2000 Chronicle Index
(Feature Articles by Subject)

Agencies, Bureaus,
and Corporations


Organizations (worldwide)

Client Education

Public Relations
Community Outreach/
Professional Development


Resources

Conference Reports
(worldwide)

Subtitling

Independent
Contracting


Technology

Interpreting

Terminology
Languages

Transcription
Legal


Translator/Interpreter
Training and Pedagogy

Linguistic Theory

Voice-over
Literary

MONTHLY COLUMNS

Localization




MISCELLANEOUS/
ASSOCIATION-RELATED
NEWS

Medical


 
   

Agencies, Bureaus, and Corporations

Fielding a Complaint: Managing Negative Feedback from a Client—The Agency Perspective. Chip Keith. 29:30 Jan. (See Client Education)

We all like to think of ourselves as seasoned professionals, but regardless of how professional you are, mistakes will happen. Following the complaint resolution techniques mentioned in this article will give you a more rounded view of what occurred in a given situation and may, in the long run, save your contract.

Top 10 Traits of Good Translators or how to perform nearly perfectly in the unlikely event that you are not already doing so (in the eyes of an agency coordinator). Patricia Propst. 29:14 April. (see Independent Contracting)

Practical tips about what one agency translator coordinator finds helpful when developing and maintaining smooth working relationships with translators.

Professional Expectations: Perspectives from Both Translation Companies and Independent Translators. Jeffrey Hoffmann. 29:35 Sept. (see Independent Contracting)

The 2000 ATA Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida will include a session entitled "Dialogue with a Panel of Translation Company Managers," for which I will be one of the panelists. One segment of this dialogue will address professional expectations before a project begins, from both the translation company’s perspective and from the viewpoint of the independent translator. This article provides an outline of the key expectations to be discussed at the session, and explains why this is an important and relevant topic for discussion.

Top 10 Traits of Good Agencies. Amy Russell. 29:31 Sept. (See Client Education)

Ten suggestions for agencies to make working with translators easier and more mutually enjoyable.

The Conscientious Translator/Editor—Are you doing your job? Eva Berry-Gruby, Mary Majkowski, and Lucien Morin. 29:43 Sept. (see Client Education; Independent Contracting)

A three-way discussion between a client, a translator/editor, and a manager of a translation company on the subject of being a conscientious translator and editor. Topics include when not to accept a job and what you should be doing when you do accept an assignment.

What Translation Companies Need from Translators. R.F. Derick Bonewitz. 29:23 Nov./Dec. (see Independent Contracting)

Freelance translators should know what translation companies expect of them. At the ATA Annual Conference in Orlando, a panel of four translation company owners and managers discussed what they want from translators and how translators should evaluate the business relationship.


Client Education

Is the Customer Really Always Right? Robert France. 29:28 Jan.

Be wary of the bilingual customer insisting on a "literal" translation. The objective of the translator's task is to convey the meaning faithfully, but not in the exact words when a verbatim rendering would fail to communicate the meaning accurately, or if the result would sound strange. The truly excellent translation not only accurately conveys the meaning, but sounds as though it had been originally written in the target language.

Fielding a Complaint: Managing Negative Feedback from a Client—The Agency Perspective. Chip Keith. 29:30 Jan. (See Agencies, Bureaus, and Corporations)

We all like to think of ourselves as seasoned professionals, but regardless of how professional you are, mistakes will happen. Following the complaint resolution techniques mentioned in this article will give you a more rounded view of what occurred in a given situation and may, in the long run, save your contract.

Insights on Conference Interpreting. Lucia Conti. 29:20 Feb. (see Interpreting)

This article includes a technical description of the working conditions and techniques used in conference interpreting. Also discussed is the importance of professionalism and ethical conduct and communication with conference organizers.

Transparency Pays—For Clients and Translators. Chris Durban. 29:26 June.

Translators frequently regale each other with tales of poor decisions by customers and resulting damage in terms of market share or image, yet only rarely make these stories accessible to a wider public. As a result, business users of translation have little opportunity to learn from other people’s mistakes.

Give Me Five! Pointers to Professional Technical Translation. John Rock. 29:30 June.

The types of pointers that translators should provide to their clients are largely a matter of common sense. However, asking clients to use common sense when they know nothing about translation is somewhat begging the question. Didactic guidelines, like checklists, should contain simple instructions that clients can develop one step at a time as their translation requirements evolve. Here are a few pointers to good translation.

In Pursuit of the Cheapest Translation Cost

Is translation still a service or has it become a commodity? Johannes Tan. 29:27 Sept.

In the annals of management science, it is well understood that making the best choice at each stage of a process may not yield the best global solution. By applying this principle in the translation business, it is clear that assigning a translation project to the cheapest translator or translation company does not necessarily translate into the cheapest translation cost. As a matter of fact, there are usually many hidden costs—both tangible and intangible.

 Top 10 Traits of Good Agencies. Amy Russell. 29:31 Sept. (See Agencies, Bureaus, and Corporations)

Ten suggestions for agencies to make working with translators easier and more mutually enjoyable.

The Conscientious Translator/Editor—Are you doing your job? Eva Berry-Gruby, Mary Majkowski, and Lucien Morin. 29:43 Sept. (see Agencies, Bureaus, and Corporations; Independent Contracting)

A three-way discussion between a client, a translator/editor, and a manager of a translation company on the subject of being a conscientious translator and editor. Topics include when not to accept a job and what you should be doing when you do accept an assignment.

Proofreading Translations: A Checklist, Not A Blank Check. Dena Bugel-Shunra. 29:12 Oct. (see Independent Contracting)

After a translation is completed, the next step is proofreading. Whether you commission your own proofreader or your client takes care of that side of the transaction, you can spare yourself a lot of grief if you put together a list of proofreading requirements and submit it with the translation.


Community Outreach/Professional Development

Why, Where, When, and How to Donate Translation and Interpretation Services. Sara Koopman. 29:22 Aug.

Donating your services can give you a jolt of inspiration, along with low-cost, feel-good marketing. It can also be a great way to live your ideals and focus and develop your career. Cast your net wide with a variety of organizations and choose your projects wisely. Use these opportunities to create ideal working conditions.

10 Top Tips for a Top-notch Translation Résumé. Eve Lindemuth Bodeux. 29:23 Aug.

As you prepare for the upcoming ATA Annual Conference in Florida, keep these tips for a top-notch résumé in mind.


Conference Reports (Worldwide)

Do We Speak Science? The 14th Annual Conference of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting in London. Jim Honeychuck. 29:23 June.

The 14th Annual Conference of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting in London on the theme "Do We Speak Science?" featured speakers addressing the question of what it takes to be a good translator of scientific, technical, or medical texts. In addition, some of the profession’s most knowledgeable experts on medical interpretation, software localization, and machine translation shared their research and gave useful advice.


Independent Contracting

As Tough as it GetsCBut How Tough? Leon McMorrow. 29:24 March.

The ability to assess the difficulty of a particular job is one of the Atrade secrets@ that is developed unconsciously with translation experience. It is very useful for accepting/declining jobs, determining readiness for an ATA accreditation examination, negotiating the best price with a client, and especially for building self-esteem and a professional reputation. But how does one develop this ability?

The Translator as Global Contractor. Marga Hannon. 29:29 March.

Individual translators are increasingly becoming global contractors. This can be lucrative, but also poses a new set of challenges.

Editing and Proofreading for Translators. Josephine Bacon. 29:13 April. (See Literary; Localization)

Proofreading and editing are fine when you know your client well, and when the client is in direct contact with you and has confidence in your abilities. Unfortunately, in so many instances of proofreading translations, this is not the case.

Top 10 Traits of Good Translators or how to perform nearly perfectly in the unlikely event that you are not already doing so (in the eyes of an agency coordinator). Patricia Propst. 29:14 April. (see Agencies, Bureaus, and Corporations)

Practical tips about what one agency translator coordinator finds helpful when developing and maintaining smooth working relationships with translators.

The Spiritual Technology of Translation. Dena Bugel-Shunra. 29:34 April.

We choose our profession because of our fluency with words, but in our daily work, we must temper and even silence that spirit so as not to disrupt the communication intended by our clients. In the process of learning that inner silence, our work bestows upon us a discipline akin to that of a mystic: the discipline of translation. This article discusses the spiritual discipline of translators, the benefits we reap by submitting to it, and some methods we can use to focus ourselves on it.

Is This Still Worth It? An Update. Jonathan Hine. 29:18 Aug.

In February 1998, the Chronicle published an article about building a business budget and calculating a break-even point for a freelance business. In an update to that article, Jonathan Hine provides some additional thoughts about pricing for partners and teams, whether to use source or target text in pricing, and charging for additional services.  

Evolution of the Translator’s Role and Mission. Marie C. Martien. 29:44 Aug.

As our world moves toward globalization, the need for translation has considerably increased. Because globalization relies upon successful communication across cultures, our profession has evolved, requiring a different approach to our role, our skills, as well as our mission. We must take on the role of consultant, educator, communicator, and global ambassador and move away from the traditional isolationist mentality of our profession in order to meet these needs. We have to become aware of the evolutionary cycle from translator, to communicator, to global ambassador. Chances are, freelancing may be a successful framework to bettering our role as communication facilitators in the new global environment.

How Not to Get Hired. Riccardo Schiaffino. 29:32 Sept.

Whether you are looking for a job as a staff translator or offering your services as a freelancer, it is very important to make a good first impression. That means knowing which mistakes to avoid in your communications with your prospective employer or customer. This article indicates some of the pitfalls to avoid and offers suggestions on how best to present yourself.

Professional Expectations: Perspectives from Both Translation Companies and Independent Translators. Jeffrey Hoffmann. 29:35 Sept. (see Agencies, Bureus, and Corporations)

The 2000 ATA Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida will include a session entitled "Dialogue with a Panel of Translation Company Managers," for which I will be one of the panelists. One segment of this dialogue will address professional expectations before a project begins, from both the translation company’s perspective and from the viewpoint of the independent translator. This article provides an outline of the key expectations to be discussed at the session, and explains why this is an important and relevant topic for discussion.

Doing the Translation Can Be Easier than Collecting the Money. Karin Adamczyk and Steven M. Geller. 29:37 Sept.

Procedures that anyone can follow to score a prospective client's credit worthiness, and some suggestions on what to do when a payment is late. These are simple methods the authors use to identify potentially troublesome accounts that can help freelancers anywhere gather information and avoid collection problems.

The Conscientious Translator/Editor—Are you doing your job? Eva Berry-Gruby, Mary Majkowski, and Lucien Morin. 29:43 Sept. (see Agencies, Bureaus, and Corporations; Client Education)

A three-way discussion between a client, a translator/editor, and a manager of a translation company on the subject of being a conscientious translator and editor. Topics include when not to accept a job and what you should be doing when you do accept an assignment.   

Proofreading Translations: A Checklist, Not A Blank Check. Dena Bugel-Shunra. 29:12 Oct. (see Client Education)

After a translation is completed, the next step is proofreading. Whether you commission your own proofreader or your client takes care of that side of the transaction, you can spare yourself a lot of grief if you put together a list of proofreading requirements and submit it with the translation.

What Translation Companies Need from Translators. R.F. Derick Bonewitz. 29:23 Nov./Dec. (see Agencies, Bureaus, and Corporations)

Freelance translators should know what translation companies expect of them. At the ATA Annual Conference in Orlando, a panel of four translation company owners and managers discussed what they want from translators and how translators should evaluate the business relationship.


Interpreting

Court Interpreters Join Communications Workers of America. Tony Roder. 29:18 Jan.

Parlance in the European Union. Louis Korda. 29:17 Feb.

The Eastern European governments are in their 24th hour to get started on an intensive EU interpreter training program.

Translating for Interpreters. Cynthia Migueléz. 29:20 Feb.

This article, written for novice interpreters with little or no formal training, provides a basic overview of some well-established translating strategies that, when learned and routinized, can enhance general interpreting skills.

Insights on Conference Interpreting. Lucia Conti. 29:20 Feb. (see Client Education)

This article includes a technical description of the working conditions and techniques used in conference interpreting. Also discussed is the importance of professionalism and ethical conduct and communication with conference organizers.

Interpreting Evidentiary Tape Recordings: The Toughest Job You=ll Ever Love, or Maybe Not. Diane E. Teichman. 29:26 Feb. (see Legal; Transcription)

The transcription and translation of foreign-language tape recordings is one of the duties included in the scope of legal interpreting. It is difficult work, as it is extremely time-consuming, requires serious concentration, and the source tape is often of questionable quality. I must be nuts because I have loved this work ever since, when over 12 years ago, I was handed my first whisper-ridden, undercover tape with the audio quality of a Victrola phonograph record.

The Role of Medical Interpreters. Cecilia Garcia. 29:30 Feb. (see Medical)

Today=s medical interpreter must be multi-faceted in order to respond effectively when the medical staff says Ajust fix it, please.@

Towards Meaningful, Appropriate, and Useful Assessment: How the False Dichotomy Between Theory and Practice Undermines Interpreter Education. David Burton Sawyer. 29:32 Feb. (see Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

In interpreter education programs for the spoken languages, much work remains to be done to establish meaningful, appropriate, and useful forms of assessment. Since not all interpreter trainers are familiar with research and may not be aware of what it has to offer, the potential of measurement and testing theory to improve assessment practices remains under-appreciated. In this article, the author reiterates the centrality of an integrated assessment regime in a system of instruction, and discusses cornerstones of these practices in the context of interpreter education. Widespread problems that undermine interpreter assessment are presented in an attempt to heighten awareness and stimulate discussion.

Miss Interpreter Speaks: On Meaning, Meaninglessness, and Emptiness. Laura E. Wolfson 29:42 Feb.

Health Care InterpretingCAn Emerging Discipline. Cynthia E. Roat. 29:18 March. (see Medical)

Medical interpreting, or health care interpreting as it is sometimes called, is just emerging as the most recent discipline among the interpreting professions. In this article, the current state of medical interpretation in the U.S. is described and future trends identified.

The Development of a Comprehensive Interpreter Certification Program. Danyune Geertsen and Nataly Romero. 29:13 June (see Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

What do you get when you combine industry-specific training, performance review, and expert-validated assessment? Geertsen and Romero detail one company’s journey toward creating a comprehensive certification program for over-the-phone interpretation.

The Application of Mnemonic Devices to Interpreter Training. Sheng-Jie Chen. 29:60 (See Japanese)

Researchers generally agree that memory, especially short-term memory, plays a monumental role in both interpretation and interpreter training, but little research has been available for teaching memory enhancement systematically. This article, based on data derived mainly from two studies (a Taiwan case study and a southwestern U.S. case study I conducted), attempts to bridge the gap by introducing six mnemonic techniques for interpreter training: gist words, charting, pegging, pictorialization, the location method, and absurdity. This article then introduces a method for testing the interpreter's ability to recall information, and offers suggestions to facilitate the teaching of a memory enhancement class.

How to Get Better Reception: From Hors D’oeuvres to Chef D’oeuvres. By Laura E. Wolfson. 29:66 Sept.

Miss Interpreter discusses the ins and outs of interpreting at an event basic to all conferences: the stand-up reception or cocktail party.

The Challenges of Working as a Court Interpreter in Germany. Barbara M. Mueller-Grant. 29:23 Oct. (see German; Legal)

The work of a court interpreter in criminal cases in Germany is interesting, but can be very frustrating for beginners. One reason for this is that in most of the Laender (states), there are few possibilities available for learning or improving the skills interpreters need for the job. The following article focuses on the situation in the state of Hessen. Topics include the qualifications and procedure for becoming a court interpreter, the criminal courts (the players, status, selection, and role of court interpreters, as well as the working conditions), and other employers of sworn interpreters. Finally, the role of the German Interpreters and Translators Association in providing forums for discussion, opportunities for further education, and trying to improve conditions for court interpreters and translators will also be discussed.

Teacher Education for the Interpretation and Translation Classroom. Jacolyn Harmer. 29:37 Nov./Dec. (see Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

As the demand for skilled translators and interpreters continues to rise, so will the demand for graduates who have been thoroughly taught—and so will the demand for outstanding teachers. The Monterey Institute of International Studies Graduate School of Translation and Interpretation plans to launch a certificate course to help meet that demand.

Interpretation Pedagogy: A Bridge Long Overdue. Claudia Angelelli. 29:40 Nov./Dec. (see Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

The nature of the field of translation and interpretation studies suggests a puzzle formed by interdisciplinary field pieces such as cross-cultural communication, sociology, anthropology, sociolinguistics, bilingualism, second language acquisition, cognitive psychology, and social psychology, among others. However, the bulk of literature and research on the aptitudes, pedagogy, and assessment of interpreters remains in the hands of experts in the field, increasing the risk of not having an interdisciplinary approach. This review of the literature, though limited in scope, suggests a need for more interdisciplinary work in order to open a closed circle and foster a deeper understanding of the development of professionals by moving out of the "sink or swim" methodology.

Interpreters in the News. S. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 29:58 Nov./Dec.

And you thought you had a bad day…


Languages

Arabic Finnish Norwegian Portuguese
Creole French Japanese Russian
Chinese German Maya Spanish
Danish Italian Polish Swedish
Yiddish

(Arabic)

When Silence is not Golden. Salma Zakaria. 29:47 Feb.

Translation and the case of EgyptAir Flight 990.

Arabic Websites on the Internet. Salma Zakaria. 29:51 Feb. (see Internet Resources)

Here is a list of helpful online resources for those interested in the Arabic language.

In God We Trust. Jackie Murgida. 29:53 Feb.

Colloquial Arabic has dozens of formulaic expressions—set phrases that are used in a wide variety of situations. They are often misinterpreted or translated in a misleading way, and translators must be extra vigilant to avoid knee-jerk, literal renderings of these sayings, some of which have religious components that can be overstated. One of them was the subject of intense media speculation after the crash of EgyptAir Flight 990 last year.

Translation between Arabic and English: Points of

Language and Style. Taysir Nashif. 29:23 May.

Certain grammatical rules and stylistic practices govern the translation of the verbal noun (al-masdar), prepositions and specification (tamyiz) between English and Arabic, and of the active participle (the prefix "dis-" and "would") from English into Arabic.

(Creole)

Creole: Made in the Americas. S. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 29:25 May.

There is more to creole than just cooking.

(Chinese)

A Short Note on Contemporary Chinese Terminology. Jessie Lu. 29:45 April.

Translating contemporary Chinese terminology requires creative thinking and current knowledge of the Chinese language. The development of new technology and a globalized economy has presented a great challenge to Chinese translators. This article is an attempt to open a discussion regarding how to deal with new terms and concepts in Chinese translation.

How Chinese Incorporates Foreign Words. Jim Honeychuck. 29:47 April.

Chinese is one of the languages which found itself without its own native vocabulary for modern scientific and technical terms. Being a non-alphabetic language, and one with far fewer allowable sound combinations, the Chinese language faced quite a challenge. Nevertheless, Chinese techniques for incorporating foreign words are perhaps more consistent and easier to follow than those of some European languages.

Learning in the Changing World (Continued). Dave Chen. 29:49 April.

This is a supplement to the article published in the June 1997 issue. In addition to what was mentioned previously, the current article emphasizes two ways to learn and cope with the constantly changing world.

(Danish)

Danish Translators in a Global Market. Philip Shaw. 29:41 June.

Translation is everywhere in Denmark, and Danes translate everything, both ways. But English is difficult to deal with because of all its variations, and so it has a highly critical audience in Denmark. When English is the official language of a Danish company, the translator’s sense of culture is stretched to the limits.

How the Danes Saved the Letter "ae". Else Mogensen. 29:46 June.

When it was decided that all the written characters in the world were to be given a name under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization and the International Electrotechnical Commission, the "ae" was named a ligature and not a letter. The Nordic countries protested and argued successfully for the unique change of status of "ae" from ligature to letter.

(Finnish)

Longfellow: Poet, Polyglot, Translator—but Plagiarizer? Melvin J. Luthy. 29:37 June. (see Literary)

Shortly after the publication of the Finnish Kalevala 150 years ago, a controversy raged in the English-speaking world over whether Henry Wadsworth Longfellow had plagiarized from that work when he wrote The Song of Hiawatha. This article reviews some of the claims and counter-claims of plagiarism, and illustrates some of the reasons why Longfellow was accused of that offense.

(French)

Translating Equity Research: Breaking into French>English Financial Translation. Robert Killingsworth. 29:32 Jan.

"Equity research" is a fancy name for financial analysts’ reports on publicly traded companies. A financial center like Paris generates a daily torrent of such reports, which must be made available in English if they are to reach international investors. The knowledge needed to translate this material is broad rather than deep, and the most useful research for the translator is reading an English-language business newspaper.

Opportunities for Using French in the World of Publishing. Berkeley Frank. 29:38 Jan. (see Literary)

If your translation business is in a lull, one way to increase assignments and establish contacts is to apply French in the domain of book publishing.

A Review of "Leaving No Footprints: More Hazards of French-English Translation. Alison Sondhaus Carroll. 29:39 Jan.

A brief overview of Lillian Clementi's recent conference presentation on the grammatical and stylistic distinctions between English and French, which highlighted some of the challenges in converting abstract French into convincing and concrete English. Topics included common pitfalls ranging from typography to grammar to style, with special emphasis on the idiomatic use of verbs and prepositions. The presenter's insights on the subject are helpful to both the French>English translator and native Francophones writing in English.

Translation in a French Research Institute: Creation of Terminology Tools for Translators. Annik Bouroche and Michèle Le Bars. 29:45 Jan. (see Terminology)

Developments in the world of science and technology go together with an ever-expanding body of specialized vocabulary created to designate new concepts. This vocabulary frequently cannot be found in the available print or electronic dictionaries. Translators working in a research institute, such as the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), face difficulties in understanding and translating specialized vocabulary. These translators, always careful to use the exact terms so as to ensure that all communication is unambiguous, have developed an activity of thematic terminology. The methodology used is based on analyzing a large set of original scientific documents in two or three languages and collaborating with field specialists. Furthermore, in order to simplify the process of compiling specialized vocabulary, translators at the INRA have tested a software program designed to extract terminology automatically. The results of their efforts can be found in a number of published specialized dictionaries and in their own terminological database.

Of Literary Note: Interview with Madeleine Velguth about her translations of French novelist Raymond Queneau. Jo Anne Engelbert. 29:58 July. (see Literary)

Les grands enfants. S. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 29:48 Aug.

The counterpart to the American stereotype of the French as snooty is the French view of Americans as "overgrown children"—cute, but so terribly uninhibited.

(German)

Style Issues in the Translation of Biopharmaceutical Texts from German into English. Christian Schmitz. 29:37 March. (see Medical)

While the translation industry often invests considerable resources into terminology management for large-volume projects, the importance of establishing a set of well-defined style rules is often overlooked. This article offers project managers and translators a starting point for identifying pertinent style rules in the translation of medical and biopharmaceutical texts from German into English.

"Sprachliches Kleingeld": The Translation of Proverbs and Proverbial Expressions in German/English Context. Dorothee Racette. 29:42 March.

Proverbial or fixed structures make up a large part of metaphorical language. Since German and English use widely differing cultural metaphors and source materials for their proverbial lore, appropriate translation can be a challenge, particularly when it comes to word games and advertising slogans. The following presents a discussion of different approaches to translating proverbial material, and features a bibliography of helpful resources.

Musings on the Translation of German Literature. Leslie Willson. 29:45 March. (see Literary)

Personal reflections on how one translator came to realize that he was called to translate, and how he trudged the arduous and compelling path to published translations. The importance of impudent initiative and salutary good fortune, links to publishers and authors, the translator as the author=s agent, and resources for translators young and old are also discussed.

Translating for an International Journal in the Protective Coatings Industry. Dieter Wältermann. 29:28 April.

Translating and editing texts from an international clientele in the protective coatings industry demands expertise in several technical areas. In addition to a vast array of technical knowledge, any successful translator must possess the appropriate linguistic knowledge in order to be able to translate such materials to quality standards. This article features central issues related to the publication and translation process and to core terminology in the protective coatings industry, as well as to the quality of translations in this field.

Contemporary German Poetry and English Translation. Ingo R. Stoehr. 29:15 May. (See Literary)

The 20th century has been good for poetry written in German; indeed, contemporary German-language poetry is vibrant. This poetry is accessible to an American audience, both in the original German and in English translation. The translation of poetry, however, is always a challenge because it is not just interpretation but also experimentation. 

The Challenges of Working as a Court Interpreter in Germany. Barbara M. Mueller-Grant. 29:23 Oct. (see Interpreting; Legal)

The work of a court interpreter in criminal cases in Germany is interesting, but can be very frustrating for beginners. One reason for this is that in most of the Laender (states), there are few possibilities available for learning or improving the skills interpreters need for the job. The following article focuses on the situation in the state of Hessen. Topics include the qualifications and procedure for becoming a court interpreter, the criminal courts (the players, status, selection, and role of court interpreters, as well as the working conditions), and other employers of sworn interpreters. Finally, the role of the German Interpreters and Translators Association in providing forums for discussion, opportunities for further education, and trying to improve conditions for court interpreters and translators will also be discussed.

(Italian)

Wills and Estates in Italy. Marica Pariante Angelides. 29:15 Oct. (see Legal)

This article will answer the following questions: 1) According to Italian law, when is an Italian will valid?; and 2) Can an American citizen living abroad challenge an Italian will? At the same time, the article will also give an Italian version of the most relevant legal terms a translator is likely to encounter.

Concision in Technical Translations from English into Italian. Roberto Crivello. 29:17 Oct.

A few methods and suggestions on pruning wordiness in technical translations from English into Italian.

Italian Translations: To edit and how to edit—this is the question. Carmela Pacchioni. 29:29 Oct.

Nowadays, editors are in big demand in the Italian translation market, and almost no translation company would simply take a text from a translator and deliver it to the client without at least proofreading or editing it. Nonetheless, editing is a very broad concept worth discussing in detail so as to prevent misunderstanding and unpleasant surprises.

(Norwegian)

The Challenges of Subtitling. Jan Emil Tveit. 29:43 June. (see Subtitling)

With a particular view to the wide variety of text types and terminologies of the profession, the present article outlines some of the main challenges of subtitling. It focuses on the translation of culture-specific concepts and discusses the difficulty involved when the subtitler does not have adequate insight into the subject matter he or she is handling.

Four Recent Norwegian-English Dictionaries. Louis Janus. 29:48 June.

A short summary of four relatively recent dictionaries for translating between Norwegian and English. Three are print-based and one is on computer diskette. Prices are in Norwegian kroner.

(Japanese)

Translating and Editing a Bilingual Online Magazine. Alan Gleason. 29:47 Sept. (See Literary)

The Book & The Computer (Hon to Konpyuta) is a bilingual online journal that explores the future of the printed word. The magazine, which appears on a dual Website (www.honco.net) in Japanese and English, is managed by editorial offices in Tokyo and Berkeley, California. The author has worked as a translator, editor, and inter-staff coordinator for the journal since its inception in 1998.

Planting Mushrooms: Globalizing and Internationalizing Document Production in Japanese Companies. Tim Hallett. 29:52 Sept. (see Localization)

The international documentation efforts of Japanese companies are often hampered by ineffective and out-of-date methods and thinking. A new simultaneous approach to translation is required to succeed in today’s market.

Taming the Dragon: Handling Complex Sentences in Japanese Patents. Jon Johanning. 29:56 Sept. (see Legal)

Japanese sentences can be long and complex (especially in patents), and differences in word order and grammar between Japanese and English often result in frustrating translation problems. A simple technique for solving these problems efficiently is demonstrated with a practical example.

The Application of Mnemonic Devices to Interpreter Training. Sheng-Jie Chen. 29:60 Sept. (See Interpreting)

Researchers generally agree that memory, especially short-term memory, plays a monumental role in both interpretation and interpreter training, but little research has been available for teaching memory enhancement systematically. This article, based on data derived mainly from two studies (a Taiwan case study and a southwestern U.S. case study I conducted), attempts to bridge the gap by introducing six mnemonic techniques for interpreter training: gist words, charting, pegging, pictorialization, the location method, and absurdity. This article then introduces a method for testing the interpreter's ability to recall information, and offers suggestions to facilitate the teaching of a memory enhancement class.

Translating Semiconductor Equipment Documents: Growing Demand for Business Opportunities. Ken Sakai. 29:64 Sept.

With the growing worldwide Internet information age, demand and supply for semiconductor devices are increasingly strong and diversified. In order to make a sophisticated microchip, such as Intel’s Pentium® microprocessor, semiconductor equipment becomes a most critical element for the long and complicated manufacturing process.

(Maya)

Reclaiming a Literary Voice: Translation and Repatriation of Maya Literature. Susan Rascón. 29:53 Nov./Dec. (see Literary)

This article includes a brief discussion of the history of Maya literature. It then describes recent attempts to reclaim a literary voice through the production of literature in Mayan languages, the translation and repatriation of books written about the Maya by scholars from other countries, and multilingual publications of books by Maya authors. It includes descriptions of the author’s participation in several projects.

(Polish)

Polglish: A Valid Sublanguage or a Horrifying Unacceptable Deviation? Olgierda Furmanek. 29:50 July.

Polish-speaking immigrant communities in the U.S. have developed a language that cannot be understood by Poles from Poland. This article attempts to classify the linguistic borrowings taking place and searches for the reasons for this situation. What does it imply to a translation/interpreting professional?

(Portuguese)

Regaining Meaning. Catarina Edinger. 29:49 May. (see Literary)

By critiquing a translation into Portuguese of a short story by John Steinbeck, the article focuses on the translation of apparently simple constructions which are loaded with thematic or stylistic implications. It also discusses expressions that differ in Continental and Brazilian Portuguese. Should we have two Portuguese translations, one for each set of readers?

Pronouns are Here to Stay: Linguistic Change in Brazilian Portuguese. Clarissa Surek-Clark. 29:27 Aug.

Those who currently speak Brazilian Portuguese are gradually adopting the use of overt subject pronouns into their speech. This article examines the phenomenon, in both spoken and written forms of Brazilian Portuguese, and its impact on translation.

From Breast of Judge to an Abiding Conviction: Current Portuguese-English Legal Dictionaries. Arlene M. Kelly. 29:30 Aug. (see Legal)

After recommending dictionaries for students, I began to read them more carefully. I discovered that despite several editions of the two major bilingual Portuguese-English legal dictionaries, errors from earlier editions remain in later ones. This is a dangerous situation for students and novices who accept the authority of faulty dictionaries.

The Joys of Jô: Translating A Samba for Sherlock and Twelve Fingers. Clifford E. Landers. 29:36 Aug. (see Literary)

Translating two novels by the well-known Brazilian talk show host and comedian Jô Soares presented considerable challenges. Puns, jokes, and more subtle expressions of humor all demanded ingenuity, flexibility, and what Brazilians call jogo de cintura in order for the comedy not to fall flat in the translation. This article discusses specific problems encountered in O Xangô de Baker Street (published by Panetheon in 1997 as A Samba for Sherlock) and O Homem que Matou Getúlio Vargas (forthcoming).

Reading Between the Headlines: Some Challenges in Journalistic Translation. Lucia Leao and Clarisse Bandeira de Mello. 29:40 Aug. (see Literary)

Tips for the translator of journalistic texts…into Portuguese.

(Russian)

Literary Translation: Self-expression or Self-effacement? Nora Seligman Favorov. 29:24 July. (see Russian)

In reviewing the presentations of the panel commemorating the bicentennial of the birth of Aleksandr Pushkin, the author was struck by the underlying current of the four presentations, all of which were on quite different subjects relating to Pushkin translation. The act of literary translation, one that is by definition an act of self-effacement, is also a vehicle for expressing something completely new and original.

From English to Russian and Back. Kenneth Katzner. 29:28 July.

Putting together a dictionary that bridges two languages is not simply a matter of translating words like "giraffe" or "geranium." For instance, have you ever tackled the word "point"? Kenneth Katzner’s English-Russian Russian-English Dictionary, based on American English, is one of the most widely used in the U.S. today. This article was adapted from a paper he delivered at the ATA Annual Conference last November.

English–Russian/Ukrainian Terms for Administrative Units. Vadim Khazin. 29:32 July.

Various renderings of administrative divisions are discussed for two directions: a) from English (U.S. terms) into Russian and Ukrainian, and b) from Russian and Ukrainian into English—this last category also includes some similar terms referring to other ex-Soviet Republics. Special emphasis is placed upon such controversial terms as county, borough, and township, among others. Some results of a poll conducted among Slavic translators are given.

A Column of One’s Own: Five Years of SlavFile Lite. Lydia Razran Stone. 29:35 July. (see Literary)

"SlavFile Lite" is a humor and cultural column that appears regularly in SlavFile, the newsletter of ATA’s Slavic Languages Division. This article contains excerpts from the last five years of the column.

Labels, Tags, Stickers, etc. Igor Vesler. 29:40 July.

This article presents a brief historical overview of the infiltration of foreign words into the Russian language. A number of examples are given where the incorrect or inappropriate use of a word, or the mere transposition of an English term, has created funny or derogatory results.

Romantic Unreformed: Vladimir Nabokov’s Literalness Within Russian and Western Translation Theories. Julia Trubikhina. 29:43 July. (see Literary)

Discussing Vladimir Nabokov within the problematics of translation is, in my opinion, to challenge Nabokov’s status as a uniquely "Western" phenomenon within the Russian literary tradition. His unusual evolution in literary translation—from free translations or adaptations to his obsession with literalism—is, as I will attempt to demonstrate, indeed a full circle within the tradition, and an unfaltering romantic approach accounting for diametrically opposite practical results.

U.S. Government Assistance Programs for Scientists in the Newly Independent States of the Former Soviet Union. Dennis W. Wester. 29:53 July.

In this article, assistance programs sponsored by the U.S. government for scientists in the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union are reviewed. The programs carried out by the U.S. Agency for International Development; International Science and Technology Center; Cooperative Threat Reduction Program; Material Protection, Control, and Accounting Program; International Nuclear Safety Program; Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention Program; Nuclear Cities Initiative Program; and the Special American Business Internship Training Program are described.

(Spanish)

Singular Concerns. S. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 29:13 March.

You would think that something as seemingly universal as adding an As@ or Aes@ to make a plural would apply systematically to both English and Spanish, especially since they are, after all, members of the same Indo-European family of languages. But there are also instances where a singular in English is properly rendered in the plural in Spanish and vice versa, not to mention a number of irregular plurals in English that even have native speakers confused.

The Spanish Language Division: Going on Four Years of Growth. Alicia S. V. Marshall. 29:26 May.

As the new millennium rolls on, the Spanish Language Division continues to grow in number and to thrive in activities and enthusiasm.

Agreeing to Disagree. Paul Coltrin. 29:28 May.

Agreement in number and gender is one of the most fundamental aspects of Spanish grammar. And it seems such a simple matter. Unfortunately, it not always is.

Spanish Spelling Reforms: Accents. Margarita Friedman. 29:32 May.

This article describes the two new rules on written accents published in the 1999 edition of the Ortografía de la lengua española, Edición revisada por las Academias de la Lengua Española (Real Academia Española). It will review the old rules in order to provide the reader with a better understanding of the changes that have taken place. Examples of words with confusing spellings will be provided to illustrate how the new rules apply.

Professing Our Spirit—Three Common Assumptions When Translating English into Spanish: Research into Meaning versus Form. Marian B. Labrum. 29:37 May.

Three frequently asked questions when translating from English into Spanish have to do with meaning versus form. Poor translations from English into Spanish often reveal that the translator seems to follow the form of the source language text (English), rather than the meaning and appropriate form of the target language (Spanish). Consequently, certain translations don’t "sound" right, and the target audience of these translations is frequently confronted with a "third language."

Translating Neologisms in Spanish Technical Texts: New Meanings for Old Words. Daniel Linder. 29:41 May.

Spanish technical texts are full of neologisms created by assigning new meanings to old words. Unlike English, Spanish allows multiple terms to take on a single new meaning. Spanish>English translators have to sort through this proliferation of terms and translate them as a single exact term in English.

The Departamento de Español Urgente of the Agencia EFE: History and Objectives. Alberto Gómez Font, Translated by Alicia S. V. Marshall. 29:43 May.

The Departamento de Español Urgente was established in 1980 by the Spanish news bureau Agencia EFE. It is the first organization devoted to monitoring the use of Spanish, and the only consulting entity that provides advice about the correct usage of Spanish. EFE's goals: unifying linguistic criteria between Spain and the Spanish-speaking countries of the Americas, fighting the onslaught of foreign terms bombarding Spanish, adopting guidelines for the Spanish transliteration of proper names originating from other languages with non-Latin alphabets, and solving linguistic problems confronted in the drafting of news articles. A tangible result of the Departamento de Español Urgente has been the Manual de Español Urgente, a publication already in its 12th edition, which compiles recommendations on the correct usage of Spanish so necessary for the media. Its purpose is to help avoid linguistic errors, to clarify doubts, and, in these times of great technical inventions that are inevitably coupled by linguistic innovations, to offer consistent criteria for the use of neologisms.

How Well Do Your Technical Dictionaries Suit You and Your Translating/Interpreting Needs? Daniel Linder. 29:20 (See Technology [General])

If you have dictionaries that are dog-eared from use and others that stay brand new for years, that probably means something. Here is a method for examining dictionaries and exercising self-awareness. Use it to determine how suitable technical dictionaries are for your style/workload.

Bond Clauses in Spanish Contracts: A Brief Overview. Leland D. Wright, Jr. 29:39 Oct. (see Legal)

The article discusses the various types of bond clauses found in Spanish-language contractual documents and the reasons for their existence. It introduces the most commonly used Spanish terms and phraseology and their English counterparts, illustrated by excerpts taken from a number of Latin American texts that the author has translated over the years. Finally, it offers suggestions on how to deal with different kinds of translation problems confronted by translators of Spanish legal texts.

(Swedish)

Mission Impossible—Monty Python in Swedish? Monica Scheer. 29:35 Oct. (see Subtitling)

What happens when an entirely new kind of humor, and foreign on top of that, befalls Swedish television viewers? How does the translator cope in a subtitling country like Sweden where translation already has two kinds of restrictions: limitations of space and time?

(Yiddish)

What a Difference a Word Makes: Yiddish Connotation in Isaac Bashevis Singer’s "Gimpel the Fool." Lillian Schanfield. 29:51 Oct. (see Literary)

This article compares the influential 1953 English translation by Saul Bellow to Isaac Bashevis Singer’s 1945 Yiddish text, which uses two different Yiddish words for the English "fool"—tam and narr, arguing that the burden of the story lies in the distinction between these two connotative words. It suggests that Gimpel, the "fool" character, actually wills his own credulity by subscribing to a non-empirical definition of reality—a Platonic or Kabbalistic conceptualization of material and spiritual realms. This leads to the conclusion that the story is about the nature of faith. Brief consideration is given to several differences that might have occurred in this translation as a result of the passage of 50 years, during which time we have seen increasing celebration of ethnic differences in American culture and literature.

Legal

Interpreting Evidentiary Tape Recordings: The Toughest Job You=ll Ever Love, or Maybe Not. Diane E. Teichman. 29:26 Feb. (see Interpreting; Transcription)

The transcription and translation of foreign-language tape recordings is one of the duties included in the scope of legal interpreting. It is difficult work, as it is extremely time-consuming, requires serious concentration, and the source tape is often of questionable quality. I must be nuts

because I have loved this work ever since, when over 12 years ago, I was handed my first whisper-ridden, undercover tape with the audio quality of a Victrola phonograph record.

From Breast of Judge to an Abiding Conviction: Current Portuguese-English Legal Dictionaries. Arlene M. Kelly. 29:30 Aug. (see Portuguese)

After recommending dictionaries for students, I began to read them more carefully. I discovered that despite several editions of the two major bilingual Portuguese-English legal dictionaries, errors from earlier editions remain in later ones. This is a dangerous situation for students and novices who accept the authority of faulty dictionaries.

Taming the Dragon: Handling Complex Sentences in Japanese Patents. Jon Johanning. 29:56 Sept. (see Japanese)

Japanese sentences can be long and complex (especially in patents), and differences in word order and grammar between Japanese and English often result in frustrating translation problems. A simple technique for solving these problems efficiently is demonstrated with a practical example.

Wills and Estates in Italy. Marica Pariante Angelides. 29:15 Oct. (see Italian)

This article will answer the following questions: 1) According to Italian law, when is an Italian will valid?; and 2) Can an American citizen living abroad challenge an Italian will? At the same time, the article will also give an Italian version of the most relevant legal terms a translator is likely to encounter.

The Challenges of Working as a Court Interpreter in Germany. Barbara M. Mueller-Grant. 29:23 Oct. (see German; Interpreting)

The work of a court interpreter in criminal cases in Germany is interesting, but can be very frustrating for beginners. One reason for this is that in most of the Laender (states), there are few possibilities available for learning or improving the skills interpreters need for the job. The following article focuses on the situation in the state of Hessen. Topics include the qualifications and procedure for becoming a court interpreter, the criminal courts (the players, status, selection, and role of court interpreters, as well as the working conditions), and other employers of sworn interpreters. Finally, the role of the German Interpreters and Translators Association in providing forums for discussion, opportunities for further education, and trying to improve conditions for court interpreters and translators will also be discussed.

Bond Clauses in Spanish Contracts: A Brief Overview. Leland D. Wright, Jr. 29:39 Oct. (see Spanish)

The article discusses the various types of bond clauses found in Spanish-language contractual documents and the reasons for their existence. It introduces the most commonly used Spanish terms and phraseology and their English counterparts, illustrated by excerpts taken from a number of Latin American texts that the author has translated over the years. Finally, it offers suggestions on how to deal with different kinds of translation problems confronted by translators of Spanish legal texts.

Legal Translation: A Personal Perspective. Enéas Theodoro Jr. 29:43 Oct.

This is a personal view of legal translation by someone with many years of experience in this field who has learned many tough lessons. This experience is reflected in some theoretical and practical musings which focus on the U.S. and Brazilian legal systems.

Forensic Transcribing and Translating: Who Should Perform the Work? Sandro Tomasi. 29:46 Oct. (see Transcription)

This article presents a brief case law history of how transcriptions are allowed into court procedures. Outlined in the article are the steps that have been taken by the courts to ensure accurate transcription/translation documents. Conclusions are made, based on the case law reviewed, as to who should perform transcription/translation work.

Linguistic Theory

Fossil DNA, the Perfect Language, and the Internet. Roberto Arcangeli (English translation by Anne Milano Appel). 29:20 Oct.

The hunt for the fossil DNA of Indo-European languages: the nth attempt to exhume the "perfect language." A fruitless endeavor since linguistic diversity is not divine retribution, but the successful result of human evolution.

Literary

Opportunities for Using French in the World of Publishing. Berkeley Frank. 29:38 Jan. (see French)

If your translation business is in a lull, one way to increase assignments and establish contacts is to apply French in the domain of book publishing.

Strong Men Coldly Slain: A Machine Translation Case Study. Neil L. Inglis. 29:44 Feb. (see Technology [Machine Translation])

How machine translation interprets Rudyard Kipling.

Musings on the Translation of German Literature. Leslie Willson. 29:45 March. (see German)

Personal reflections on how one translator came to realize that he was called to translate, and how he trudged the arduous and compelling path to published translations. The importance of impudent initiative and salutary good fortune, links to publishers and authors, the translator as the author=s agent, and resources for translators young and old are also discussed. 

Editing and Proofreading for Translators. Josephine Bacon. 29:13 April. (See Independent Contracting; Localization)

Proofreading and editing are fine when you know your client well, and when the client is in direct contact with you and has confidence in your abilities. Unfortunately, in so many instances of proofreading translations, this is not the case.

Sources for Translation Theory: Fiction in Latin America. Adriana S. Pagano. 29:38 April.

This article deals with theorization on translation by Latin American writers and translators. It argues for the incorporation of fictional-theoretical parameters into the study of translation processes. Drawing on the work of three contemporary Latin American writers and translators, the article discusses their insights into translation, focusing on their use of fiction and other literary genres as a medium to problematize stabilized notions frequently appearing in translation discussions (such as the concept of mother tongue and foreign language and the notion of binary equivalence between language pairs). Through a reading of Hector Bianciottis, Milton Hatoums, and Eduardo Lizaldes autobiographical novels, short stories, and poems, the notions of desire and pleasure are introduced as a component of the translation process.

Contemporary German Poetry and English Translation. Ingo R. Stoehr. 29:15 May. (See German)

The 20th century has been good for poetry written in German; indeed, contemporary German-language poetry is vibrant. This poetry is accessible to an American audience, both in the original German and in English translation. The translation of poetry, however, is always a challenge because it is not just interpretation but also experimentation.

Notes of a Bilingual Writer. Grady Miller. 29:19 May.

Few authors have dared to translate their own works. Even those endowed with a good knowledge of other languages have recoiled from the task. From the vantage of 12 years of experience writing in two languages, the author of these notes talks about the perils and advantages of being one’s own translator.

Regaining Meaning. Catarina Edinger. 29:49 May. (see Portuguese)

By critiquing a translation into Portuguese of a short story by John Steinbeck, the article focuses on the translation of apparently simple constructions which are loaded with thematic or stylistic implications. It also discusses expressions that differ in Continental and Brazilian Portuguese. Should we have two Portuguese translations, one for each set of readers?

Of Literary Note: Marian Schwartz on Translating Nina Berberova. Jo Anne Engelbert. 29:55 May.

Longfellow: Poet, Polyglot, Translator—but Plagiarizer? Melvin J. Luthy. 29:37 June. (see Finnish)

Shortly after the publication of the Finnish Kalevala 150 years ago, a controversy raged in the English-speaking world over whether Henry Wadsworth Longfellow had plagiarized from that work when he wrote The Song of Hiawatha. This article reviews some of the claims and counter-claims of plagiarism, and illustrates some of the reasons why Longfellow was accused of that offense.

Literary Translation: Self-expression or Self-effacement? Nora Seligman Favorov. 29:24 July. (see Russian)

In reviewing the presentations of the panel commemorating the bicentennial of the birth of Aleksandr Pushkin, the author was struck by the underlying current of the four presentations, all of which were on quite different subjects relating to Pushkin translation. The act of literary translation, one that is by definition an act of self-effacement, is also a vehicle for expressing something completely new and original.

A Column of One’s Own: Five Years of SlavFile Lite. Lydia Razran Stone. 29:35 July. (see Russian)

"SlavFile Lite" is a humor and cultural column that appears regularly in SlavFile, the newsletter of ATA’s Slavic Languages Division. This article contains excerpts from the last five years of the column.

Romantic Unreformed: Vladimir Nabokov’s Literalness Within Russian and Western Translation Theories. Julia Trubikhina. 29:43 July. (see Russian)

Discussing Vladimir Nabokov within the problematics of translation is, in my opinion, to challenge Nabokov’s status as a uniquely "Western" phenomenon within the Russian literary tradition. His unusual evolution in literary translation—from free translations or adaptations to his obsession with literalism—is, as I will attempt to demonstrate, indeed a full circle within the tradition, and an unfaltering romantic approach accounting for diametrically opposite practical results.

Of Literary Note: Interview with Madeleine Velguth about her translations of French novelist Raymond Queneau. Jo Anne Engelbert. 29:58 July. (see French)

The Joys of Jô: Translating A Samba for Sherlock and Twelve Fingers. Clifford E. Landers. 29:36 Aug. (see Portuguese)

Translating two novels by the well-known Brazilian talk show host and comedian Jô Soares presented considerable challenges. Puns, jokes, and more subtle expressions of humor all demanded ingenuity, flexibility, and what Brazilians call jogo de cintura in order for the comedy not to fall flat in the translation. This article discusses specific problems encountered in O Xangô de Baker Street (published by Panetheon in 1997 as A Samba for Sherlock) and O Homem que Matou Getúlio Vargas (forthcoming).

Reading Between the Headlines: Some Challenges in Journalistic Translation. Lucia Leao and Clarisse Bandeira de Mello. 29:40 Aug. (see Portuguese)

Tips for the translator of journalistic texts…into Portuguese.

Translating and Editing a Bilingual Online Magazine. Alan Gleason. 29:47 Sept. (See Japanese)

The Book & The Computer (Hon to Konpyuta) is a bilingual online journal that explores the future of the printed word. The magazine, which appears on a dual Website (www.honco.net) in Japanese and English, is managed by editorial offices in Tokyo and Berkeley, California. The author has worked as a translator, editor, and inter-staff coordinator for the journal since its inception in 1998.

Of Literary Note: Interview with Clifford Landers. Jo Anne Engelbert. 29:70 Sept.

What a Difference a Word Makes: Yiddish Connotation in Isaac Bashevis Singer’s "Gimpel the Fool." Lillian Schanfield. 29:51 Oct.

This article compares the influential 1953 English translation by Saul Bellow to Isaac Bashevis Singer’s 1945 Yiddish text, which uses two different Yiddish words for the English "fool"—tam and narr, arguing that the burden of the story lies in the distinction between these two connotative words. It suggests that Gimpel, the "fool" character, actually wills his own credulity by subscribing to a non-empirical definition of reality—a Platonic or Kabbalistic conceptualization of material and spiritual realms. This leads to the conclusion that the story is about the nature of faith. Brief consideration is given to several differences that might have occurred in this translation as a result of the passage of 50 years, during which time we have seen increasing celebration of ethnic differences in American culture and literature.

Of Literary Note: English into English: Seamus Heaney on Translating Beowulf. Jo Anne Engelbert. 29:63 Nov./Dec.

Once a literary work enters the canon, it cannot be touched. However, for reasons that are far from clear, each new generation of readers demands a fresh translation. Seamus Heaney’s discussion of his new verse translation of Beowulf sheds light on the phenomenon.

Reclaiming a Literary Voice: Translation and Repatriation of Maya Literature. Susan Rascón. 29:53 Nov./Dec.

This article includes a brief discussion of the history of Maya literature. It then describes recent attempts to reclaim a literary voice through the production of literature in Mayan languages, the translation and repatriation of books written about the Maya by scholars from other countries, and multilingual publications of books by Maya authors. It includes descriptions of the author’s participation in several projects.

Localization

Editing and Proofreading for Translators. Josephine Bacon. 29:13 April. (See Independent Contracting; Literary)

Proofreading and editing are fine when you know your client well, and when the client is in direct contact with you and has confidence in your abilities. Unfortunately, in so many instances of proofreading translations, this is not the case.

Localization, Internationalization, Globalization, and Translation. Tim Altanero. 29:47 May.

Localization, internationalization, and globalization are defined and examined in an article outlining the history and practice of localization in the high tech industry.

Globalizing Websites: Challenges and Opportunities for Translators. Alex Pressman. 29:14 July.

Even though today more than one half of Web users reside outside of the U.S., 78 percent of Web pages are still only in English. As the Web becomes more global, these billions of pages of text, computer code, and graphics images need to be adapted to the needs of global markets. This enormous amount of content localization represents a tremendous opportunity for translators who are interested in working on Web-related projects.

Terminology Management in the Software Industry. Ulrike Irmler, Barbara Roll, and Ursula Schwalbach. 29:17 July.

Software companies that rely on translation to prepare products for a global marketplace can no longer afford to treat the localization of software, documentation, and Websites as an afterthought to the development process. Terminology management and standardization are central to getting it right from the start.

Planting Mushrooms: Globalizing and Internationalizing Document Production in Japanese Companies. Tim Hallett. 29:52 Sept. (see Japanese)

The international documentation efforts of Japanese companies are often hampered by ineffective and out-of-date methods and thinking. A new simultaneous approach to translation is required to succeed in today’s market.

Medical

The Role of Medical Interpreters. Cecilia Garcia. 29:30 Feb. (see Interpreting)

Today=s medical interpreter must be multi-faceted in order to respond effectively when the medical staff says Ajust fix it, please.@ 

The Translator=s Dilemma: Communicating Medical Terminology. Clancy J. Clark. 29:14 March.

With recent trends in the development of national standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services in health care, there is an increased need for trained interpreters and translators. To meet this demand, The Cross Cultural Health Care Program developed and translated a medical glossary series in Amharic, Somali, Spanish, Tigrigna, and Vietnamese. The article discusses the challenge of translating medical terminology when direct linguistic equivalents do not exist, and how these translated medical glossaries accommodate for this difficulty.

Medical Translation: A Physician's View. Oliver French. 29:21 March.

Medical translation covers a vast field of knowledge that would prove impossible, even for a physician, to encompass. Yet, a botched medical translation can hurt patients. A physician turned translator suggests solutions for problems he has encountered when trying to ensure that the final translation is a clear and safe rendition of the source text.

Health Care InterpretingCAn Emerging Discipline. Cynthia E. Roat. 29:18 March. (see Interpreting)

Medical interpreting, or health care interpreting as it is sometimes called, is just emerging as the most recent discipline among the interpreting professions. In this article, the current state of medical interpretation in the U.S. is described and future trends identified.

Style Issues in the Translation of Biopharmaceutical Texts from German into English. Christian Schmitz. 29:37 March. (see German)

While the translation industry often invests considerable resources into terminology management for large-volume projects, the importance of establishing a set of well-defined style rules is often overlooked. This article offers project managers and translators a starting point for identifying pertinent style rules in the translation of medical and biopharmaceutical texts from German into English.

Organizations (worldwide)

The New Zealand Society of Translators and Interpreters: A Catalyst for the Profession. Sabine Fenton. 29:51 Nov./Dec.

A brief overview of the history of the New Zealand Society of Translators and Interpreters and its current state of affairs.


Public Relations

A House Without Mirrors. Manouche Ragsdale. 29:16 Feb.

With the help of the ATA Board of Directors, the ATA Public Relations Committee will launch a program to educate, inform, and Atrain@ T&I users in order to help interpreters and translators build a long-overdue public image.

ATA Public Relation Program: Members Provide Everglades Website Translation. 29:15 Nov./Dec.

Resources

Dictionaries and Beyond. Eric A. Bye. 29:59 Nov./Dec.

Sometimes our sophisticated dictionaries let us down. Helpful alternative resources can be found in unexpected forms, including specialized sales material and junk mail. Here are some ways to cope with elusive terminology that dictionary compilers have overlooked.

Subtitling

Screen Translation: Is Subtitling "The Intelligent Solution"? Jan Emil Tveit. 29:51 Jan.

A number of the Hollywood film productions of the 1990s have become huge worldwide successes. In Europe, people queued up in record numbers to see James Cameron’s Titanic. Likewise, Steven Spielberg’s films have done extremely well on this side of the Atlantic, and a substantial part of the $914-million worldwide gross of Jurrasic Park has been cashed in on the European continent. The linguistic adaptation of foreign films and television productions is a crucial factor, giving translators more work and an increasingly important role to play. One has to get the message across to viewers who do not understand English well enough. The merits of the two main screen translation approaches will be discussed with a particular view to films, television news, and commercials. Is one approach more "intelligent" than the other?

The Challenges of Subtitling. Jan Emil Tveit. 29:43 June. (see Norwegian)

With a particular view to the wide variety of text types and terminologies of the profession, the present article outlines some of the main challenges of subtitling. It focuses on the translation of culture-specific concepts and discusses the difficulty involved when the subtitler does not have adequate insight into the subject matter he or she is handling.

Mission Impossible—Monty Python in Swedish? Monica Scheer. 29:35 Oct. (see Swedish)

What happens when an entirely new kind of humor, and foreign on top of that, befalls Swedish television viewers? How does the translator cope in a subtitling country like Sweden where translation already has two kinds of restrictions: limitations of space and time?

Technology

(General)

How Well Do Your Technical Dictionaries Suit You and Your Translating/Interpreting Needs? Daniel Linder. 29:20 (See Spanish)

If you have certain dictionaries that are dog-eared from use and others that stay brand new for years, that probably means something. Here is a method for examining dictionaries and exercising self-awareness. You can use it to determine how suitable technical dictionaries are for your style and workload.

(Internet Resources)

Arabic Websites on the Internet. Salma Zakaria. 29:51 Feb. (see Arabic)

Here is a list of helpful online resources for those interested in the Arabic language.

(Machine Translation)

Strong Men Coldly Slain: A Machine Translation Case Study. Neil L. Inglis. 29:44 Feb. (see Literary)

How machine translation interprets Rudyard Kipling.

Translation Research Using a Computer-Aided Think-Aloud Protocol: An Update. Geoffrey S. Koby. 29:21 April. (see Transcription)

This article reports on progress on a research project involving translators translating on a computer while thinking aloud. A computer daemon records keystrokes, while videotape records speech and action. At present, keystroke analysis is essentially complete, while the transcription of videotape continues.

(Software Reviews)

Microsoft Office 2000—An Overview. Tim Altanero. 29:19 June.

Microsoft released its latest version of Office about six months ago, but should you upgrade?


Terminology

Translation in a French Research Institute: Creation of Terminology Tools for Translators. Annik Bouroche and Michèle Le Bars. 29:45 Jan. (see French)

Developments in the world of science and technology go together with an ever-expanding body of specialized vocabulary created to designate new concepts. This vocabulary frequently cannot be found in the available print or electronic dictionaries. Translators working in a research institute, such as the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), face difficulties in understanding and translating specialized vocabulary. These translators, always careful to use the exact terms so as to ensure that all communication is unambiguous, have developed an activity of thematic terminology. The methodology used is based on analyzing a large set of original scientific documents in two or three languages and collaborating with field specialists. Furthermore, in order to simplify the process of compiling specialized vocabulary, translators at the INRA have tested a software program designed to extract terminology automatically. The results of their efforts can be found in a number of published specialized dictionaries and in their own terminological database.

Educational Documents: Translation or Evaluation? George Fletcher. 29:32 March. (see Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

This article is based on questions posed to the author during a session at the 1999 ATA Annual Conference in St. Louis, Missouri. Some of the answers to the participants' questions were subsequently researched, and the additional information was integrated into this article.

Terminology Work: Tools and Processes that Make a Difference. Uwe Muegge. 29:15 April. (See Chinese)

Terminology work is at the core of almost any translation job. As this is a time-consuming and expensive process, it is imperative to use the most efficient tools and methods available. This article focuses on solutions for rapidly building terminology databases from legacy translations and printed resources.

Governance and Governability: Evolving Concepts. S. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 29:51 April.

"Governance," defined as how power is exercised in the management of a country's economic and social resources for development, is a relatively new buzzword in development circles.

Buen provecho and bon appétit: Enjoying your meal is good advice. S. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 29:51 June.

Of language, culture, and waistlines.

Transcription

Increase Your Earnings, Try Transcription. Paul R. Sadur. 29:43 Jan. (see Voice-over)

If your computer is not powerful enough to handle voice recognition software or you lack the patience to train it, give transcription a try. It just may fatten your bank account.

Interpreting Evidentiary Tape Recordings: The Toughest Job You=ll Ever Love, or Maybe Not. Diane E. Teichman. 29:26 Feb. (see Interpreting; Legal)

The transcription and translation of foreign-language tape recordings is one of the duties included in the scope of legal interpreting. It is difficult work, as it is extremely time-consuming, requires serious concentration, and the source tape is often of questionable quality. I must be nuts

because I have loved this work ever since, when over 12 years ago, I was handed my first whisper-ridden, undercover tape with the audio quality of a Victrola phonograph record.

Translation Research Using a Computer-Aided Think-Aloud Protocol: An Update. Geoffrey S. Koby. 29:21 April. (see Machine Translation)

This article reports on progress on a research project involving translators translating on a computer while thinking aloud. A computer daemon records keystrokes, while videotape records speech and action. At present, keystroke analysis is essentially complete, while the transcription of videotape continues.

Forensic Transcribing and Translating: Who Should Perform the Work? Sandro Tomasi. 29:46 Oct. (see Legal)

This article presents a brief case law history of how transcriptions are allowed into court procedures. Outlined in the article are the steps that have been taken by the courts to ensure accurate transcription/translation documents. Conclusions are made, based on the case law reviewed, as to who should perform transcription/translation work.

Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy

Translation + Computers in an Academic Setting: A Report on a Visit to Leeds. Carolyn Quintero. 29:54 Jan.

The past decade has seen a huge expansion in the worldwide demand for translation. The computer component in translating is increasingly more powerful and sophisticated, and at the same time, the academic discipline of translation studies has blossomed. These two phenomena have produced a wealth of new insights into the complexities of the translation process. And the University of Leeds is doing something about it.  

Towards Meaningful, Appropriate, and Useful Assessment: How the False Dichotomy Between Theory and Practice Undermines Interpreter Education. David Burton Sawyer. 29:32 Feb. (see Interpreting)

In interpreter education programs for the spoken languages, much work remains to be done to establish meaningful, appropriate, and useful forms of assessment. Since not all interpreter trainers are familiar with research and may not be aware of what it has to offer, the potential of measurement and testing theory to improve assessment practices remains under-appreciated. In this article, the author reiterates the centrality of an integrated assessment regime in a system of instruction, and discusses cornerstones of these practices in the context of interpreter education. Widespread problems that undermine interpreter assessment are presented in an attempt to heighten awareness and stimulate discussion.

Educational Documents: Translation or Evaluation? George Fletcher. 29:32 March.

This article is based on questions posed to the author during a session at the 1999 ATA Annual Conference in St. Louis, Missouri. Some of the answers to the participants' questions were subsequently researched, and the additional information was integrated into this article.

The Development of a Comprehensive Interpreter Certification Program. Danyune Geertsen and Nataly Romero. 29:13 June (see Interpreting)

What do you get when you combine industry-specific training, performance review, and expert-validated assessment? Geertsen and Romero detail one company’s journey toward creating a comprehensive certification program for over-the-phone interpretation.

Preaching What We Practice: Professional Translator Training at Kent State University. Faculty members of the Kent State University Institute for Applied Linguistics. 29:25 Nov./Dec.

Professional Translator Training: A Student Perspective. Students of the Kent State University Institute for Applied Linguistics. 29:31 Nov./Dec.

Teachers' Forum in Orlando. Gertrud Graubart Champe. 29:35 Nov./Dec.

Teachers met as a group on two occasions at the recent ATA Annual Conference in Orlando, drawn together by their common interests.

Teacher Education for the Interpretation and Translation Classroom. Jacolyn Harmer. 29:37 Nov./Dec. (see Interpreting)

As the demand for skilled translators and interpreters continues to rise, so will the demand for graduates who have been thoroughly taught—and so will the demand for outstanding teachers. The Monterey Institute of International Studies Graduate School of Translation and Interpretation plans to launch a certificate course to help meet that demand.

Interpretation Pedagogy: A Bridge Long Overdue. Claudia Angelelli. 29:40 Nov./Dec. (see Interpreting)

The nature of the field of translation and interpretation studies suggests a puzzle formed by interdisciplinary field pieces such as cross-cultural communication, sociology, anthropology, sociolinguistics, bilingualism, second language acquisition, cognitive psychology, and social psychology, among others. However, the bulk of literature and research on the aptitudes, pedagogy, and assessment of interpreters remains in the hands of experts in the field, increasing the risk of not having an interdisciplinary approach. This review of the literature, though limited in scope, suggests a need for more interdisciplinary work in order to open a closed circle and foster a deeper understanding of the development of professionals by moving out of the "sink or swim" methodology.

Internships: Bridging the Gap from the Classroom to the Real World. Eileen Brockbank. 29:48 Nov./Dec.

According to Marian Greenfield, who served as moderator, this ATA conference session's purpose was to "get everyone talking to each other." By "everyone," she meant educators whose translation and interpretation programs offer internships, firms and institutions sponsoring internships, and students seeking internships. In this article, you will find specific information about several translation internships and read participants' comments on these programs. After reading it, you will have a better idea of the range of translation and interpretation internships currently being offered.

Voice-over

Increase Your Earnings, Try Transcription. Paul R. Sadur. 29:43 Jan. (see Transcription)

If your computer is not powerful enough to handle voice recognition software or you lack the patience to train it, give transcription a try. It just may fatten your bank account.


MONTHLY COLUMNS

Accreditation Forum

Miss Interpreter Speaks by Laura E. Wolfson
Dictionaries Reviews Compiled by Albert Bork

Of Literary Note By Jo Anne Engelbert
Letters to the Editor

The Translation Inquirer by John Decker
Humor and Translation by Mark Herman

 


(Accreditation Forum)

Behind the Scenes of an ATA Accreditation Exam. Mercedes Edgerton. 29:62 Feb.

ATA's Accreditation Program: Getting Ready for the New Millennium. Shuckran Kamal. 29:56 March.

On Accreditation: Standards, Criteria, Evaluation. Colette Kent. 29:58 April.

What it Takes to Be a Grader. 29:62 May.

Procedure for Establishing a New Language Combination within the ATA Accreditation Program. 29:58 June.

ATA's Accreditation: An International Candidate's Point of View. Mariana Landaverde. 29:64 July.

In Other Words: Literal Versus Non-literal Translation. Leland D. Wright, Jr. 29:56 Aug.

Examples of Common Errors on English into Spanish Exams. 29:73 Sept.

Accreditation Review Policy. 29:58 Oct.

When in Doubt, Check it Out. Leland D. Wright, Jr. 29:70 Nov./Dec.


(Dictionaries Reviews Compiled by Albert Bork)

For complete reviews of dictionaries published in 2000, please click on the Chronicle page option (located on the sidebar) and select Dictionary Reviews from the main menu listings.

ATA Scholarly Monograph Series

Translation and Medicine. American Translators Association Scholarly Monograph Series, Vol. X

Editor: Henry Fischbach. Publisher: Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company (215-836-1200). Hard cover, 195 pages. Publication Date: 1998. ISBN: 90 272 3185 0 (Eur) 1 55619 629 6 (U.S.). Price: $45; $25 for ATA members. Review by: Sharlee Merner Bradley. 29:52 April.

Translating Into Success. American Translators Association's Scholarly Monograph Series, Vol. XI

Editor: Robert C. Sprung. Publisher: (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Co.). Publication Date: 2000. Price: $24.95 (paperback); $50 (hardcover). Reviewed by: Leland D. Wright, Jr. 29:56 Oct.

English

Random House Webster's Dictionary of the English Language (CD-ROM)

Publisher: Random House. Price: $28. Reviewed by: Robert France. 29:56 May.

The Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors, 2nd edition Editor and Compiler: R. M. Ritter. Publisher: Oxford University Press: New York. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 0-19-866239-4. Price: $24.95 (cloth). Reviewed by: Kathy Bork. 29:65 Nov./Dec.

French

French Dictionary of Business, Commerce, and Finance on CD-ROM

Publisher: Routledge. Publication Date: 1998. Price: $135. (Available from regular suppliers, such as ibd.). Reviewed by: Sharlee Merner Bradley. 29:56 Jan.

Lexikon medizinisch-wissenschaftler Abkÿrzungen

Author: Rolf Heister. Publisher: Stuttgart/New York: Schattauer. Publication Date: 1998, 4th edition, NMP. Softcover, 450 pages. ISBN: 3-7945-1843-8. Reviewed by: Leon McMorrow. 29:57 Jan.

Termium® and Termium Plus® on CD-ROM in Windows 95 and Windows 98/NT versions.

Produced by: Translation Bureau of the Public Works and Government Services of Canada (Ottawa Ontario K1A 0S5, Canada). On the Internet at http://www.translationbureau.gc.ca. Price: $395 ($325 for update) in the U.S. Contact 800-TERMIUM. Reviewed by: Sharlee Merner Bradley. 29:49 March.

Termium Plus®

Produced by: Translation Bureau of the Public Works and Government Services of Canada (Ottawa Ontario K1A 0S5, Canada). On the Internet at http://www.translationbureau.gc.ca. Price: $395 ($325 for update) in the U.S. Contact 800-TERMIUM. Reviewed by: Françoise Herrmann. 29:50 March.

Le Petit Larousse Illustré 2000

Reviewed by: Françoise Herrmann

Routledge French Dictionary of Environmental Technology Dictionnaire anglais du génie de l’environnement

Publisher: Routledge, London and New York. Publication Date: 1997. ISBN: 0-415-13918-X. Reviewer By: Patricia Bobeck.

German

Routledge German Dictionary of Construction arterbuch Bauwesen], German-English; English-German

Publisher: Routledge. Publication Date: 1997. ISBN: 0-415-11242-7. Reviewed by: Loie Feuerle. 29:52 April.

Thieme Leximed Wörterbuch Zahnmedizin/Dictionary of Dentistry (English-German/German-English)

Authors: Peter Reuter, Christine Reuter. Publisher: Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart: New York. Publication date: 1999. ISBN: 3-13-117311-4. Price: EUR 75.67 (approx. $70). Availability: German online booksellers, such as amazon.de, buecher.de, buch.de, or bol.de. It does not actually seem to be available at major U.S. online booksellers, although some of them list it. No CD-ROM or online edition is available. Reviewed by: Per N. Dohler. 29:65 Nov.Dec.

Wörterbuch der Zahnmedizin und Zahntechnik (German-English/English-German)

Author: Herbert Bucksch. Publisher: Hüthig Zahnmedizin, MVH Medizinverlage Heidelberg. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 3-8394-5033-8. Price: EUR 126.80 (approx. $115). Availability: See Reuter/Reuter. Reviewed by: Per N. Dohler. 29:66 Nov./Dec.

Hungarian

Hungarian Treasury of Words: A Dictionary of Synonyms, Idioms, and Antonyms

Magyar Szókincstár Rokon értelm szavak, szólások és ellentétek szótára

Editor: Gábor Kiss. Publisher: TINTA Publisher, Budapest, 929 pages. Publication Date: 1999. ISBN: 963-85622-2-6. Available from: TINTA Könyvkiadó, Szatmárhegyi u. 13., H-1116 Budapest, Hungary; Tel: +(36-1)208-58-11; Fax: +(36-1)208-39-89; E-mail: kissgabo@mail.elender.hu. Reviewed by: Helen M. and John F. Szablya. 29:56 May.

Legal

Bieber’s Dictionary of Legal Citations

Author: Mary Miles Prince. Publisher: William S. Hein & Co., Inc. Publication Date: 1997. ISBN: 1-57588-285-X. Price: $39.50. Reviewed by: Tom West. 29:72 Sept.

World Dictionary of Legal Abbreviations

Author: Igor I Kavass and Mary Miles Prince. Publisher: William S. Hein & Co., Inc. Publication Date: 1994. ISBN: 0-89941-781-7. Reviewed by: Tom West. 29:72 Sept.

Portuguese

Elsevier's Dictionary of Drug Traffic Terms

(In English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, and German)

Author: Ninon Illanes. Publisher: Elsevier. Publication Date: 1997. ISBN: 0-444-81937-1. Price and Where Available: $215.50 (Currently available through online bookstores and from the publishers. Also on CD-ROM for $228.50 [ISBN: 0-444-50131-2]). Reviewed by: Arlene Kelly. 29:50 Aug.

Michaelis Moderno Dicionário da Língua Portuguesa

Editor: Weiszflog, Walter. Publisher: Melhoramentos de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Publication Date: 1998. IBSN: 85-06-02759-4. Price: $66.95 (Luso-Brazilian Books). Reviewed by: Daniel Tomlinson. 29:51 Aug.

Spanish

Multicultural Spanish Dictionary

Publisher: Schreiber Publishing. Publication Date: 1999. ISBN: 1-887563-45-8. Price: $24.95. Reviewed by: Tom West. 29:56 Feb.

The Writer’s Reference Guide to Spanish

Authors: David William Foster, Daniel Altamiranda, and Carmen de Urioste. Publisher: University of Texas Press, Austin, 304 pages. ISBN: 0-292-72511-6 (hardcover); 0-292-72512-4 (paperback). Price: $35 (hardcover); $16.95 (paperback). Reviewed by: Tony Beckwith. 29:49 March.


(Letters to the Editor)

A Matter of Perspective. Courtney Searls-Ridge. 29:10 Jan.

A Question of Phonetics. Jon Johanning. 29:11 Jan.

Response to "Danish—A Language with a Future? Gary Gilligan. 29:11 Jan.

Don't Stop Until You Get Enough. Jeffrey Adrian Oliveira Platts. 29:10 Feb.

Microsoft Blues Update. Salma Zakaria. 29:10 Feb.

Against Political Correctness and Censorship. Mark Herman. 29:12 March.

How to Create a Dictatorship. Mira S. Beerbaum. 29:12 April.

Awareness Raising: Unraveling the Coat of Invisibility Around Translators and Interpreters. Paul Perry. 29:13 May.

Ad-Hoc World Committee for Translation Awareness Open Letter to President Clinton. 29:13 May.

President Clinton Replies to ATA President. 29:25 Sept.

Fun-Farra Fun for All. Lilian N. Van Vranken. 29:12 Nov./Dec.

Music and Dance: The Language of the Heart. Alzi Platts and Jeffrey Adrian Oliveira Platts. 29:20 Nov./Dec.


(Humor and Translation by Mark Herman)

Show Me the Money! 29:60 Jan.

Three Bits and Pieces. 29:60: Feb.

Useless Letters. 29:54 March.

Censorship. 29:57 April.

Follow-up and Follow-on. 29:60 May.

About a Yiddish-speaking Indian. 29:56 June.

Copyright Again. 29:63 July.

Curmudgeons. 29:55 Aug.

New-Age Translation. 29:77 Sept.

Babel. 29:59 Oct.

Caveat Emptor. 29:71 Nov./Dec.


(Miss Interpreter Speaks by Laura E. Wolfson)

On Meaning, Meaninglessness, and Emptiness. 29:42 Feb. (see Interpreting)

How to Get Better Reception: From Hors D’oeuvres to Chef D’oeuvres. 29:66 Sept. (see Interpreting)


(Of Literary Note by Jo Anne Engelbert)

Marian Schwartz on Translating Nina Berberova. 29:55 May. (see Literary)

Interview with Madeleine Velguth about her translations of French novelist Raymond Queneau. 29:58 July. (see French; Literary)

Interview with Clifford Landers. 29:70 Sept. (see Literary)

English into English: Seamus Heaney on Translating Beowulf. 29:63 Nov./Dec. (see Literary)


(The Translation Inquirer by John Decker)

29:58 Jan.

29:57 Feb.

29:52 March.

29:54 April.

29:58 May.

29:54 June.

29:61 July.

29:53 Aug.

29:74 Sept.

29:57 Oct.

29:68 Nov./Dec.


MISCELLANEOUS/ASSOCIATION-RELATED NEWS

ATA Division Reports

From the President-elect: Tom West
From the President: Ann G. Macfarlane ATA Board of Directors Elections
From the Executive Director: Walter Bacak, CAE ATA Honors and Awards

 

(ATA Division Reports)

Chinese

Establishing the Chinese Language Division Under the ATA. Frank Mou. 29:65 April.

A Message from the Establishment Committee for the Chinese Language Division. 29:26 Sept.

French

An Update on French Language Division. Joan Bond Sax, 29:27 Jan.

Find out what was discussed at the division’s Annual Meeting.

German

German Language Activities at the St. Louis Conference. Helge L. Gunther. 29:24 Jan.

The German Language Division is off and running toward the new millennium.

Interpreters

Bright Horizons for the Interpreters Division. Diane E. Teichman. 29:19 Feb.

1999, the first year as an established division, was dedicated to taking stock of who we were, how we work, and what our needs were. The result was the establishment of a sound structure from which to build on within the ATA. Our division meeting and reception at the St. Louis conference showed a cohesive, fun-loving, and dynamic membership. Now, for the year 2000, we are both capable and ready to take advantage of the opportunity to play a leading global role in the interpreting profession.

Nordic

Tervetuloa St. Louisiin! / Välkommen Till St. Louis! /

Velkommen to St. Louis! / Welcome to St. Louis! Edith Matteson, 29:25 Jan.

The Nordic Division is on a roll! We have exams, conferences, and courses available and in the works. Read on!

Translation Course Teaser. 29:35 June.

Portuguese

ATA Annual Meeting Minutes of the Portuguese Language Division, November 5, 1999. Donna H. Sandin. 29:17. Jan.

Portuguese Language Division: So Far, So Good! Vera M. B. Abreu. 29:26 Aug.

Over the past year, ATA’s Portuguese Language Division has served as a great outlet for social enjoyment, as well as for some very worthwhile professional activities involving working with others in a team setting.

(Division Reports continued)

Slavic

ATA Slavic Languages Division Conference Report. Christina Sever. 29:19 Jan.

A Slavic family reunion, songs around the fire, elders wax eloquent; the assembled denizens debate, declaim, and define to the delegates’ delight and then depart.

A Column of One’s Own: Five Years of SlavFile Lite. Lydia Razran Stone. 29:35 July. (see Russian)

"SlavFile Lite" is a humor and cultural column that appears regularly in SlavFile, the newsletter of ATA’s Slavic Languages Division. This article contains excerpts from the last five years of the column.

Spanish

Gateway to the New Millennium!

Spanish Language Division Members Gather in St. Louis. Alicia S. V. Marshall. 29:22 Jan.

The ATA Annual Conference afforded SPD members an exceptional opportunity to learn from one another, to exchange ideas, to enjoy good fellowship, and to hone their skills.

The Spanish Language Division: Going on Four

Years of Growth. Alicia S. V. Marshall. 29:26 May.

As the new millennium rolls on, the Spanish Language Division continues to grow in number and to thrive in activities and enthusiasm.

Translation Company

Report on the First Annual Translation Company Division Regional Conference. Steven P. Iverson. 29:25 Aug.

The Translation Company Division’s first annual regional conference, held June 2-4 in Minneapolis, was a great combination of information sharing and learning, and presented many opportunities for networking.

Translation Companies Try to Define "Best Practices." Suzanne Robinson. 29:18 Sept.

All interested ATA members are invited to influence the development of the Translation Company Division's Code of Best Practices during a special session at the Orlando ATA conference.


(From the President: Ann G. Macfarlane)

What's in it for ATA? 29:8 Jan.

On Becoming a "Fitier." 29:8 Feb.

Alert Listeners (ATA members respond to President Clinton's State of the Union Address). 29:8 March.

New Honorary Members. 29:8 April.

Experience is Treacherous, Judgment Difficult. 29:8 May.

Tempora Mutantur. 29:8 June.

Hard Green Worms. 29:8 July.

National with an International Orientation. 29:8 Aug.

A Visit to Kyoto, the Capital Capital. 29:8 Sept.

President Clinton Replies to ATA President. 29:25 Sept.

Subject: Review of the Accreditation Program (An Executive summary of the Accreditation Program Review by Michael S. Hamm). 29:12 Sept.

Gnutella Free Riders. 29:8 Oct.

Life Begins at Forty. 29:8 Nov./Dec.


(From the Executive Director: Walter Bacak, CAE)

ATA Membership by the Numbers. 29:7 Jan.

Conference Presentation. 29:7 Feb.

What's New. 29:7 March.

Three Member Programs Added. 29:7 April.

Highlights from the March Board Meeting. 29:7 May.

Running the Gamut. 29:7 June.

June Board Meeting Highlights. 29:7 July.

Staff Changes. 29:7 Aug.

Members Only, 29:7 Sept.

ATA Offers Retirement Programs. 29:7 Oct.

Highlights from the September Board Meeting. 29:7 Nov./Dec.


(From the President-elect: Tom West)

Making Plans for Orlando. 29:9 April.

Reviewing the Proposals. 29:11 May.

Beyond the Magic Kingdom. 29:9 June.

Preconference Seminars. 29:10 July.

Job Exchange. 29:11 Aug.

My First Conference. 29:11 Sept.


(ATA Board of Directors Elections)

Candidate Statements (Beatriz Bonnet, Rogelio Camacho, Marian S. Greenfield, Jonathan Hine, Gang Li, Alan Melby, Ines Swaney). 29:13 Aug.

(ATA Honors and Awards)

Dr. S. Edmond Berger Awarded Alexander Gode Medal. 29:16 Jan.

Dr. Denise Kaiser Awarded German Translation Prize. 29:16 Jan.

Jartu Gallashaw Toles Awarded Student Translation Award. 29:16 Jan.

Breon Mitchell Awarded Certificate of Commendation. 29:16 Jan.