreting students with significant additional benefits. The mechanics of the bidirectional class experiment and the associated outcomes will be discussed during this session.


ET-5 Assessment Activities in the Translation Classroom
Antonio F. Jiménez Jiménez
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The assessment of translation competence is arguably one of the most challenging aspects for translation instructors. Traditional assessment techniques follow a product-based approach that focuses on providing students with feedback that highlights the errors they make in their translation assignments (i.e., terminology, style, transfer problems, grammar mistakes). This session will provide additional modes of assessment that take both the final translation and the translation process into consideration. A wide variety of self-assessment, peer-assessment, and instructor-originated assessment activities will be discussed. Special emphasis will be given to the importance of self-reflection in the assessment process.


ET-6 "Expertise Effect" Among Translation Professionals: Survey Results and Strategies for Curriculum Design
Monica Rodriguez-Castro
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will investigate the “expertise effect” in the language services industry. Due to the complexity of many of today’s projects, specialization, technical expertise, and project management skills have become essential for a translator's professional profile. This has become a source of concern for young professionals and students who may lack training in many required skills. Sources of dissatisfaction reported by novice translators have been identified based on data collected in a survey, and these findings will be used for curriculum design. This session aims to initiate a discourse between educators and employers on how to accelerate student expertise and prepare them for success in the language industry.


Interpreting
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

I-1 Join the Fastest-Growing Job Market for Interpreters
Marjory Bancroft | Giovanna Carriero-Contreras
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Demand for community interpreting is growing rapidly. Whether you want work in health care, social services, legal settings, or schools, jobs are opening up. Do you know where to find those jobs and which ones pay the most? How do you get them? Learn about the qualifications you need, where the new jobs are, the scoop on online training, why certifications matter, and much more. You’ll learn the latest developments in the field from three authors of one of the most prestigious international textbooks for community interpreting.


I-2 Language Access as Teamwork: Professionals and Government Working Together
Rebekah Tosado | Amy Vance
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will discuss how the Department of Homeland Security is working to improve access to its programs to persons with limited English proficiency. Attendees will learn of the major steps the agency has taken to provide meaningful access in order to communicate with these individuals effectively. Attendees will also learn how the insights and expertise of organizations like ATA contribute to this effort.


I-3 Interpret This! Speechpool and the European Union Speech Repository 2.0
Judy Jenner
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

One of the challenges for interpreters is that there aren’t enough high-level practice videos and speeches available to help them keep their skills sharp or to prepare for exams. It can also be difficult to find speeches at the right speed for practice. The speaker will introduce two resources that will help attendees solve this problem. Speechpool features hundreds of videos created by interpreters for interpreters. The European Union’s Speech Repository, which was designed for conference interpreter training, had been restricted to students, but it is now open to everyone. The speaker will provide tips and tricks on how to best use these sites.


I-4 Expecting the Unexpected In and Out of the Booth
Cristina Silva
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Come learn how you can develop nerves of steel and manage your emotions in and out of the booth and in the field. Attendees will walk away with proven techniques to manage stress, emotions, and insecurities when interpreting.


I-5 Breaking the Silence: Interpreting for Victim Services
Marjory Bancroft
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

This session is not for the faint of heart! It focuses on interpreting for victims of violent crime, including loved ones left behind after a homicide. If you interpret for human trafficking, domestic violence, sexual assault, assault and robbery, mass disasters such as the Boston Marathon bombing, or for family members at the morgue, this session is for you. It highlights practical techniques and strategies, essential terminology, and key lessons gleaned from a four-day training developed by the speakers that will become public domain by December 2015, funded by the Office of Victim Services in Washington, DC. Stretch yourselves: learn more about an emerging specialization.


I-6 Traumatic Stress and Professional Interpreters
Mila Golovine | Sabina Metcalf
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Interpreters are often warned that there will be times when they come under significant stress and feel vulnerable in traumatic situations as a result of their everyday work in the health care and legal fields. Despite these warnings, we sometimes forget about our well-being, about the need to remain mindful of what could lead to depression, and about what could impact our lives and the lives of everyone around us. This session will discuss the latest developments in the area and provide practical advice, tailored specifically for professional interpreters, on ways to tackle traumatic stress.


I-7 Interpreting Emotions: Interpreting in a Time of War and Peace
Faiza Sultan
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Interpreting emotions means having to interpret the essence of what the speaker is saying. The speaker will share her experience as an interpreter in Iraq and the U.S. in times of war and peace. Topics will include her work in the field, what is beneath and beyond the words that you have to interpret in a tough environment, and how to manage your emotions to work effectively.


I-8 Interpreting with CLAS: Cultural and Linguistically Appropriate Services
Marisa Gillio | Carol Velandia
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Language access services are evolving quickly. Institutions receiving federal funding are obliged to provide cultural and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS) to limited-English-proficient individuals. The increasing number of immigrants (and government regulations) is transforming the landscape of the interpreting profession. Medical interpreters in particular need to understand these standards in order to practice in the health care field and improve the profession as a whole. This session will provide the background and rational for the implementation of CLAS standards, its impact on medical interpreters, and the practical tools they need to create a distinct medical interpreter portfolio.


I-9 Boost Your B Language Fluency
Karen Bahr | Kelly Varguez
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English with Spanish examples)

The speakers have bonded over a common frustration: the struggle to find renditions that sound natural in their B language. After years of struggling with renditions that somehow fell flat, the two hit upon some little-known techniques and resources to improve their B language fluency naturally. Join the pair as they share the resources, apps, and techniques they love to use when their B language skills need a boost. All languages welcome. Examples will be in Spanish and English.


I-10 How to Make the Transition from Translator to Interpreter
Georganne Weller
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session is designed for newcomers to translation who are also intrigued with the possibility of becoming interpreters, as well for as longstanding practitioners who would like to broaden their horizons by adding professional interpreting to their curriculum vitae. What is involved and what skills do you need? How can you acquire new skills? These questions will be answered and tips provided on how to achieve your goals. Exercises will be included.


I-11 ASTM and International Standards Organization Interpreting Standards
Sue Ellen Wright
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The International Standards Organization is preparing standards on interpreting, including general guidelines for interpreting, a suite of standards governing equipment used in simultaneous interpreting, and guidelines for interpreting services in judicial settings. The panelists will discuss the merits of these proposed standards. Will the requirements stated in these international standards be globally relevant? Do the equipment descriptions reflect current best practices?


I-12 Remote Interpreting: Options and Standards
Cyril Flerov
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Remote simultaneous interpreting has become more popular in recent years, especially in light of major technological advances. It exists in various configurations (e.g., “internal cable," "external cable," or "from home"). This session will explore various options for simultaneous interpreting that exist on the market, as well as current business practices. The pros and cons of using technology and how it may influence conference interpreting markets will also be discussed. There are still many challenges associated with the technology, and hiring practices and quality standards are not yet completely clear to the professional interpreter community.


Interpreting
Related Sessions

SEM-D Title VI: Overview and Enforcement

SEM-H Saving the Lives of Children: Interpreters Helping Families and Patients Overcome Language Barriers

A-3 Court Interpreting and Legal Terminology for Arabic Interpreters

ET-2 The First Generation of Conference Interpreters Trained Online: What Can They Teach Us?

ET-4 New Approaches in Directionality for Teaching Long Consecutive

J-3 Deposition Interpreting Workshop

K-1 Conference Interpreting Explained: Challenges, Strategies, and Skills (English>Korean)

LAW-1 Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts, Part I

LAW-5 Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts, Part II

N-2 Compassion Fatigue: Risk Factors and Prevention for Interpreters

P-4 An Overview of the Interpreting Profession

P-8 Are You an Engaged Pivot?

S-1 "Yes, I Touched Her Down There": Interpreting for Victims and Sex Offenders

S-13 "I Haven't Had My Sex Reassignment Surgery Yet": Interpreting for Gender-Non-Conforming Patients

SL-1 Early History of Simultaneous Interpreting in the USSR and in the West (Susana Greiss Lecture)

Independent Contractors
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

IC-1 How to Price Your Work and Stay on Top of Your Business
Jonathan Hine
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

Translators and interpreters are in business. Pricing and monitoring financial performance are crucial to business success. This session will cover the elements of budgeting and business planning. The methodology will help attendees develop personal criteria for accepting or rejecting freelance assignments, balancing employment offers, and choosing alternatives for business expansion. The session will also cover calculating the break-even price and tracking sales volume and revenue. This is not a number-crunching presentation, so come prepared to enjoy learning how to set your business on a solid financial footing and keep it there.


IC-2 Translation Contract Negotiation: How to Get to "Yes" and Seal the Deal
Paula Arturo
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Negotiation is often portrayed as a zero-sum game, but trained negotiators know there’s nothing further from the truth. The speaker will examine the four key elements of business negotiations, ranging from planning a negotiation to evaluating an agreement before closing translation deals. We’ll look at how translators can quickly measure their best alternative to a negotiated agreement, how to draw out and use decision trees, and which legal considerations should be part of a translation negotiation and contract.


IC-3 Managing the Mingling
John Di Rico
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Do you experience anxiety when you think about attending meetings and social events? By the end of this session you’ll have a better understanding of the benefits of attending a business or social function, be better prepared prior to attending such functions, and be able to employ different networking strategies during the function.


IC-4 Avoiding and Pursuing Lawsuits to Collect for Translation Projects
Charles Campbell | Marian S. Greenfield | Kadisha Phelps
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The topic of lawsuits for collection purposes in the U.S. translation industry is a very thorny issue that translators strive to avoid. The speakers will first discuss how lawsuits can best be avoided, especially by having a strong contract. They will then provide an overview of the various steps, stages, and expenses involved, and strategies on how to obtain favorable results, often in the context of unequal odds when dealing with a much larger corporation. This discussion will pertain to multi-language vendors as well as freelance translators.


IC-5 Expat Linguists in a Globalized World: Tips on Living and (Legally) Working Abroad
Laura Tridico
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Freelance linguists can, in theory, work anywhere in the world. But what does it take to make that dream a reality? This session will provide a general overview of the immigration and tax issues to be considered before making the leap. We'll look at the wide range of eligibility standards for self-employment visas in a number of countries, reveal which countries make it comparatively easy for foreign freelancers to work within their borders, and discuss the tax implications of working abroad (including VAT registration and the impact of global taxation of U.S. citizens).


IC-6 Breaking into the Direct Client Market
Corinne McKay
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Many freelance translators would like to work with direct clients either to earn more money, increase their job satisfaction, or target a specialization that agencies don't generally handle. In this nuts-and-bolts session, you'll learn how to create and implement a direct client acquisition plan from the ground up. We'll look at the marketing material you need, how to find direct clients to target, how to find untapped niches within the translation industry, how to profile your ideal clients, and finally, how to actually make contact with these elusive direct clients.


IC-7 Working for the U.S. Federal Government: Essential Tips
Richard Estevez
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

As the largest buyer of interpreting and translation services in the world, the U.S. federal government can be a great source of stable work and growth. Whether you work directly or through prime contractors, there is important information you should keep in mind when working on federal contracts. The speaker will discuss key aspects of working for the federal government, including required clearances, important protocols to follow, and other important requirements. Key tips on how to market your services directly to the federal government and to prime contractors will be included. The speaker will also discuss receiving and maintaining a top secret clearance.


IC-8 How to Use Blogging and Social Media to Grow Your Client List
Catherine Christaki
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Sending unsolicited e-mail to potential clients is not as effective anymore (actually, such email is usually treated as spam). However, many translators are too shy to call potential new clients. Good thing there are other free and easy-to-use tools to generate contact leads. Finding potential clients using the power of the web is a process that must be personalized to fit the needs of the translator. This session will explore approaches, tools, and ideas to generate leads for contacting potential clients using blogging, Twitter, and LinkedIn.


IC-9 Clearing the Way to Opportunity: An Introduction to Security Clearances
Alair Fritz | Virginia Wilkins Hinders
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Having a security clearance can open doors to new clients and types of work for linguists in all fields. But what exactly is a security clearance? How can a linguist get a clearance? What level is "high enough" for work that is available? The speakers will explain the differences in security clearance levels, the steps that may be involved in obtaining a security clearance, the barriers that can arise, the types of job opportunities that require security clearances, how current events have changed the investigative process, and, most importantly, what a security clearance means in today's competitive marketplace.


IC-10 How to Find and Approach Your Ideal Clients through LinkedIn
Catherine Christaki
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

LinkedIn is better for lead generation than other social network. It’s an amazing business-building tool based on a massive database of people and the companies they work for/with. This makes LinkedIn one of the easiest ways to identify and learn more about prospects before contacting them. This session will offer tips on improving your profile, what to share and common mistakes to avoid, how to use keywords to search for potential ideal clients, and how to approach prospects through personalized invitations and e-mail.


IC-11 Client Satisfaction Surveys for Freelance Translators
Michael Farrell
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

During an unusually slow period, the speaker sent out a satisfaction questionnaire with the goal of bringing his services more in line with his clients' requirements. The research he conducted on this type of survey to choose the right questions to ask gave him a totally new perspective on how his clients perceive the quality of his services. The speaker will discuss the kinds of questions typically asked and how appropriate they are to the translation industry. He will then explain the purpose of each question he actually chose, the answers he received, and the conclusions he drew from the survey results.


IC-12 Productivity Strategies for Freelance Professionals
Dorothee Racette
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Given all of the demands of running a successful freelance business, what are the best approaches for balancing sanity and profitability? What are some of the factors that may be holding you back? This session will highlight several practical strategies to help you produce high-quality work while promoting your business and staying organized. We will discuss individual tactics for dealing with fluctuating workloads and the need for continuous improvement. Attendees will learn about specific techniques to manage their time and explore ways to make the most of their working hours.


IC-13 Create Focus and Simplify Your Efforts with a Marketing Plan for Your Translation Business
Tess Whitty
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Do you struggle with finding the time to market your services or feel you lack a plan? This session will provide you with a template to create a short marketing plan. We’ll go through the plan step by step, giving you examples for your translation business and a chance to fill in your own marketing plan. When finished, you’ll have an overview of your marketing situation and a to-do list for the coming year for getting more or better clients and to stand out among your competitors.


IC-14 Packaging and Positioning: How to Market to Language Services Providers
Elizabeth Colón
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Beginner; Presented in: English)

When working as a freelance interpreter or translator, it is essential to search for creative ways to market yourself. Aligning yourself with a language services provider is a great way to establish a level of volume that will grow your independent business. How do you stand out to language services companies? What will make you more attractive as a contractor? The speaker will share inside knowledge of what language services providers are looking for in an interpreter/translator. Sharpen your marketing arsenal with résumé tips, networking recommendations, and social media and online tactics.


IC-15 Creating a Professional Brand: What Works for You?
Valeria Aliperta
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Combined with the right communication strategies and online tools, freelancers in the translation and interpreting industry can use branding to gain visibility and enhance their online profile. The speaker will discuss the value of branding, showing why it’s so relevant and how it works around us. Topics will include what works and what doesn’t, the inception of a design, what’s behind the idea, and how to create an identity that says something about who you really are as a businessperson.


IC-16 Exploring Transcription Services for Professional Linguists
Sasha Carrillo | Shannon Curth
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday 3:30pm to Saturday 8:30am

There is a great demand for precise and accurate conversion of audio/video content to written text, also known as transcription. Translators and interpreters worldwide can seize this fantastic business and professional growth opportunity by providing transcription services as a way to complement and maximize the skills they have already developed as professional linguists. The speakers will focus on an overview of the market for transcription, as well as the skills required to work as a professional transcriptionist.


IC-17 NEW SESSION
Get More Business: Successful Sales Techniques for Translators and Interpreters
Paul Urwin
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Would you like to sell more translations? Would you benefit from having more clients? Sales are at the core of any business or freelance activity and this session will explore detailed steps that you can take to start selling more right away. Topics will include increasing your conversion rates, overcoming objections, tailoring your offerings to each client, and negotiating discounts. Take advantage of this opportunity to improve your knowledge of sales processes that work.


IC-18 NEW SESSION
Home Is Where the Job Is: Working While Traveling
Jonathan Hine
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Those of us who serve as bridges between cultures know that travel enriches our work as much as our lives. Indeed, it nourishes our very souls. For most, traveling involves breaking away and coming back. However, as language professionals in the 21st century, we don’t have to make travel an exception to our "normal life." Some basic principles and tips for making working while traveling easier and more effective should empower you to take your show on the road, whether your ticket is one-way or round-trip. This session is intended for anyone who travels, not just translators.


Independent Contractors
Related Sessions

G-5 Ticken die Deutschen anders? Understanding the Idiosyncrasies of Doing Business in Germany

I-1 Join the Fastest-Growing Job Market for Interpreters

LAW-4 The International Human Rights Arena: A World of Opportunities for Experienced Translators

LSC-8 The Tax Collector Just Called: How to Survive Your First Tax Audit

LSC-9 When Is the Price Right? Pricing Models and Price Elasticity in Translation Projects

ST-8 A Lucrative Sideline: Editing Non-Native English Scientific Writing

TI-3 How Translators and Translation Companies Can Benefit from the ISO 17100 Translation Requirements Standard

TI-4 The Power of Collective Engagement: A Dynamic Forum on Being Heard, Contributing to Policy, and Making a Difference

Literary Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

L-1 Finding the Author’s Voice in Literary Translation (While Silencing Yours)
Mercedes Guhl
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

One of the challenges for a literary translator is finding a way to reproduce the tone and style of the original without imprinting one’s own voice, so that the versions retain the sound of the author’s text instead of echoing the translator’s voice. This session will deal with strategies for going beyond one’s own lexical and stylistic choices in order to remain within the framework set by the features of the original text. The session is based on the speaker’s experience and on other colleagues’ strategies that she has collected during conversations and interviews throughout the years.


L-2 Beware of the Fallible Filter and Unreliable Narrator: Enhancing Professional Trust
Susan Xu
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The fallible filter and unreliable narrator are two forms of untrustworthiness in literary narratives. In the former, the narrator invites the readers to enjoy an irony at the expense of the character. In the latter, the author conveys the secret ironic message to his readers via the narrator. This session uses examples from a political autobiography to illustrate how fallible filters are transferred and transformed in the translation process. An understanding of the processes and consequences will enable translators to reflect on their practice and enhance their professional trustworthiness.


L-3 Trials and Tribulations of Translated Literature from the Margins
Vivan Steemers | Faiza Sultan
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Thursday 3:30pm to Friday 11:15am

The speakers will discuss the feats and features of literature produced by minority cultures, the "margins" that have garnered the interest of Anglo-American publishers, translators, and ultimately their readership. What are the specific challenges faced by these writers from the "fringes" in their efforts to publish and disseminate their texts in a globalized book market? What pitfalls do they confront as their texts are inserted in a discourse of marginality that is immediately local but potentially global in its effects? The speakers will address the situation of authors from the Middle East and Francophone sub-Saharan Africa.


L-4 Measuring a Translation's Success: The Example of Thomas Piketty's Capital in the 21st Century
Patricia Phillips-Batoma
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English and French)

This session will explore how we measure the success of any translation, focusing specifically on the recent commercial success of the English translation of Thomas Piketty's Capital au XXIe siècle. What role, if any, did the choices made by the English-language translator contribute to the unprecedented success of a work of nonfiction written by a university professor of economics? The speaker will analyze selected portions of the English-language translation in an attempt to discern to what extent the translation itself, and not just the subject matter, contributed to the book's unprecedented success.


L-5 CANCELLED
Translating an Alternative to Tocqueville
Carolyn Yohn
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




L-6 The New Normal: Cuba and the Power of Translation (Marilyn Gaddis Rose Lecture)
Esther Allen
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

When normalization of U.S. relations with Cuba was announced in December, many U.S. commentators delighted in the prospect of an "invasion of tourists, traders, and investors." Cuba is no novice to globalization and has formulated a distinctive series of reactions to it. Founding father José Martí wrote about it extensively. In the early 20th century, Cuban anthropologist Fernando Ortíz coined the term "transculturation" to describe the distinctively Cuban process whereby new cultural realities are synthesized out of the encounter between disparate cultures characteristic of the history of Cuba. That history holds some significant lessons about the roles translation can play in the process of globalization.


L-7 NEW SESSION
The Translator as Author
Mercedes Guhl | Abe Haak | Faiza Sultan
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English, Arabic, German, French, and Spanish)

With a clear vision of both the target audience and the intended impact, the literary translator reshapes, edits, and invents to achieve the goal of transporting the experience of reading the original text across a linguistic frontier. Linguistically speaking, literary translation is an act of creation in its own right. Covering several language pairs, the speakers will discuss the editing, reworking, and completion of the target text.


Literary Translation
Related Sessions

C-2 English Translation of Classical Chinese Poems: Technical Issues and Implications

G-3 Sex and Crime in English and German

J-4 Challenges of Literary Translation: Finding Your Voice

Legal T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LAW-1 Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts, Part I
Alfonso Villaseñor
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

CHANGE: Moved from Thursday 3:30pm to Saturday 2:00pm

This session will examine numerous issues associated with the equivalent interpretation of slang and taboo expressions from Mexican Spanish into English in a courtroom setting. The complexity and occasional raw nature of this type of language can pose technical challenges for court interpreters that extend far beyond the mere understanding of terminology. Moreover, the prevalence of Mexican Spanish in U.S. courts makes it particularly relevant compared to other versions of the language. Interpreters need to recognize the importance of achieving adequate proficiency in the lower registers of both languages.


LAW-2 I Now Pronounce You ...
Robert Sette
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Beginner; Presented in: English)

The varied patchwork of marriage laws as they relate to same sex marriages and unions has created a bit of a conundrum in social circles, family gatherings, business dealings, and, yes, even in translation matters. The speaker will survey the status of same sex marriage laws in countries of the European Union and North and South America, and will provide guidelines for discussing unions and separations of various sorts in English. Although some examples may be taken from major Western European languages, the primary focus will be on translation issues that come up in English.


LAW-3 The Road from Application to Issued Patent
Bruce Popp
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Find out what the differences are between a patent application that is filed, published, abandoned, rejected, granted, and issued and what happens to move the application along through these milestones. After the patent is issued there’s still room for post-grant proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, for opposition at the European Patent Office, and for reports prepared by experts for the French courts. Along the road, various documents are produced that you may be asked to translate. This session will give you a better understanding of the context and importance of these documents.


LAW-4 The International Human Rights Arena: A World of Opportunities for Experienced Translators
Paula Arturo
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

The international human rights arena is hungry for experienced legal translators. As the United Nations Human Rights Council and other relevant international forums open their doors to human rights and civil society organizations, state and non-state actors are experiencing an increased need for qualified professionals to help them communicate in a variety of languages. This session will cover what these organizations look for in a translator, what their needs are, which skills and qualifications matter most, and how to market to them.


LAW-5 NEW SESSION
Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts, Part II
Alfonso Villaseñor
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

See abstract for LAW-1: Interpreting Slang and Taboo Language for the Courts, Part I.


Legal T&I
Related Sessions

A-3 Court Interpreting and Legal Terminology for Arabic Interpreters

G-6 Financial-Legal Weasel Words Revisited: An Interactive Discussion and Analysis for German>English Translators

J-3 Deposition Interpreting Workshop

N-1 Translating Norwegian Legal Texts

P-6 Portuguese<>English Contract Terminology and Concepts, Part II

S-1 "Yes, I Touched Her Down There": Interpreting for Victims and Sex Offenders

S-10 Considerations for Translating Contracts and Notarial Instruments

Language Services Companies
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LSC-1 Correcting False Expectations: Translators and Project Managers
Virginia Anderson
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Mutual distrust and false assumptions pervade this industry. Let's clear the air. We are not each other's enemies. We must cooperate and trust to achieve successful deliverables for our end-clients. This involves clear communication and mutual understanding of the role each party plays in a project. How do translation companies add value to the translation process? What do translators and project managers expect of each other? How do you create a project specification that defines everyone's roles and responsibilities? This session will help attendees gain a better understanding of the roles and perspectives of translators and project managers.


LSC-2 Getting the Most Out of Working with In-house Revisers
Damon Loomer | María Fernanda Lozano
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Most translators deliver self-revised work, often without any additional quality assurance from clients. Most get used to "going it alone," making their own decisions about terminology, style, usage, punctuation, etc. But what happens when an in-house reviser is added to the quality assurance chain? This is where specific terminology requirements, "house style," and an insider's understanding of the organization come into play. As the "client's eye," in-house revisers are a critical first reader and a valuable source of help and guidance. The speaker will discuss some approaches to a harmonious and productive relationship, which is often your best guarantee of getting that next job.


LSC-3 Finders Keepers: A Language Services Provider's Approach to Sustainable Vendor Management
Michael Bearden
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will reveal the round-the-clock efforts of a language services provider (LSP) as it cultivates and manages a growing database of international contract linguists and global support staff. The speakers will detail their efforts and share tools and technologies aimed at managing the recruitment, selection, qualification, performance rating, and development of external resources as per their overall operations strategy and priorities. Attendees will enjoy an objective, transparent glimpse into the vendor management process of a language services provider and receive tips to help best leverage their work and maximize mutual potential for success.


LSC-4 Translator Satisfaction Surveys for Language Services Providers: The Path to a Happy Translator
Celine Imbaud | Sarah Puchner | Lea Stancavich
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The session will provide an overview of how language services providers (LSPs) can use satisfaction surveys as a tool to collect feedback from freelancers and apply the results in daily operations. The session will provide a step-by-step explanation of how to create a survey, provide sample questions, and explain how to evaluate and implement the feedback to improve the LSP’s day-to-day processes. Doing so will benefit both the LSP and the translator and ultimately improve their working relationship. Attendees will learn how to use the survey results as a sales tool for existing and potential clients.


LSC-5 The Secrets of Marketing Your Services to Health Care Clients
Megumi Segawa | Jessica Walsh
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translation related to health care is a rapidly growing niche within the translation world, but the client's needs are often very different from the typical legal, business, or academic client. The speakers will share their experiences as translation division managers for a major university health car system and offer suggestions for making translation services more accessible and attractive to hospital clients. The session will include an introduction to common health care translation requests, as well as practical tips on effective medical translation, strategies to develop user-friendly material, and ideas about marketing yourself to health care clients. Translators and project managers are welcome.


LSC-6 Language Services for Unicorns and Other Creatives
Virginia Anderson
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The speaker will discuss how to provide language services to unicorns, creatives in the fields of design, entertainment, advertising, and marketing. Unicorns need special cultural consulting and magical language services to launch brands, websites, films, and marketing campaigns on an international scale. Learn how to tame, collaborate, and work successfully with these enchanting, creative customers.


LSC-7 How Language Services Providers Can Benchmark Their Organizational Maturity
Hélène Pielmeier
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What makes a language services provider more evolved than another? To enable suppliers with a culture of excellence to distinguish themselves, a model was developed to assess the organizational maturity of language services providers. Instead of chanting “quality, service, and price,” providers will learn how to make a more substantive statement about their evolved state. They’ll also be able to map out a practical path to progress to a more advanced maturity stage characterized by fewer failures, predictable results, and higher profitability.


LSC-8 CANCELLED
The Tax Collector Just Called: How to Survive Your First Tax Audit
Brian Bickford | Melissa Bickford
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




LSC-9 When Is the Price Right? Pricing Models and Price Elasticity in Translation Projects
Cesar Muedas
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Maintaining a sustainable workflow in conjunction with healthy financial performance means facing the challenges of the translation marketplace, including pricing and supply/demand conditions specific to each project. The speaker will illustrate, using specific examples, how the following approaches can assist translation companies refine pricing models and exploit the elasticity of those prices: conventional word count, charge per fixed unit, turn-key delivery, lifecycle of localization, and audit-ready project management. Timely decision-making, in tandem with competitive advantages and risk management practices, will ultimately lead to the alignment of pricing practices and quality standards specific to each organization.


Language Services Companies
Related Sessions

TI-2 The ASTM International Translation and Interpreting Standards: Updated

TI-3 How Translators and Translation Companies Can Benefit from the ISO 17100 Translation Requirements Standard

Language Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

LT-1 Demystifying Machine Translation
Jay Marciano
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Machine translation attempts to perform a fundamentally human task: rendering a sentence from one language into another. Whether you consider machine translation friend or foe, every translator should have a basic understanding of what it is and how it works. This session turns the tables on machine translation by providing a very human explanation of how such a system is built and how it creates a translation of a sentence it has never before encountered. Attendees will gain an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of machine translation and learn how it can be used in appropriate projects effectively.


LT-2 Ready to Surf the Machine Translation Post-Editing Wave?
Jose Palomares
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Want to learn more about post-editing, but don't know where to start? More importantly, does it pay? Some self-analysis exercises can help you determine if post-editing is a viable option, both professionally and financially.


LT-3 Post-Editing: How to Future-Proof Your Career in Translation
Paulo Camargo
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Recent developments in machine translation (MT) systems are driving a revolution in the translation industry, much like translation memory (TM) did two decades ago. Combining MT and post-editing (MTPE) can now deliver the quality, productivity gain, and price reduction demanded by the market. This session will identify best practices and skills required for post-editing, as well as available sources for training and certification. It will also explore other possibilities for using MT output, such as a starting point for translation to increase productivity or the replacement of combined TMs. The speaker will discuss how small LSPs can involve in-house translators in MTPE activities to quickly get started in this area.


LT-4 Introduction to Swordfish: A Cross-Platform CAT Tool
Rafa Lombardino
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

The speaker will walk attendees through the steps involved in a translation project using Swordfish, a computer-assisted translation tool that is platform-independent and works on Windows, Mac, and Linux computers. Attendees will learn about the file format used by Swordfish and how this tool is compatible with other computer-assisted translation tools on the market. Translation memory, terminology database, tags, and concordance searches will be discussed. A side-by-side preview will also be shown.


LT-5 Solving Terminology Problems More Quickly with IntelliWebSearch
Michael Farrell
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Without a time-saving tool, checking terms entails copying words to your Windows clipboard repeatedly, opening your browser, opening the most appropriate online resources, pasting terms into search boxes, setting search parameters, clicking search buttons, analyzing results, copying the best solutions back to the clipboard, and then returning to your working environment and pasting in the results. This session examines some typical search problems translators face, looks at how they can be solved with a touch of "search engine theory," and explains how IntelliWebSearch can be used to save settings and perform searches literally at the press of a keyboard shortcut.


LT-6 Improve Your Workflow Using Spreadsheet and Macro Programs
Naomi Sutcliffe de Moraes
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Do you do everything in a text editor because you never got the hang of spreadsheets? Do you wish you could just type abbreviations for long words you have to type repeatedly? If so, then this session is for you! The speaker will explain how to use spreadsheets to manage your terminology and the business side of your translation business. She will also explain how to use macro programs like AutoHotKeys to allow you to type an abbreviation for those long words in any program, not just your text editor. Both Windows and Mac OS solutions will be discussed.


LT-7 Termbases and Term Recognition: The Next Best Thing in Trados Studio
Tuomas Kostiainen
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Surprisingly, many Trados Studio users don’t use term bases and Studio's automatic term recognition feature during translation. This is unfortunate because the use of term recognition and term bases can speed up translation work and improve consistency and translation quality. This session will show how term bases can be created easily, either from scratch or by converting from Word or Excel, and how they can be used and updated with Trados Studio. No previous term base experience necessary! Instructions on how to use Glossary Converter and Glossary Plugin OpenExchange apps will also be included.


LT-8 Streamlining Your Workflow: Useful Desktop Software and Mobile Applications for the Interpreting and Translation Industry
Valeria Aliperta
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Recent developments in mobile, online, and software technologies offer many solutions to boost productivity and streamline admin work and efficiency in the booth. This session will focus on the best mobile/desktop applications and software for admin/folder management, payments and invoicing, communication, syncing, and backup, as well as sharing tools and terminology. Despite the fact that no computer-assisted translation tools are compatible with mobile devices, plenty of applications help keep it all under control. These apps include to-do lists that sync on all platforms, financial management apps, word-processing, PDF makers, mobile scanners, speech recognition software, audio notes, Skype, or E-fax.


LT-9 CANCELLED
Cloud-Based Applications for Translators: Optimizing the Work Environment
Alfonso Romero
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




LT-10 Beyond the Basics: Tips for Better Formatting in Microsoft Word
Jill R. Sommer
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

If you've worked in Microsoft Word, you know formatting documents can be challenging. This session will be an eye-opening, nontechnical explanation of how to simplify and understand document formatting. We will cover effective and strategic use of tabs, tables, and other Word program tricks and tips to create a document that is easy to use and which your clients will love.


LT-11 PDFs, OCR, and Formatting, Oh My! Dealing with Flat PDFs Quickly and Efficiently
Allison Bryant
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Clients frequently ask translators to translate scanned PDF documents (the dreaded “Flat PDF”). The client only has a PDF in a foreign language and needs it in English with formatting that matches the original. What do you do? Re-creating a source document may seem daunting, but there are tricks to make it easier. The speaker will explain how document re-creation is an important, non-linguistic tool in a translator’s arsenal, how to use the available technology to your best advantage, and how to really impress your clients without wasting your time and energy.


LT-12 Using Bilingual Comparable Corpora to Assist Specialized Translation
Peng Wang
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

In order to translate specialized texts, translators need to know terms and concepts pertaining to the particular specialized field in both cultures. This session will show you how to use BootCat software to create your own bilingual comparable corpora on specific topics. The speaker will demonstrate some corpus analysis tools, including AntConc, Wordsmith, and ParaConc, which can be used to assist translators to identify equivalent expressions for the same concept. These tools can make a translator’s work much more efficient.


LT-13 XML, XPath, XSLT: The 'X' files?
Paul Filkin
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Today's translator must be prepared to use translation tools that are built to handle different types of files, including XML, XPath, and XSLT. Learning a few simple things can take you a long way and remove the mystique around what these “X” files are all about. This session will help attendees understand enough of the principles to be able to handle these files in any translation tool and improve the translation experience for everyone involved. This session will focus on technology that effects all tools.


Language Technology
Related Sessions

SEM-C Hands-on Machine Translation: Do-It-Yourself Tools

TT-1 SDL Trados Studio/MultiTerm for Beginners

TT-2 Déjà Vu for Beginners

TT-3 SDL Trados Studio Advanced

TT-4 Introduction to memoQ Tutorial

ET-3 Finding the Student's Inner Technologist: Best Practices for Teaching CAT Tools, Localization, and Terminology Online

I-12 Remote Interpreting: Options and Standards

Medical T&I
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

MED-1 SOAP Notes: Getting Down and Dirty with Medical Translation
Erin Lyons
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Progress notes and patient records are the medical translator's bread and butter, but this doesn't prevent even the most experienced medical translators from getting burnt. We'll take a closer look at the SOAP (Subjective, Objective, Assessment, Plan) format to understand how doctors think. We'll use the tool to understand why "BS" could mean "blood sugar," "breath sounds," or "bowel sounds." We'll also build a kit of multilingual resources for the review of systems, lab reports, etc. Finally, we'll address capturing succinct source-language style in a translation that is meaningful and not unduly conservative.


MED-2 Introduction to Veterinary Translation
Lori Newman
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

With increasing international trade in animal products and veterinary drugs, the translation of veterinary medical documents is a burgeoning field. While many diseases and medications span the animal kingdom (including humans), others are unique to reptiles or nonhuman primates. The diversity of veterinary medicine brings specialized terminology and concepts. Thus, translating veterinary documents requires a tailored approach. This session will introduce the fundamentals of veterinary medicine by comparing it to human medicine. Examples from French and Spanish veterinary texts will illustrate terminological and conceptual translation challenges. This session is intended for all experience levels, but medical or scientific expertise will enhance understanding.


MED-3 Different Types of Catheterization: Uses, Indications, and Catheter Types
Frieda Ruppaner-Lind
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Catheters are used to treat many medical conditions. Advances in medical technology have led to an increased use of catheterization, a technique that can replace conventional surgery and treat life-threatening conditions by using minimally invasive procedures. This session will provide translators and interpreters working in the medical field with an overview of the most important types of catheters and procedures currently used. An illustrated multilingual glossary of key terms in English, German, French, and Spanish will be provided as a handout.


MED-4 Risky Business: Infectious Disease Exposure in the Interpreting Workplace
Patricia Thickstun
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Interpreting workplaces pose various risks for exposure to infectious diseases. Patients with Ebola, previously considered a distant threat, recently exposed many health care staff to infection, and several subsequently developed the disease. Although Ebola is currently the most feared disease in the workplace, risk of exposure to other infectious agents is much higher. This session will discuss infectious disease risks and risk-reduction strategies in medical, immigration, and judiciary settings. Attendees will learn how to describe disease organisms, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatment, as well as use workplace disease-specific terminology and identify strategies to communicate and reduce risk. Terminology resources and skills-building exercises will be provided.


MED-5 Interpreting for Patients with HIV/AIDS: Sharing Experiences and Educational Concepts
Thais Miller
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

This session will offer insight into working with patients who have HIV and AIDS, told from the perspective of a medical interpreter who specializes in this field. The incidence of infection among Spanish-speaking patients and the spread of the disease will be covered, in addition to the differences between HIV and AIDS and the types of medicine that are available currently to patients. Special topics will include how pregnant patients with HIV are treated, the ways different psychiatric conditions are managed for HIV/AIDS patients, specific challenges for transgender patients, and how transplants are dealt with for patients with this disease.


MED-6 CANCELLED
Medical Signs and Symptoms: Exploring Common Interpreting and Translation Dilemmas
Michelle Scott
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




MED-7 Aiming Right for Cost and Quality: Transforming Our Multilingual Program
Mursal Khaliif
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Take an introspective visual journey documenting the transformation of one of New England’s largest hospital-based interpreter services from "industry standard" to a nationally recognized model. At the heart of this transformation is the design of better systems to deliver hospital-based language services, each improvement guided by the alignment of human capital with technological advances. The speaker will demonstrate how hospital-based language services can make lasting and innovative contributions by achieving financial and operational improvement through small adjustments to service delivery. These adjustments increase patient satisfaction and improve health outcomes while reducing waste.


MED-8 Interpreting in Mental Health Settings: Strategies for Success
Sasha Carrillo
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Within the specialized context of mental health interpreting, interpreters perform best when they prepare appropriately for the interpreting session, seamlessly manage flow and clarification, as well as exercise a keen sense of self-awareness during the encounter. This session is intended for advanced medical/health care interpreters who wish to consider additional strategies to incorporate into their interpreting practice. Attendees will gain a better understanding of the challenges and rewards of interpreting in mental health settings.


MED-9 NEW SESSION
The Demographic Field Worker as an Interpreter
Clarissa Surek-Clark
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Verbal autopsy is a widely known method used for epidemiological and vital registry purposes by demographic surveillance sites throughout the developing world. While the interview may be conducted in local languages, the information collected in the survey instrument is often in English or other colonial languages. Based on field work conducted in a variety of sites in Sub-Saharan Africa, this session will focus on the role of the field worker as an interpreter, including the challenges faced and the solutions that are applicable to medical interpreters.


Medical T&I
Related Sessions

F-6 Translating for Global Health

F-7 May Cause Dizziness: What French<>English Translators Should Know About Drug Delivery and Formulation

I-8 Interpreting with CLAS: Cultural and Linguistically Appropriate Services

K-2 How to Prepare English>Korean Medical Translations

K-4 Pharmaceutical Clinical Study: Fundamentals of Korean>English Translation

LSC-5 The Secrets of Marketing Your Services to Health Care Clients

S-1 "Yes, I Touched Her Down There": Interpreting for Victims and Sex Offenders

S-11 The Scientifically Approved Term Is Not Always the Best Option: The Challenges of Translating at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

S-13 "I Haven't Had My Sex Reassignment Surgery Yet": Interpreting for Gender-Non-Conforming Patients

S-15 Public Health and Social Media

ST-4 Risk Analysis for Medical Devices

ST-5 Vaccines: Past, Present, and Future

Science & Technology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

ST-1 Voyage to Antarctica: Translating the Environment
Ana Salotti
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

This session will focus on the challenges of translating environmental issues. What does it mean to work as a translator for intergovernmental organizations devoted to wildlife conservation? This session will immerse nature enthusiasts and technical translators alike in a fascinating underwater world of krill, whales, icefish, penguins, and albatrosses. Through the lens of Antarctic fishing, attendees will learn about our delicate environmental balance and the conservation efforts made by the international community. By the end of the session, attendees will not only be better equipped to translate texts about conservation, they will also know why Antarctica is such a cool place. Examples in Spanish will be provided.


ST-2 The Turbine Engine: An Introduction to Modern Aircraft Propulsion Systems
Nicholas Hartmann
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

This illustrated session discusses turbine engines and the civil aircraft on which they are installed, from small turboprops to the giant turbofans used on intercontinental wide-body airliners. Attendees will learn about fluid coupling principles, bypass ratios, materials engineering challenges, and much more. Although the primary focus will be the engines themselves, background information will also be provided on atmospheric physics, the fundamentals of powered flight, airframe design and construction, and the infrastructure and economics of commercial air travel.


ST-3 How to Read and Translate Risk and Safety Vernacular Phrases in Technical Texts
Matthew Schlecht | Salvador Virgen
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Numbered R-phrases (risk phrases) and S-phrases (safety phrases) are among the most ubiquitous text units encountered in chemical documentation. They occur in chemical, analytical, and manufacturing procedures, cargo statements, product brochures, and customs declarations. Yet many translators are not aware of the official set translations that employ established and accepted terminology. This session will cover the risk and safety phrases in the context of the standardization bodies working on them, the emergency response measures and equipment covered, right-to-know regulations, and point to resources for the terminology in English, Spanish, French, German, and Japanese.


ST-4 Risk Analysis for Medical Devices
Joanne Archambault
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

We live in a world full of risks, and the consequences of these risks may be benign or deadly. Risk analysis, or hazard assessment, is a structured tool for evaluating problems that could occur with the use of a variety of items (e.g., cars, drugs, and medical devices). Risk analysis is now performed routinely during the design validation phase for medical devices. After reviewing the ISO 14971 risk management standard, the speaker will lead attendees through the risk analysis and risk evaluation process for a sample medical device.


ST-5 Vaccines: Past, Present, and Future
Tapani Ronni
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

Vaccination (immunization) has had a huge positive impact on public health. Although many infectious diseases are no longer an ongoing concern, many challenges remain, such as cold chain problems and antigenic variability of pathogens. The big remaining targets are AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. Ongoing advances in biotechnology should improve the safety and efficacy of vaccines. The speaker will discuss several of these advances, including systems biology, structural antigen design, and novel antigen delivery techniques.


ST-6 Bitcoin and Other Cryptocurrencies: Illegal Money or a New Global Payment Option?
Carola F. Berger
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Bitcoin has made headlines recently, as a means to finance illegal activities, as a vehicle for speculation, and as a new global peer-to-peer currency. The idea underlying Bitcoin solves the problem of how to prevent someone from spending electronic money more than once without a central intermediary. However, the revolutionary concept behind cryptocurrencies has a much larger potential than mere monetary exchange. This disruptive technology can also be used for applications such as smart contracts or even completely decentralized elections. The speaker will provide a basic introduction to these ideas. No advanced mathematical or cryptographical knowledge is needed.


ST-7 CANCELLED
Who Are You? Can You Prove It? Authentication Systems in the Information Age
Jennifer A. Baldwin
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




ST-8 A Lucrative Sideline: Editing Non-Native English Scientific Writing
Karen Tkaczyk
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

“The manuscript is poorly written and has too many grammatical and syntax errors. The results are very interesting from a practical standpoint, but the paper needs thorough revision to make it suitable for publication in The Journal of Astounding Scientific Developments.” Enter the native English-speaking editor. This session will describe what sets this work apart from translation or from editing texts written by native speakers, how to price it, and how to justify changes and handle authors’ egos when returning revised texts. We will conclude with a summary of what an efficient editing process might look like.


Science & Technology
Related Sessions

SEM-G Teach Your Text to Strip: Take It Off, Take It (Almost) All Off

LAW-3 The Road from Application to Issued Patent

P-3 ANACpedia: Online Dictionaries for Aviation Terminology in Portuguese, English, and Spanish

P-7 "Hardening" Your Information Technology Translation

S-9 Technical Translation and Interpreting for International Organizations

S-11 The Scientifically Approved Term Is Not Always the Best Option: The Challenges of Translating at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Translation
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

T-1 Translating the Sesame Street Way!
Helen Cuesta-Durand | Charo Welle
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English and Spanish)

Attendees will learn about the strategies that are employed to adapt the educational content from Sesame Street into other cultures. The speaker will integrate different Sesame Street multimedia platforms to demonstrate translation, dubbing, and editing techniques during the process of adaptation. Should you sacrifice text over content? Can you find a happy medium? Attendees will be encouraged to collaborate on exercises and share ideas on how to use these techniques in their translations. Join us and learn how the beloved Sesame Street characters interact with the U.S. Hispanic community!


T-2 CANCELLED
The Mystery of Transcreation
Mylene Vialard
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)




T-3 Transcreation and Translation for Marketing
Gabriela Lemoine
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; Advanced; Presented in: English)

One of the main reasons why companies need to translate is to sell their products to customers in other countries, which is why there is a lot of marketing content to translate. It's a very visible area and sales results are expected, so we need to understand what's expected of us as translators. This session will review what can be classified as marketing translation, what is transcreation, and what you need in order to do a successful transcreation job. The stages in a transcreation project, along with possible challenges and solutions, will also be discussed.


T-4 Translation: Most of Us Do It, but What Is It?
Daryl Hague | Geoffrey Koby | Arle Lommel | Alan Melby
(Friday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

We've all heard of translation and localization, but what is the relationship between the two? Is localization a type of translation, or vice versa? What about transcreation and summary translation? Don't forget raw machine translation. The panelists will explore various definitions of translation based on scope (broad to narrow) and specifications (which must apply absolutely to all projects, and which are relative to audience, purpose, and text type). The panelists will then suggest what practical difference various definitions of translation can make to translators and to ATA.


T-5 Software Localization Perspectives from a Translator, Project Manager, and Client
Eve Lindemuth Bodeux | Alfred Hellstern | Jose Palomares | Tess Whitty
(Friday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Software localization is a complex, exciting, and popular sub-specialty within the language industry, and more and more software gets localized each year. This session will provide a multi-faceted view of the localization process from the perspective of three key players: the translator, the project manager, and the client. This session will provide attendees with insight into the role of each of these individuals, along with what makes a localization project successful in spite of goals that often conflict.


T-6 CANCELLED
Quality Doesn't Matter Revisited
Renato Beninatto
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




T-7 CANCELLED
A Comprehensive Introduction to Proofreading
Carolyn Yohn
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




T-8 Reel Fun: Improving Your Subtitles
Ana Salotti
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Subtitling is an increasingly big market, but one that is often misunderstood. This session will provide novices with key aspects in subtitling to make their work both effective and unobtrusive. More experienced subtitlers will learn how to shake off bad habits developed after years of creating or correcting subtitles. Examples of subtitles in English and Spanish will be shown so that attendees can discuss possible solutions (and the rationale behind them).


T-9 Forget What You Learned in School: Make Your Writing More Lively
Percy Balemans
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The 19th-century Dutch author Multatuli once wrote, "I try my best to write lively Dutch. But I went to school." School is where we learned everything about grammar, but a grammatically correct text is not necessarily a good text. How do we turn it into a "lively" text that has the right style and tone of voice for the target audience and which readers actually want to read? The speaker will share some general advice on how to improve your writing, regardless of the language you translate into or write in.


T-10 Roads Less Taken
Joseph Mazza
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translation providers who branch out beyond the six official languages of the United Nations face a host of challenges. Recruiting pools shrink, print and Internet research sources dwindle, and quality control becomes more difficult. Or are these myths? How far beyond the "UN Six" can a quality-driven translation provider hope to go? Drawing from more than three decades in the language business, the chief of the State Department's Translating Division will offer a lively and interactive look at the world of translating these less common languages and the challenges, real and imaginary, that surround them. Come and celebrate language diversity!


T-11 How to Phrase Your Questions to Get the Answers You Need
Susanne Hempel
(Saturday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; Intermediate; Presented in: English)

A lack of context and the ambiguity of shorter text strings are two of the most challenging aspects for translators working in software localization. In both cases, translators typically submit questions to their clients. At the speaker's company, non-linguists (e.g., developers, project managers, clients) answer most of these queries. Statistics show that a quarter of the queries receive an unsatisfactory response. In many cases, phrasing the questions differently could have retrieved the needed answer. The speaker will discuss what types of queries the company receives, what information can be queried, and how to phrase a question to get a satisfactory answer.


T-12 Translators without Borders: Contributing to Humanitarian Work
Lori Thicke
(Saturday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Translators without Borders (TWB) is more than a nonprofit: it is a community. TWB has over 3,000 volunteers who use their language skills to help in humanitarian work. This community comes together to provide literally millions of words of translations each year to help nonprofit organizations, including Kiva, Action Against Hunger, Medecins sans frontières, and Oxfam. When disaster strikes, many diaspora translators provide crisis relief translations for their own countries. Because translation is also critical for democratizing access to knowledge, TWB has started another community initiative: training local language translators in Nairobi, Kenya. Attendees will learn more this and other projects.


T-13 NEW SESSION
Revision: A Love-Hate Job for Translators
Jonathan Hine
(Friday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Every professional translation deserves to be checked by a second translator before delivery. This is called revision. Only an experienced translator can do this job, but many translators will not take revision assignments. Teachers or certification exam graders may seem suited to the work, but professional revision is not the same as grading papers or exams. During this session, an experienced reviser will define revision and contrast it with activities that look like it but are not (e.g., editing, copyediting, proofreading, grading, and evaluating). This session will include tips on how to approach the revision task and how to price it.


T-14 NEW SESSION
Beyond Words
Maria Brau | Amanda Curry
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

What does translation in government settings involve? Translation work in intelligence agencies entails rendering audio sources and online exchanges, which are normally riddled with language variants and ad hoc lexical items. Translators must often decode without being able to seek clarification. Errors and missed deadlines entail security risks. The speakers will discuss how translator qualifications and practices are reviewed in these settings to reflect operational needs.


T-15 CANCELLED
Professional Generalists and Why We Need Them
Janet Golden
(Friday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)




T-16 NEW SESSION
Transcreation and Translation for Marketing
Gabriela Lemoine
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

One of the main reasons why companies need to translate is to sell their products to customers in other countries, which is why there is a lot of marketing content to translate. It's a very visible area and sales results are expected, so we need to understand what's expected of us as translators. This session will review what can be classified as marketing translation, what is transcreation, and what you need in order to do a successful transcreation job. The stages in a transcreation project, along with possible challenges and solutions, will also be discussed.


Translation
Related Sessions

SEM-G Teach Your Text to Strip: Take It Off, Take It (Almost) All Off

ET-3 Finding the Student's Inner Technologist: Best Practices for Teaching CAT Tools, Localization, and Terminology Online

T&I Industry
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TI-1 The Commission on Language: What It Means for ATA and Its Members
Bill Rivers
(Thursday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In 2014, the U.S. Congress asked the American Academy of Arts and Sciences to answer the following question: How does language impact the national interest? The Academy, having established a high-level commission of its fellows, reported to Congress in June 2016 on the ways that language impacts the fulfillment of the educational and cognitive potential of individuals, and how it matters for global security, economic growth, and social justice in the U.S. The speaker will update attendees on the progress of the commission.


TI-2 The ASTM International Translation and Interpreting Standards: Updated
Helen Eby | Alan Melby
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Thursday 2:00pm to Saturday 8:30am

The first version of the ASTM International translation standard was published in 2006. A partial revision was published in 2014. Now it is being revised from top to bottom to reflect the current status of the translation industry. The panelists will describe how this standard can be used for client education, project management, and developing structured translation specifications. Attendees will learn how they can get involved in the revision of this standard and vote on it.


TI-3 How Translators and Translation Companies Can Benefit from the ISO 17100 Translation Requirements Standard
Robin Bonthrone | Monika Popiolek | Peter Reynolds
(Thursday, 3:30pm-4:30pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

ISO 17100 provides requirements for the core processes, resources, and other aspects necessary for the delivery of a quality translation service that meets applicable specifications. The panel will explain what ISO 17100 is, why it's important, and how translators and translation companies can implement it. The focus will be on the practical implications and applications of the standard. Attendees will learn how the standard’s requirements affect processes and workflows, as well as how they can actually benefit from it.


TI-4 The Power of Collective Engagement: A Dynamic Forum on Being Heard, Contributing to Policy, and Making a Difference
Antonio E. Guerra
(Thursday, 2:00pm-3:00pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

CHANGE: Moved from Saturday 8:30am to Thursday 2:00pm

What are the real issues that affect us directly as linguists and what control can we exert over these? As individuals, we may feel powerless in our ability to have any influence in our organization or industry. Supported by current global and national language services marketplace statistics, standards, trends, and forecasts, the speaker will discuss how the linguistic community has the means of finding the power to thrive and be heard collectively. Beyond airing discontentment, this session will offer an interactive opportunity for attendees to share and discuss options and strategies for effective action and change for the benefit of all.


TI-5 Global Talent: What the Fortune 2000 is Looking for
Richard Brecht | Bill Rivers
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

In the summer of 2014, the Joint National Committee for Languages and the Michigan State University College Employment Research Institute surveyed more than 2,100 American mid- and large-sized businesses on their 2015 hiring plans in terms of linguistic and cultural human capital. More than 10% of the companies surveyed actively seek college graduates with language skills. Moreover, out of 10 skill areas, language/cultural skills were ranked third (after "soft skills" and general business skills). This session will offer a detailed analysis of the survey, including the demand for translation, interpreting, and localization skills, as well as the U.S. educational system's response to these demands.


TI-6 Translation and Language Skills: Giving You the Professional Edge
Kathleen Stein-Smith
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, careers in language services are projected to increase by 46%, much faster than the national average between 2012 and 2022. The median salary is also projected to be well above the national median salary. In the globalized world and an increasing globalized marketplace, language and translation skills can only be an advantage in terms of employment and career path. In addition, language and translation skills are increasingly useful in the marketplace and in our ability to navigate our own communities effectively.


Terminology
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

TRM-1 CANCELLED
Terminology Management: Where Do You Want to Take It?
Barbara Inge Karsch
(Saturday, 8:30am-9:30am; All Levels; Presented in: English)




TRM-2 Data About Data: Five Ideas to Make Metadata Speak for You
Laura Di Tullio
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; Advanced; Presented in: English)

Much like a library card catalog provides information about a book for which you are looking, metadata provide information about the terms in your term base. Yet, more often than not, the role of metadata is underestimated. The use of metadata is often limited, if not omitted altogether from term bases. Still, if used wisely, metadata can be instrumental to your work and literally “speak for you.” The speaker will discuss how to maximize the value of metadata using real-life case studies.


Terminology
Related Sessions

A-4 Methods of Creating and Introducing New Terms in Arabic

IT-2 Beyond Terminology Collections: Best Practices in Information Technology Terminology Work

LT-5 Solving Terminology Problems More Quickly with IntelliWebSearch

LT-6 Improve Your Workflow Using Spreadsheet and Macro Programs

Varia
Click on the speaker name to view bio.

V-1 Five Tips That Will Help You Sharpen Your Mental Edge as a Language Professional
Susan Barendregt
(Saturday, 10:00am-11:00am; All Levels; Presented in: English)

Nutrition is an often-neglected key to mental focus and a healthy brain. We exercise and try to get enough sleep, but frequently think of eating as simply a way to avoid feeling hungry. Nothing could be further from the truth. The brain depends on a steady supply of nutrients to function optimally, and consuming the wrong foods actually impairs its performance. The speaker will show you some simple steps to optimize your brain function so you will feel sharper in the interpreting booth and be able to tackle tough deadlines with focus and clarity.


V-2 An Alternative Tool to Help Linguists Release Anxiety
Giovana Boselli
(Saturday, 11:15am-12:15pm; All Levels; Presented in: English)

The speaker will discuss how the Emotional Freedom Technique can be used to deal with the anxiety (or fear) some professionals experience before an interpreting assignment, during a stressful project, or before an approaching deadline. After this session, attendees will have the information they need to use a simple but powerful tool to find the peace and confidence needed to achieve their goal. The session will include a 10-minute guided practice. Copies of the practice transcript will be available.


 
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