2002 Chronicle Index (Feature Articles by Subject)

Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies Medical
Client Education Mentoring
Conferences (Worldwide)
Obituaries
Copyright Patents
Financial Translation Professional Development
Incorporation
Project Management
Independent Contractors Public Relations
Interpreting Translation and Terrorism
Interviews Translators/Interpreters and Computers
Language-Specific Articles Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy
Legal MONTHLY COLUMNS
Literary MISCELLANEOUS/ASSOCIATION-RELATED NEWS
Localization Executive Officer Columns
Marketing

Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies

Creating a Company Mentoring Program. Barton Goldsmith. 31:21 January.
(See Mentoring)
If you have experienced the professional and personal growth that comes from a great mentoring relationship, then you will understand the value that comes from creating your own company mentoring program.

A Nostalgic Look at the TCs before the Age of PCs. Sedef Olcer. 31:40 January.
In hindsight, my father’s translation bureau and mine seem as different as day and night.
However, a closer look brings out many similarities.

Pursuing Failure. Barton Goldsmith. 31:16 February.
(See Project Management)
Work to encourage your team to pursue possible failure, and they will respond by pushing the envelope all the way to the top.

Some Thoughts on the Modern Scientific Principle of Systematic Oversimplification. Steve Vlasta Vitek. 31:39 February.
(See Client Education; Project Management)
No matter how many times you proofread a poor translation, the only way to turn it into a good translation is to start from scratch.

Marketing Myself, I Can If I Want to. Michael Klinger. 31:16 June.
(See Independent Contractors; Marketing; Professional Development)

How to succeed in developing your own freelance translation business by following principles based on business theories and matrices for individual achievement.

The Awesome Power of Asking the Right Questions. Barton Goldsmith. 31:18 June.
(See Independent Contractors; Project Management)
Questions are meant to assist, not demean, and will help everyone involved work together to find the best answers.

Setting Up a Translation Agency. Mike Collins. 31:19 July.
(See Independent Contractors; Marketing; Project Management)

Starting a translation agency requires a lot of thought and planning. Here are some tips on how to go about it and some pitfalls to avoid.

Language Services in Survey Research. Kim Watts, Georgina McAvinchey, and Rosanna Quiroz. 31:36 July.
(See Marketing; Professional Development; Project Management)
How do you find out what you need to know? For three in-house translators at a survey research organization, the most important translation resources often take human form.

Personalities at Work. Tim Lewis. 31:20 September.
(See Independent Contractors; Professional Development; Project Management)
Personalities are an important part of the success of businesses. Understanding your own personality traits and those of your employees or coworkers can reduce, if not eliminate, personality conflicts and improve productivity.

How to Speak the Language of Insurers. Kirk Hansen. 31:25 September.
(See Independent Contractors; Marketing)
Establishing strategic partnerships with insurance companies can provide a new market for translators/interpreters and create a growth opportunity. The challenge is to market yourself in a way that will make insurers take note of the skills you have to offer.

How to Sell Translation/Localization Services Without Spending Millions of Dollars. Renato Beninatto. 31:33 October.
(See Localization; Marketing)
Selling takes discipline, not millions of dollars. This article shows some proven practices and tools to sell services professionally.

Your Mission, If You Choose to Accept It. Hélène Wimmerlin. 31:35 October.
(See Project Management)
Translation project managers play a crucial role in the translation industry. Who are they? What makes good project managers and what is their future?

Translating Resumes for Our Small Planet. Sylvie R. Moulin. 31:22 November/December.
(See Independent Contractors; Localization)
Based on the author’s personal experience in France, Chile, and the U.S., this article addresses pertinent issues related to the translation of resumes and the problems resulting from cultural differences.

Do You Run Your Business or Does It Run You? Barton Goldsmith. 31:57 November/December.
(See Independent Contractors; Professional Development; Project Management)
If you’re going to grow a functional organization, one that grows exponentially, you have to learn to hand off some of the responsibility.

Client Education

Thoughts on Evolutionary Aspects of Language and Translation. Ruth Bittorf. 31:17 February.
The ability to speak and think and the emergence of different languages are evolutionary developments that the translator helps to reintegrate to facilitate communication.

Kevin Hendzel Sets PBS Viewers Straight: “Babelfish is 400 Years Away.” Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 31:22 February.
(See Public Relations)
ATA members continue to set the record straight about machine translation.

Some Thoughts on the Modern Scientific Principle of Systematic Oversimplification. Steve Vlasta Vitek. 31:39 February.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Project Management)
No matter how many times you proofread a poor translation, the only way to turn it into a good translation is to start from scratch.

Multilingual Desktop Publishing. Nancy A. Locke. 31:19 March.
(See Localization; Translators/Interpreters and Computers)
The more translators and multilingual desktop publishing specialists know about each other’s work, the better we can work together.

Time for Translation Providers to Come Out of the Shadows. Chris Durban. 31:22 April.
(See Marketing; Public Relations)
The intrepid monolingual buyer of translations faces a challenge that is arguably even more difficult than the one faced by a consumer seeking high-quality healthcare. The reason? Translation buyers are often simply unable to judge what is delivered.

The Professional Image of Translators and Interpreters. Rut Simcovich. 31:25 April.
(See Marketing; Professional Development; Public Relations)
Do translators and interpreters have a professional image? What image do we have of ourselves? There are some indicators that we don’t have much of a professional image and that the little we have is not too good.

Overview of the Los Angeles Area Hospital Project and Training Strategies. Alexander Rainof. 31:36 April.
(See Interpreting; Medical)
The state of medical translation and interpretation in the U.S. has recently resulted in a great deal of concern. A discussion of some of the issues raised by physicians in medical journals (JAMA, JAMWA), by the Office of Civil Rights of the Health and Human Services Department, by the press (LA Times, etc.), and by translators and interpreters throughout the country.

The Joys of Impartiality. Arlene M. Kelly. 31:30 May.
(See Interpreting; Legal)
Impartiality not only forms one of professional interpreting’s doctrines, it can also be a comfort and joy.

Translation in the News: Terrorist Attacks Spotlight Need for Qualified Linguists. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 31:16 July.
(See Public Relations; Translation and Terrorism)

From the ATA Public Relations Committee: Recent articles in the press have criticized U.S. intelligence agencies for failing to develop the capacity to translate less commonly spoken languages, and have called for foreign-language education reform. At this crucial juncture, the ATA should make itself heard.

Learn the Art of Interpreting and Educate Your Clients. Maria McCollum-Rye. 31:38 July.
(See Independent Contractors; Interpreting)
Spending a few minutes before your interpreting session educating your client on how to work with an interpreter will make a world of difference, and will benefit you and our profession.

Alternative Treatment Beliefs and the Medical Interpreter. Vonessa A. Phillips. 31:29 August.
(See Interpreting; Legal; Medical)

Are there legal precedents that govern the care of patients seeking alternative treatment? How should the medical interpreter react in the event that personal biases and beliefs interfere with his or her ability to remain impartial in such situations?

Conferences (Worldwide)

Fifth International Conference on Translation. Eva Jover and Else Mogensen. 31:43 February.
From Arabic technical terminology to a Polish version of Alice in Wonderland: a report on the Fifth International Conference on Translation at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

Latin American Studies Association—Resource for Translators. Phil Berryman. 31:27 March.
(See Professional Development; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

Founded in 1966, LASA brings together “Latin Americanists” across disciplinary lines. The Professional Association of Localization. Nancy A. Locke. 31:23 June.
(See Localization)

The Professional Association of Localization is dedicated to improving the work environment of all localization professionals, and to making sure that these professionals honor their promise to deliver quality to clients.

A Translators’ Tea Party in Boston. Teresa S. Waldes. 31:28 October.
(See ATA Professional Seminars; Professional Development)

A review of the presentations given at ATA’s recent professional development seminar, “The Business of Translating & Interpreting,” held in Boston this past August.

Another Successful ATA Professional Development Seminar. Jacki Noh. 31:15 November/December.
(See ATA Professional Seminars; Professional Development)
A happy attendee shares her thoughts on ATA’s latest professional development seminar, September 14 in San Francisco, featuring top-notch speakers on court interpreting and legal translation.

Copyright

A Jog Through the Juniper: A Translator’s Unhappy Excursion into the Copyright Thicket. Anne Milano Appel and Carol J. Marshall. 31:32 July.
(See Legal; Literary)
A well-intentioned American translator unwittingly finds herself trapped with an irate Italian author in the impenetrable thicket of copyright law, seemingly with no way out. A seasoned attorney and conflict resolution specialist provides tools that can help cut a path through the spiny undergrowth.

Financial Translation

Euro Proficiency for Translators: Focus on Austria and English>German. Ingrid Haussteiner. 31:24 January.
(See Languages [German])
With the street debut of euro banknotes and coins in a number of European countries, the terms euro and cent are bound to crop up in every other text to be translated in the near future.

The New (and Not So New) Words Bred by the Argentine Crisis. Rut Simcovich. 31:29 June.
(See Languages [Spanish])

The existence of a crisis magnifies the communications “gap,” and nowhere is this more prevalent than in cases where references to the events unfolding are absolutely alien to the target culture.

The Argentine Crisis in the English-Language Press. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 31:29 November/December.
(See Languages [Spanish])
The new Spanish terminology spawned by the current crisis in Argentina demonstrates how important it is in translation to focus on meaning rather than words in order to convey the source-language message.

Incorporation

Continued Threats to Independent Contractor Status: A Call for Freelance Translators to Incorporate. Richard S. Paegelow. 31:18 March.
(See Independent Contractors; Legal)
State legislatures and labor departments view the independent contractor relationship with growing suspicion. Legislation at the state level may force freelance translators to seriously consider incorporation if they wish to preserve their independence.

Incorporation versus Sole Proprietorship. Howard Dias. 31:21 April.
(See Independent Contractors; Legal)
Incorporation versus sole proprietor—do the tax savings outweigh the additional costs?

Independent Contractors

What Freelance Translators Can Do to Ensure Payment of Their Work. Marianne Dellinger. 31:21 January.
Freelance translators occasionally experience difficulties collecting payment for their services. Explore some easy, yet effective, steps that ensure sound business practices and limit the risk of not getting paid.

Getting the Word Out. Almudena Grau. 31:17 March.
(See Marketing; Professional Development)
Marketing yourself as a freelance translator and ensuring repeat business.

Continued Threats to Independent Contractor Status: A Call for Freelance Translators to Incorporate. Richard S. Paegelow. 31:18 March.
(See Incorporation; Legal)

State legislatures and labor departments view the independent contractor relationship with growing suspicion. Legislation at the state level may force freelance translators to seriously consider incorporation if they wish to preserve their independence.

Incorporation versus Sole Proprietorship. Howard Dias. 31:21 April.
(See Incorporation; Legal)
Incorporation versus sole proprietor—do the tax savings outweigh the additional costs?

Back to Basics in Professional Preparation. Carol J. Patrie. 31:27 April.
(See Professional Development; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

Working interpreters and student interpreters can benefit from awareness and development of intralingual skills within their working languages, but especially within their first language. This article describes and reviews relevant intralingual skills and cognitive processing skills.

Marketing Myself, I Can If I Want to. Michael Klinger. 31:16 June.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Marketing; Professional Development)

How to succeed in developing your own freelance translation business by following principles based on business theories and matrices for individual achievement.

The Awesome Power of Asking the Right Questions. Barton Goldsmith. 31:18 June.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Project Management)
Questions are meant to assist, not demean, and will help everyone involved work together to find the best answers.

Setting Up a Translation Agency. Mike Collins. 31:19 July.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Marketing; Project Management)

Starting a translation agency requires a lot of thought and planning. Here are some tips on how to go about it and some pitfalls to avoid.

The Biggest Myth of All About Your Independent Translation Business. Nancy M. Snyder. 31:23 July.
(See Marketing)

Once you have established your independent translation business, you need to learn how to handle situations that can stand in the way of success.

Yes, It Is Still Worth It: An Update. Jonathan Hine. 31:27 July.
A summary of an oft-reprinted article on how freelancers can rationally begin to price their work, with updated information about multiple incomes and accounting software.

Learn the Art of Interpreting and Educate Your Clients. Maria McCollum-Rye. 31:38 July.
(See Client Education; Interpreting)
Spending a few minutes before your interpreting session educating your client on how to work with an interpreter will make a world of difference, and will benefit you and our profession.

Personalities at Work. Tim Lewis. 31:20 September.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Professional Development; Project Management)
Personalities are an important part of the success of businesses. Understanding your own personality traits and those of your employees or coworkers can reduce, if not eliminate, personality conflicts and improve productivity.

How to Speak the Language of Insurers. Kirk Hansen. 31:25 September.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Marketing)
Establishing strategic partnerships with insurance companies can provide a new market for translators/interpreters and create a growth opportunity. The challenge is to market yourself in a way that will make insurers take note of the skills you have to offer.

Professionalism 101. Betty Howell. 31:31 October.
(See Professional Development)
Years of translating develop skills and attitudes that distinguish the professional from the talented beginner. This article discusses some of the more obvious ones in an effort to help newcomers learn where to focus their energies.

Effective Freelancer Resumes. Marian S. Greenfield and Teresa S. Waldes. 31:19 November/December.
(See Marketing)
A thoughtful, well-written, and well-laid out resume is key to attracting new clients and advancing your career.

Translating Resumes for Our Small Planet. Sylvie R. Moulin. 31:22 November/December.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Localization)
Based on the author’s personal experience in France, Chile, and the U.S., this article addresses pertinent issues related to the translation of resumes and the problems resulting from cultural differences.

Do You Run Your Business or Does It Run You? Barton Goldsmith. 31:57 November/December.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Professional Development; Project Management)
If you’re going to grow a functional organization, one that grows exponentially, you have to learn to hand off some of the responsibility.

Interpreting

Consecutive Interpreter Training Using Cooperative Learning Approaches. Sheng-Jie Chen. 31:22 March.
(See Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)
How can a consecutive interpreting course be implemented using cooperative learning approaches, and how can the results of the study be applied to facilitate similar training?

The Right to an Interpreter—Who Decides? An Australian Perspective. Penny Patterson. 31:17 April.
(See Legal)

The capacity of judges (who are extensively trained in legal matters, but not usually in linguistic ones) to make informed decisions about language proficiency is highly questionable, and exposes a serious weakness in the Australian legal system.

Overview of the Los Angeles Area Hospital Project and Training Strategies. Alexander Rainof. 31:36 April.
(See Client Education; Medical)

The state of medical translation and interpretation in the U.S. has recently resulted in a great deal of concern. A discussion of some of the issues raised by physicians in medical journals (JAMA, JAMWA), by the Office of Civil Rights of the Health and Human Services Department, by the press (LA Times, etc.), and by translators and interpreters throughout the country.

An Interpreter’s Nightmare. Tony Beckwith. 31:15 May.
Where are we going today?

Community Translators and Interpreters: Understanding the Concept and Demanding Respect. Eduardo Gonzalez. 31:21 May.
(See Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

A discussion of the efforts at the University of Nebraska at Kearney to develop an undergraduate program to train community translators/interpreters.

The Joys of Impartiality. Arlene M. Kelly. 31:30 May.
(See Client Education; Legal)
Impartiality not only forms one of professional interpreting’s doctrines, it can also be a comfort and joy.

The SSTI/NAJIT Translation and Interpretation National Certification Examination. Dagoberto Orrantia. 31:19 June.
(See Legal; Professional Development)

Court interpreting in the U.S. has not yet attained the level of licensure, but a number of governmental and nongovernmental entities are certifying court interpreters. One such exam, designed by The National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Translators, leads to a Certificate of Competency in Judiciary Translation and Interpretation.

Learn the Art of Interpreting and Educate Your Clients. Maria McCollum-Rye. 31:38 July.
(See Client Education; Independent Contractors)
Spending a few minutes before your interpreting session educating your client on how to work with an interpreter will make a world of difference, and will benefit you and our profession.

All This, and Money, Too! Tony Beckwith. 31:46 July.
My friends at home always picture me sightseeing, taking day-trips to the mountains, and acting like a tourist. However, I have spent several days in some cities and never actually left the hotel.

Alternative Treatment Beliefs and the Medical Interpreter. Vonessa A. Phillips. 31:29 August.
(See Client Education; Legal; Medical)

Are there legal precedents that govern the care of patients seeking alternative treatment? How should the medical interpreter react in the event that personal biases and beliefs interfere with his or her ability to remain impartial in such situations?

A Quality Assurance Model for Remote Language Mediation. David Sawyer, Frances Butler, Jean Turner, and Irene Nikolayeva Stone. 31:36 August.
(See Translator/Interpreting Training and Pedagogy)

A new quality assurance model for telephone interpreters addressing the challenge of identifying, training, and testing competent bilinguals in this burgeoning sector of the telecommunications industry.

NAJIT Spanish Certification Examination Complete. Ann G. Macfarlane. 31:8 September.
(See Legal)

What Can Interpreters Learn from Aristotle and Stanislavsky? Estela Herrera. 31:37 September.
(See Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)
How Aristotle’s and Stanislavky’s methods can serve as valuable resources when training interpreters in the nontechnical skills which are not traditionally taught in interpretation schools.

The Concept of Equivalence in Court Interpreting. Marina Braun. 31:33 September.
(See Legal; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

To put restraints on translators/interpreters by demanding a “verbatim” translation is to disregard the fundamental tenets of modern language and communication theories. Instead, the goal of any translation/interpretation should be semiotic equivalence (i.e., achieving correspondence on the level of cultural units between the source language and target language).

Adventures in Online Learning: Introduction to Medical Interpreting. Holly Mikkelson. 31:31 September.
(See Medical; Translators/Interpreters and Computers; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

An existing course, Introduction to Medical Interpreting, was converted to an online environment. Students participated in nine weeks of online work, consisting of readings from websites, vocabulary-building exercises, and a threaded e-mail discussion. Then they journeyed to Monterey for a one-week intensive workshop in medical interpreting.

A Translator Interpreting: Deal-Making 101. Kirk Anderson. 31:28 September.
This is the true story of a translator who got talked into being an interpreter.

Strategizing Your Performance at the Witness Stand. Janis Palma. 31:25 November/December.
(See Legal)
When consecutive judiciary interpreters are aware of the highly structured forms required in order to communicate ideas in legal discourse, they can improve both retention and efficacy in their performance.

Reducing the Impact of Preconceptions on Interpreter Training Through Corpus-Based Studies. Peter P. Lindquist. 31:35 November/December.
(See Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)
A discussion of how corpus-based analysis may be adapted to the study of simultaneous interpreting to improve training methods by exposing areas of difficulty, patterns of linguistic and extralinguistic behavior, and coping strategies that can affect the performance quality of interpreting students.

Interviews

Slavic Translation for the Determined: Reflections of a Polyglot Translator. Ursula Klingenberg. 31:31 June.
(See Languages [Slavic])

An interview with Joel Stern, a staff member of the Office of Language Services at the State Department, who translates from several Slavic languages into English for that institution.

An Interview with Reinhold Werner. Rudy Heller (English translation by Andre Moskowitz). 31:47 July.
(See Languages [German, Spanish])
An interview with Reinhold Werner, professor of applied linguistics at the University of Augsburg, Germany, concerning various linguistic issues, including language variation, language influence, language policy, and translation.

An Interview with Professor Bernard Lewis. Lily Liu. 31:49 August.
(See Literary)

The Professor of Near Eastern Studies, Emeritus, at Princeton University discusses his long career and his impressions of Middle Eastern literature and history.

An Interview with Tameme editor C.M. Mayo. Lily Liu. 31:51 November/December.
(See Literary)
A talk with the founding editor of Tameme, the annual bilingual journal of new writing from North America.

 

Language-Specific Articles

(Arabic)

  • Cultural Awareness and the Arabic Interpreter. Aziz El-Nasser Ismail. 31:21 August.
    (See Translation and Terrorism)

    The time has come to meet the challenges of being in the public eye and maintaining the integrity of our work under sometimes difficult conditions.

(Chinese)

  • Chinese-English Literary Translation in Mainland China from 1949 to 1978: A Case Study. Qian Duoxiu. 31:41 January
    (See Literary)
    An account of the experiences of two leading Chinese-English literary translators in Mainland China from 1949 to 1978, reflecting upon the political and cultural forces that had a decisive influence on their careers.
  • Teaching Information Technology in Translator-Training Programs in Hong Kong. Defeng Li. 31:29 March.
    (See Translators/Interpreters and Computers; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)
    How should information technology be taught in an undergraduate translator-training program in Hong Kong?

  • Simplified versus Traditional Chinese: What Every Translation Agency Should Know. Claire Liu and Jessie Lu. 31:24 June.
    (See Localization)

    Although the Simplified and Traditional Chinese characters used in Mainland China and Taiwan are based on the same writing system, variations exist which can be traced to cultural differences and the prolonged political separation of the two regions.
  • Increasing Web Visibility for the Chinese Market. Mike Adams and Sheh Lio. 31:42 September.
    (See Localization; Marketing; Translators/Interpreters and Computers)
    If you want your company, products, or services to be seen by Internet-savvy Chinese consumers, it’s essential that your site appear on Chinese-language search engines. Make it well worth their click, and you’ll be richly rewarded on a global scale!

(French)

  • Idioms Under the Microscope. Romina L. Marazzato. 31:30 January
    (See Languages [Spanish])
    A series of French and Spanish translation samples provide the backdrop for an examination of the semantic components of idioms based on concepts borrowed from linguistics and the philosophy of language.
  • Metaphor in Old French and Its Translation: Chrétien de Troyes’s Érec et Énide. Michael Walker. 31:43 May.
    (See Literary)
    An examination of the conjunctive relationship between metaphoric structure, narrative effect, and aspects of translation in the works of Chrétien de Troyes.
  • Internet Resources for the Translation of Patents into English. Steve Vlasta Vitek. 31:41 July.
    (See Languages [German, Japanese]; Patents; Translators/Interpreters and Computers)
    An introduction to some of the most important sites for the translation of patents from Japanese, German, French, and other languages.

  • French®English Legal Dictionaries: An American Lawyer’s Analysis. Thomas L. West III. 31:22 October.
    (See Legal)

    The time is ripe for a person to produce a bilingual dictionary that takes into account the way legal terms are used in each area of law and in each legal system.
  • The B.A. in Translation and Professional Writing: Looking at the Flowing Water, Not the Canoe. Christiane Melançon and Marco A. Fiola. 31:31 November/December.
    (See Localization; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)
    With two unique programs in translation and professional writing and localization, the Université du Québec en Outaouais (Gatineau, Canada) is embracing change while helping language professionals prepare for the future.

(German)

  • Euro Proficiency for Translators: Focus on Austria and English>German. Ingrid Haussteiner. 31:24 January.
    (See Financial Translation)
    With the street debut of euro banknotes and coins in a number of European countries, the terms euro and cent are bound to crop up in every other text to be translated in the near future.
  • An Introduction to German Patent Translation. Nicholas Hartmann. 31:32 April.
    (See Patents)
    Basic principles and procedures for translating German patents into English, including information about suggested working methods and the attitudes and qualifications that patent translators must bring to their work.
  • Internet Resources for the Translation of Patents into English. Steve Vlasta Vitek. 31:41 July.
    (See Languages [French, Japanese]; Patents; Translators/Interpreters and Computers)
    An introduction to some of the most important sites for the translation of patents from Japanese, German, French, and other languages.
  • An Interview with Reinhold Werner. Rudy Heller (English translation by Andre Moskowitz). 31:47 July.
    (See Interviews; Languages [Spanish])
    An interview with Reinhold Werner, professor of applied linguistics at the University of Augsburg, Germany, concerning various linguistic issues, including language variation, language influence, language policy, and translation.
  • Contracts in German(y). Christiane Bohnert. 31:45 October.
    (See Legal)
    An overview of contracts according to German law.

(Japanese)

  • Internet Resources for the Translation of Patents into English. Steve Vlasta Vitek. 31:41 July.
    (See Languages [French, German]; Patents; Translators/Interpreters and Computers)
    An introduction to some of the most important sites for the translation of patents from Japanese, German, French, and other languages.

  • Resource Materials for the Japanese®English Translation of Lab Animal Studies. Lee Seaman. 31:40 August.
    (See Medical)
    A compilation of some of the new trends and terminology from recent medical studies.
  • A Brief Introduction on the Use of the Internet for Japanese Medical Translation. Yuka Tamura. 31:41 November/December.
    (See Translators/Interpreters and Computers)
    A short introduction for beginners on how to use the Internet as a resource for those English«Japanese medical translation projects.

(Portuguese)

  • How I Learned Portuguese. Paulo Rónai (Translated by Tom Moore). 31:52 October.
    (See Literary)
    An essay by the late translator, linguist, and lexicographer Paulo Rónai (1907-1992) describing how he came to learn Portuguese and publish translations of Brazilian poetry in Budapest before the outbreak of the Second World War, and how he came to emigrate to Brazil.

(Slavic [general])

  • Slavic Translation for the Determined: Reflections of a Polyglot Translator. Ursula Klingenberg. 31:31 June.
    (See Interviews)

    An interview with Joel Stern, a staff member of the Office of Language Services at the State Department, who translates from several Slavic languages into English for that institution.

(Spanish)

  • Idioms Under the Microscope. Romina L. Marazzato. 31:30 January.
    (See Languages [French])
    A series of French and Spanish translation samples provide the backdrop for an examination of the semantic components of idioms based on concepts borrowed from linguistics and the philosophy of language.
  • Two Hands Clapping: Nuances of Sound and Style in Prose Translation. Cindy Schuster. 31:36 February.
    (See Literary)
    In an analysis of the process of translating a short story by María Luisa Puga, this article discusses how the language used to convey certain sounds functions, not only to evoke their aural qualities, but also to clue the reader in on how a character’s perception of sound metaphorically reveals her psychological state.

  • The New (and Not So New) Words Bred by the Argentine Crisis. Rut Simcovich. 31:29 June.
    (See Financial Translation)

    The existence of a crisis magnifies the communications “gap,” and nowhere is this more prevalent than in cases where references to the events unfolding are absolutely alien to the target culture.
  • An Interview with Reinhold Werner. Rudy Heller (English translation by Andre Moskowitz). 31:47 July.
    (See Languages [German])
    An interview with Reinhold Werner, professor of applied linguistics at the University of Augsburg, Germany, concerning various linguistic issues, including language variation, language influence, language policy, and translation.
  • Developing a Glossary of Special Lexical Units Used in Cuba’s Variant of Spanish. Eduardo González. 31:44 August.
    (See Literary)
    Using the prose of Zoé Valdés to develop a comprehensive bilingual glossary of special lexical units, to include colloquial and vulgar Cuban Spanish.

  • Lack of Due Diligence in Mexican International Reinsurance Translations. Ellen P. Walroth Sadurni. 31:27 September.
    (See Legal)

    Lack of due diligence in the legal review process of international reinsurance contracts issued in Mexico is a serious danger to all involved parties.
  • English®Spanish Legal Dictionaries on Probation. Sandro Tomasi. 31:37 October.
    (See Legal)
    A study on how best to translate the term probation into Spanish. As you will see, most bilingual legal dictionaries to date have completely missed the mark.
  • The Rodríguez Tango. Tony Beckwith. 31:56 October.
    Portrait in tempo of a summer night in Madrid.
  • The Argentine Crisis in the English-Language Press. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 31:29 November/December.
    (See Financial Translation)
    The new Spanish terminology spawned by the current crisis in Argentina demonstrates how important it is in translation to focus on meaning rather than words in order to convey the source-language message.
  • ¡Che inglés! Tony Beckwith. 31:56 November/December.
    How embarrassing to be a stranger in my own land! ¡Qué vergüenza!


Legal

Translating Official Documents for African Immigrants. Adrián Fuentes Luque. 31:34 February.
The influx of immigrants from developing countries poses new challenges not only for politicians and social agents, but also for translators, who are confronted with official documents of varied and often unfamiliar ethnic, legal, and cultural backgrounds.

Continued Threats to Independent Contractor Status: A Call for Freelance Translators to Incorporate. Richard S. Paegelow. 31:18 March.
(See Incorporation; Independent Contractors)
State legislatures and labor departments view the independent contractor relationship with growing suspicion. Legislation at the state level may force freelance translators to seriously consider incorporation if they wish to preserve their independence.

The Right to an Interpreter—Who Decides? An Australian Perspective. Penny Patterson. 31:17 April.
(See Interpreting)
The capacity of judges (who are extensively trained in legal matters, but not usually in linguistic ones) to make informed decisions about language proficiency is highly questionable, and exposes a serious weakness in the Australian legal system.

Incorporation versus Sole Proprietorship. Howard Dias. 31:21 April.
(See Incorporation; Independent Contractors)
Incorporation versus sole proprietor—do the tax savings outweigh the additional costs?

The Joys of Impartiality. Arlene M. Kelly. 31:30 May.
(See Client Education; Interpreting)
Impartiality not only forms one of professional interpreting’s doctrines, it can also be a comfort and joy.

The SSTI/NAJIT Translation and Interpretation National Certification Examination. Dagoberto Orrantia. 31:19 June.
(See Interpreting; Professional Development)

Court interpreting in the U.S. has not yet attained the level of licensure, but a number of governmental and nongovernmental entities are certifying court interpreters. One such exam, designed by The National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Translators, leads to a Certificate of Competency in Judiciary Translation and Interpretation.

A Jog Through the Juniper: A Translator’s Unhappy Excursion into the Copyright Thicket. Anne Milano Appel and Carol J. Marshall. 31:32 July.
(See Literary)
A well-intentioned American translator unwittingly finds herself trapped with an irate Italian author in the impenetrable thicket of copyright law, seemingly with no way out. A seasoned attorney and conflict resolution specialist provides tools that can help cut a path through the spiny undergrowth.

Legal Issues in the Translation of Healthcare Documents. Maria Cornelio. 31:24 August.
(See Medical)

A discussion of the federal government’s stringent regulations covering patients’ rights, informed consent, and the protection of human subjects in medical research, and how they relate to the translation of documents written for the healthcare consumer.

Alternative Treatment Beliefs and the Medical Interpreter. Vonessa A. Phillips. 31:29 August.
(See Client Education; Interpreting; Medical)

Are there legal precedents that govern the care of patients seeking alternative treatment? How should the medical interpreter react in the event that personal biases and beliefs interfere with his or her ability to remain impartial in such situations?

NAJIT Spanish Certification Examination Complete. Ann G. Macfarlane. 31:8 September.
(See Interpreting)

The Concept of Equivalence in Court Interpreting. Marina Braun. 31:33 September.
(See Interpreting; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

To put restraints on translators/interpreters by demanding a “verbatim” translation is to disregard the fundamental tenets of modern language and communication theories. Instead, the goal of any translation/interpretation should be semiotic equivalence (i.e., achieving correspondence on the level of cultural units between the source language and target language).

Lack of Due Diligence in Mexican International Reinsurance Translations. Ellen P. Walroth Sadurni. 31:27 September.
(See Languages [Spanish])

Lack of due diligence in the legal review process of international reinsurance contracts issued in Mexico is a serious danger to all involved parties.

French®English Legal Dictionaries: An American Lawyer’s Analysis. Thomas L. West III. 31:22 October.
(See Languages [French])

The time is ripe for a person to produce a bilingual dictionary that takes into account the way legal terms are used in each area of law and in each legal system.

English®Spanish Legal Dictionaries on Probation. Sandro Tomasi. 31:37 October.
(See Languages [Spanish])
A study on how best to translate the term probation into Spanish. As you will see, most bilingual legal dictionaries to date have completely missed the mark.

Contracts in German(y). Christiane Bohnert. 31:45 October.
(See Languages [German])
An overview of contracts according to German law.

Strategizing Your Performance at the Witness Stand. Janis Palma. 31:25 November/December.
(See Interpreting)
When consecutive judiciary interpreters are aware of the highly structured forms required in order to communicate ideas in legal discourse, they can improve both retention and efficacy in their performance.

Literary

Chinese-English Literary Translation in Mainland China from 1949 to 1978: A Case Study. Qian Duoxiu. 31:41 January
(See Languages [Chinese])
An account of the experiences of two leading Chinese-English literary translators in Mainland China from 1949 to 1978, reflecting upon the political and cultural forces that had a decisive influence on their careers.

Problems of Bible Translation. Ilias Chatzitheodorou. 31:45 January.
A study of some of the basic problems of Bible translation that have been encountered in the past and which will certainly be encountered in the future.

Two Hands Clapping: Nuances of Sound and Style in Prose Translation. Cindy Schuster. 31:36 February.
(See Languages [Spanish]; Literary)
In an analysis of the process of translating a short story by María Luisa Puga, this article discusses how the language used to convey certain sounds functions, not only to evoke their aural qualities, but also to clue the reader in on how a character’s perception of sound metaphorically reveals her psychological state.

Family Secrets. Camilla Bozzoli. 31:34 March.
They happen in even the best of families.

Translation: The Idea of Accuracy and the Challenge of Literacy. Roger Greenwald. 31:38 March.
Most, if not all, texts embody important cultural and stylistic features, and translators must do far more than achieve “accuracy” with respect to paraphrasable content if they are to do justice to the originals and convey them from one culture to another.

Problems in Theatrical Translation: The Bilingual Text. Phyllis Zatlin. 31:24 May.
Bilingual or multilingual plays may range from simple ones, in which only one language is used (although a second one is implied), to far more complex ones, in which a second language is used extensively (whether or not the audience is expected to understand it).

Character Delineation in Opera Translations: Examples from Wagner’s Ring. Ronnie Apter and Mark Herman. 31:36 May.
Individuation of character is as important to an opera libretto as it is to a spoken play, and therefore also to translations of either. Lacking such character individuation, a translation is unlikely to succeed on the stage.

Metaphor in Old French and Its Translation: Chrétien de Troyes’s Érec et Énide. Michael Walker. 31:43 May.
(See Languages [French])
An examination of the conjunctive relationship between metaphoric structure, narrative effect, and aspects of translation in the works of Chrétien de Troyes.

The Writing Life. Howard Goldblatt. 31:41 June.
Confessions of a literary translator.

A Jog Through the Juniper: A Translator’s Unhappy Excursion into the Copyright Thicket. Anne Milano Appel and Carol J. Marshall. 31:32 July.
(See Legal)
A well-intentioned American translator unwittingly finds herself trapped with an irate Italian author in the impenetrable thicket of copyright law, seemingly with no way out. A seasoned attorney and conflict resolution specialist provides tools that can help cut a path through the spiny undergrowth.

Developing a Glossary of Special Lexical Units Used in Cuba’s Variant of Spanish. Eduardo González. 31:45 August.
(See Languages [Spanish])
Using the prose of Zoé Valdés to develop a comprehensive bilingual glossary of special lexical units, to include colloquial and vulgar Cuban Spanish.

An Interview with Professor Bernard Lewis. Lily Liu. 31:49 August.
(See Interviews)

The Professor of Near Eastern Studies, Emeritus, at Princeton University discusses his long career and his impressions of Middle Eastern literature and history.

How I Learned Portuguese. Paulo Rónai (Translated by Tom Moore). 31:52 October.
(See Languages [Portuguese])
An essay by the late translator, linguist, and lexicographer Paulo Rónai (1907-1992) describing how he came to learn Portuguese and publish translations of Brazilian poetry in Budapest before the outbreak of the Second World War, and how he came to emigrate to Brazil.

Translators’/Interpreters’ Historic Blunders Along the Frontiers of Languages and Cultures. Richard Finks Whitaker. 31:44 November/December.
History is replete with curious reminders that, without the assistance of skilled translators/interpreters, crossing cultures can lead to all manner of misconceptions. Yet even where translation and interpretation are handled by professionals, faux pas can occur—with consequences that range from the amusing to the sobering.

An Interview with Tameme editor C.M. Mayo. Lily Liu. 31:51 November/December.
(See Interviews)
A talk with the founding editor of Tameme, the annual bilingual journal of new writing from North America.

 

Localization

Translation-Mediated Communication on the Internet. Minako O’Hagan and David Ashworth. 31:36 January.
(See Translators/Interpreters and Computers)
Despite the instantaneous global reach of the Internet, language continues to be one of the principal obstacles to full globalization.

Where Do We Go from Here? Tim Altanero. 31:26 February.
A brief overview of the evolution of the localization industry.

Multilingual Desktop Publishing. Nancy A. Locke. 31:19 March.
(See Client Education; Translators/Interpreters and Computers)
The more translators and multilingual desktop publishing specialists know about each other’s work, the better we can work together.

The Professional Association of Localization. Nancy A. Locke. 31:23 June.
(See Conferences [Worldwide])

The Professional Association of Localization is dedicated to improving the work environment of all localization professionals, and to making sure that these professionals honor their promise to deliver quality to clients.

Simplified versus Traditional Chinese: What Every Translation Agency Should Know. Claire Liu and Jessie Lu. 31:24 June.
(See Languages [Chinese])

Although the Simplified and Traditional Chinese characters used in Mainland China and Taiwan are based on the same writing system, variations exist which can be traced to cultural differences and the prolonged political separation of the two regions.

Increasing Web Visibility for the Chinese Market. Mike Adams and Sheh Lio. 31:42 September.
(See Languages [Chinese]; Marketing; Translators/Interpreters and Computers)
If you want your company, products, or services to be seen by Internet-savvy Chinese consumers, it’s essential that your site appear on Chinese-language search engines. Make it well worth their click, and you’ll be richly rewarded on a global scale!

How to Sell Translation/Localization Services Without Spending Millions of Dollars. Renato Beninatto. 31:33 October.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Marketing)
Selling takes discipline, not millions of dollars. This article shows some proven practices and tools to sell services professionally.

Translating Resumes for Our Small Planet. Sylvie R. Moulin. 31:22 November/December.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Independent Contractors)
Based on the author’s personal experience in France, Chile, and the U.S., this article addresses pertinent issues related to the translation of resumes and the problems resulting from cultural differences.

The B.A. in Translation and Professional Writing: Looking at the Flowing Water, Not the Canoe. Christiane Melançon and Marco A. Fiola. 31:31 November/December.
(See Languages [French]; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)
With two unique programs in translation and professional writing and localization, the Université du Québec en Outaouais (Gatineau, Canada) is embracing change while helping language professionals prepare for the future.

Marketing

Getting the Word Out. Almudena Grau. 31:17 March.
(See Independent Contractors; Professional Development)
Marketing yourself as a freelance translator and ensuring repeat business.

Time for Translation Providers to Come Out of the Shadows. Chris Durban. 31:22 April.
(See Client Education; Public Relations)
The intrepid monolingual buyer of translations faces a challenge that is arguably even more difficult than the one faced by a consumer seeking high-quality healthcare. The reason? Translation buyers are often simply unable to judge what is delivered.

The Professional Image of Translators and Interpreters. Rut Simcovich. 31:25 April.
(See Client Education; Professional Development; Public Relations)
Do translators and interpreters have a professional image? What image do we have of ourselves? There are some indicators that we don’t have much of a professional image and that the little we have is not too good.

Marketing Myself, I Can If I Want to. Michael Klinger. 31:16 June.
(See Independent Contractors; Professional Development)

How to succeed in developing your own freelance translation business by following principles based on business theories and matrices for individual achievement.

Setting Up a Translation Agency. Mike Collins. 31:19 July.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Independent Contractors; Project Management)

Starting a translation agency requires a lot of thought and planning. Here are some tips on how to go about it and some pitfalls to avoid.

The Biggest Myth of All About Your Independent Translation Business. Nancy M. Snyder. 31:23 July.
(See Independent Contractors)

Once you have established your independent translation business, you need to learn how to handle situations that can stand in the way of success.

Language Services in Survey Research. Kim Watts, Georgina McAvinchey, and Rosanna Quiroz. 31:36 July.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Professional Development; Project Management)
How do you find out what you need to know? For three in-house translators at a survey research organization, the most important translation resources often take human form.

How to Speak the Language of Insurers. Kirk Hansen. 31:25 September.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Independent Contractors)
Establishing strategic partnerships with insurance companies can provide a new market for translators/interpreters and create a growth opportunity. The challenge is to market yourself in a way that will make insurers take note of the skills you have to offer.

Increasing Web Visibility for the Chinese Market. Mike Adams and Sheh Lio. 31:42 September.
(See Languages [Chinese]; Localization; Translators/Interpreters and Computers)
If you want your company, products, or services to be seen by Internet-savvy Chinese consumers, it’s essential that your site appear on Chinese-language search engines. Make it well worth their click, and you’ll be richly rewarded on a global scale!

How to Sell Translation/Localization Services Without Spending Millions of Dollars. Renato Beninatto. 31:33 October.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Localization)
Selling takes discipline, not millions of dollars. This article shows some proven practices and tools to sell services professionally.

Effective Freelancer Resumes. Marian S. Greenfield and Teresa S. Waldes. 31:19 November/December.
(See Independent Contractors)
A thoughtful, well-written, and well-laid out resume is key to attracting new clients and advancing your career.

 

Medical

Overview of the Los Angeles Area Hospital Project and Training Strategies. Alexander Rainof. 31:36 April.
(See Client Education; Interpreting)

The state of medical translation and interpretation in the U.S. has recently resulted in a great deal of concern. A discussion of some of the issues raised by physicians in medical journals (JAMA, JAMWA), by the Office of Civil Rights of the Health and Human Services Department, by the press (LA Times, etc.), and by translators and interpreters throughout the country.

Legal Issues in the Translation of Healthcare Documents. Maria Cornelio. 31:24 August.
(See Legal)

A discussion of the federal government’s stringent regulations covering patients’ rights, informed consent, and the protection of human subjects in medical research, and how they relate to the translation of documents written for the healthcare consumer.

Alternative Treatment Beliefs and the Medical Interpreter. Vonessa A. Phillips. 31:29 August.
(See Client Education; Interpreting; Legal)

Are there legal precedents that govern the care of patients seeking alternative treatment? How should the medical interpreter react in the event that personal biases and beliefs interfere with his or her ability to remain impartial in such situations?

Multilingual Medicine: Translation at Mayo Clinic. Karen Engler. 31:33 August.
Major international medical centers need to translate a great deal of written information for patients, physicians, and the general public. This article describes the translation process at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Resource Materials for the Japanese®English Translation of Lab Animal Studies. Lee Seaman. 31:40 August.
(See Languages [Japanese])
A compilation of some of the new trends and terminology from recent medical studies.

Adventures in Online Learning: Introduction to Medical Interpreting. Holly Mikkelson. 31:31 September.
(See Interpreting; Translators/Interpreters and Computers; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

An existing course, Introduction to Medical Interpreting, was converted to an online environment. Students participated in nine weeks of online work, consisting of readings from websites, vocabulary-building exercises, and a threaded e-mail discussion. Then they journeyed to Monterey for a one-week intensive workshop in medical interpreting.

Encouragement for Nonscientific Translators to Begin Translating Biomedical Documents. Mizuho Iwamoto. 31:49 October.
The great variety of documents in the biomedical field offers many topics of interest to translators with nonscientific backgrounds. Translating material from such fields can provide fascinating work, and can also help to solve the shortage of biomedical translators.

Mentoring

Creating a Company Mentoring Program. Barton Goldsmith. 31:21 January.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies)
If you have experienced the professional and personal growth that comes from a great mentoring relationship, then you will understand the value that comes from creating your own company mentoring program.

What’s Happening with the ATA Pilot Mentoring Program? Courtney Searls-Ridge. 31:13 March.
The ATA Mentoring Program has taken an unexpected direction and is now proceeding on two fronts—the Formal Mentoring Program and the Enhanced Informal Mentoring Program.

The ATA Pilot Mentoring Program: A Mentee’s Perspective. Marissa Wright. 31:15 March.
ATA’s Mentoring Program is anything but your average mentoring experience.

What’s in it for me? Courtney Searls-Ridge and Mary David. 31:27 October.
(See Professional Development)

Why would anyone volunteer to be an ATA mentor? There are as many reasons as there are mentors.

Obituaries

Charter Member Mario Minafra. 31:26 April.

Harvie Jordan. 31:9 November/December.

Patents

An Introduction to German Patent Translation. Nicholas Hartmann. 31:32 April.
(See Languages [German])
Basic principles and procedures for translating German patents into English, including information about suggested working methods and the attitudes and qualifications that patent translators must bring to their work.

Internet Resources for the Translation of Patents into English. Steve Vlasta Vitek. 31:41 July.
(See Languages [French, German, Japanese]; Translators/Interpreters and Computers)
An introduction to some of the most important sites for the translation of patents from Japanese, German, French, and other languages.

Professional Development

Getting the Word Out. Almudena Grau. 31:17 March.
(See Independent Contractors; Marketing)
Marketing yourself as a freelance translator and ensuring repeat business.

Latin American Studies Association—Resource for Translators. Phil Berryman. 31:27 March.
(See Conferences [Worldwide]; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)
Founded in 1966, LASA brings together “Latin Americanists” across disciplinary lines.

The Professional Image of Translators and Interpreters. Rut Simcovich. 31:25 April.
(See Client Education; Marketing; Public Relations)
Do translators and interpreters have a professional image? What image do we have of ourselves? There are some indicators that we don’t have much of a professional image and that the little we have is not too good.

Back to Basics in Professional Preparation. Carol J. Patrie. 31:27 April.
(See Independent Contractors; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)
Working interpreters and student interpreters can benefit from awareness and development of intralingual skills within their working languages, but especially within their first language. This article describes and reviews relevant intralingual skills and cognitive processing skills.

Marketing Myself, I Can If I Want to. Michael Klinger. 31:16 June.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Independent Contractors; Marketing)

How to succeed in developing your own freelance translation business by following principles based on business theories and matrices for individual achievement.

The SSTI/NAJIT Translation and Interpretation National Certification Examination. Dagoberto Orrantia. 31:19 June.
(See Interpreting; Legal)

Court interpreting in the U.S. has not yet attained the level of licensure, but a number of governmental and nongovernmental entities are certifying court interpreters. One such exam, designed by The National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Translators, leads to a Certificate of Competency in Judiciary Translation and Interpretation.

Language Services in Survey Research. Kim Watts, Georgina McAvinchey, and Rosanna Quiroz. 31:36 July.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Marketing; Project Management)
How do you find out what you need to know? For three in-house translators at a survey research organization, the most important translation resources often take human form.

Personalities at Work. Tim Lewis. 31:20 September.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Independent Contractors; Project Management)
Personalities are an important part of the success of businesses. Understanding your own personality traits and those of your employees or coworkers can reduce, if not eliminate, personality conflicts and improve productivity.

What’s in it for me? Courtney Searls-Ridge and Mary David. 31:27 October.
(See Mentoring)
Why would anyone volunteer to be an ATA mentor? There are as many reasons as there are mentors.

A Translators’ Tea Party in Boston. Teresa S. Waldes. 31:28 October.
(See ATA Professional Seminars; Conferences [Worldwide])

A review of the presentations given at ATA’s recent professional development seminar, “The Business of Translating & Interpreting,” held in Boston this past August.

Professionalism 101. Betty Howell. 31:31 October.
(See Independent Contractors)
Years of translating develop skills and attitudes that distinguish the professional from the talented beginner. This article discusses some of the more obvious ones in an effort to help newcomers learn where to focus their energies.

Another Successful ATA Professional Development Seminar. Jacki Noh. 31:15 November/December.
(See ATA Professional Seminars; Conferences [Worldwide])
A happy attendee shares her thoughts on ATA’s latest professional development seminar, September 14 in San Francisco, featuring top-notch speakers on court interpreting and legal translation.

Do You Run Your Business or Does It Run You? Barton Goldsmith. 31:57 November/December.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Independent Contractors; Project Management)
If you’re going to grow a functional organization, one that grows exponentially, you have to learn to hand off some of the responsibility.

Project Management

Pursuing Failure. Barton Goldsmith. 31:16 February.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies)
Work to encourage your team to pursue possible failure, and they will respond by pushing the envelope all the way to the top.

Some Thoughts on the Modern Scientific Principle of Systematic Oversimplification. Steve Vlasta Vitek. 31:39 February.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Client Education)
No matter how many times you proofread a poor translation, the only way to turn it into a good translation is to start from scratch.

Collaborative Translation Projects: Pedagogical Approaches in Teaching Translation. Enrica J. Ardemagni. 31:16 May.
(See Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

Translator training offers various ways of helping students understand the whole process of translation. This article shows how collaborative translation projects allow students to improve their knowledge and problem-solving skills through teamwork.

The Awesome Power of Asking the Right Questions. Barton Goldsmith. 31:18 June.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Independent Contractors)

Questions are meant to assist, not demean, and will help everyone involved work together to find the best answers.
Setting Up a Translation Agency. Mike Collins. 31:19 July.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Independent Contractors; Marketing)
Starting a translation agency requires a lot of thought and planning. Here are some tips on how to go about it and some pitfalls to avoid.

Language Services in Survey Research. Kim Watts, Georgina McAvinchey, and Rosanna Quiroz. 31:36 July.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Marketing; Professional Development)
How do you find out what you need to know? For three in-house translators at a survey research organization, the most important translation resources often take human form.

Personalities at Work. Tim Lewis. 31:20 September.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Independent Contractors; Professional Development)
Personalities are an important part of the success of businesses. Understanding your own personality traits and those of your employees or coworkers can reduce, if not eliminate, personality conflicts and improve productivity.

Your Mission, If You Choose to Accept It. Hélène Wimmerlin. 31:35 October.
(See Agencies, Bureas, and Companies)
Translation project managers play a crucial role in the translation industry. Who are they? What makes good project managers and what is their future?

Do You Run Your Business or Does It Run You? Barton Goldsmith. 31:57 November/December.
(See Agencies, Bureaus, and Companies; Independent Contractors; Professional Development)
If you’re going to grow a functional organization, one that grows exponentially, you have to learn to hand off some of the responsibility.

Public Relations

Kevin Hendzel Sets PBS Viewers Straight: “Babelfish is 400 Years Away.” Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 31:22 February.
(See Client Education)

ATA members continue to set the record straight about machine translation.

Time for Translation Providers to Come Out of the Shadows. Chris Durban. 31:22 April.
(See Client Education; Marketing)
The intrepid monolingual buyer of translations faces a challenge that is arguably even more difficult than the one faced by a consumer seeking high-quality healthcare. The reason? Translation buyers are often simply unable to judge what is delivered.

The Professional Image of Translators and Interpreters. Rut Simcovich. 31:25 April.
(See Client Education; Marketing; Professional Development)
Do translators and interpreters have a professional image? What image do we have of ourselves? There are some indicators that we don’t have much of a professional image and that the little we have is not too good.

Translation in the News: Terrorist Attacks Spotlight Need for Qualified Linguists. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 31:16 July.
(See Client Education; Translation and Terrorism)

From the ATA Public Relations Committee: Recent articles in the press have criticized U.S. intelligence agencies for failing to develop the capacity to translate less commonly spoken languages, and have called for foreign-language education reform. At this crucial juncture, the ATA should make itself heard.

Translation and Terrorism

Translating Terrorism. Rina Ne’eman. 31:16 March.
If intelligence is the most critical link in the prevention of international terrorism, then uncompromisingly accurate translation is one of the most critical components of intelligence.

Translation in the News: Terrorist Attacks Spotlight Need for Qualified Linguists. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 31:16 July.
(See Client Education; Public Relations)

From the ATA Public Relations Committee: Recent articles in the press have criticized U.S. intelligence agencies for failing to develop the capacity to translate less commonly spoken languages, and have called for foreign-language education reform. At this crucial juncture, the ATA should make itself heard.

Cultural Awareness and the Arabic Interpreter. Aziz El-Nasser Ismail. 31:21 August.
(See Languages [Arabic])

The time has come to meet the challenges of being in the public eye and maintaining the integrity of our work under sometimes difficult conditions.

Translators/Interpreters and Computers

Translation-Mediated Communication on the Internet. Minako O’Hagan and David Ashworth. 31:36 January.
(See Localization)
Despite the instantaneous global reach of the Internet, language continues to be one of the principal obstacles to full globalization.

Translation Support Software: The Next Generation Replacement to CAT Tools. Timothy R. Hunt. 31:49 January.
A new philosophy in software development for translation technology.

Online Language Resources. Alexandra Russell-Bitting. 31:53 January.
Let’s see if a few of our favorite online dictionaries can handle a question.

Multilingual Desktop Publishing. Nancy A. Locke. 31:19 March.
(See Client Education; Localization)
The more translators and multilingual desktop publishing specialists know about each other’s work, the better we can work together.

Teaching Information Technology in Translator-Training Programs in Hong Kong. Defeng Li. 31:29 March.
(See Languages [Chinese]; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)
How should information technology be taught in an undergraduate translator-training program in Hong Kong?

Rage Against the Machine Translation. Tony Beckwith. 31:29 May.
Literally traductions?

Ms. e-Etiquette on E-mail Manners. Nur Reinhart. 31:41 May.
A much-needed compendium of manners for the translation industry in the new electronic age.

Internet Resources for the Translation of Patents into English. Steve Vlasta Vitek. 31:41 July.
(See Languages [French, German, Japanese]; Patents)
An introduction to some of the most important sites for the translation of patents from Japanese, German, French, and other languages.

Adventures in Online Learning: Introduction to Medical Interpreting. Holly Mikkelson. 31:31 September.
(See Interpreting; Medical; Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy)

An existing course, Introduction to Medical Interpreting, was converted to an online environment. Students participated in nine weeks of online work, consisting of readings from websites, vocabulary-building exercises, and a threaded e-mail discussion. Then they journeyed to Monterey for a one-week intensive workshop in medical interpreting.

Increasing Web Visibility for the Chinese Market. Mike Adams and Sheh Lio. 31:42 September.
(See Languages [Chinese]; Localization; Marketing)
If you want your company, products, or services to be seen by Internet-savvy Chinese consumers, it’s essential that your site appear on Chinese-language search engines. Make it well worth their click, and you’ll be richly rewarded on a global scale!

A Brief Introduction on the Use of the Internet for Japanese Medical Translation. Yuka Tamura. 31:41 November/December.
(See Languages [Japanese])
A short introduction for beginners on how to use the Internet as a resource for those English«Japanese medical translation projects.

Translator/Interpreter Training and Pedagogy

Educating Future Leaders. Olgierda Furmanek. 31:31 February.
A new certificate in Spanish translation and interpreting at Wake Forest University offers a different approach to the role of T/I courses at the undergraduate level.

Consecutive Interpreter Training Using Cooperative Learning Approaches. Sheng-Jie Chen. 31:22 March.
(See Interpreting)
How can a consecutive interpreting course be implemented using cooperative learning approaches, and how can the results of the study be applied to facilitate similar training?

Latin American Studies Association—Resource for Translators. Phil Berryman. 31:27 March.
(See Conferences [Worldwide]; Professional Development)

Founded in 1966, LASA brings together “Latin Americanists” across disciplinary lines.

Teaching Information Technology in Translator-Training Programs in Hong Kong. Defeng Li. 31:29 March.
(See Languages [Chinese]; Translators and Computers)
How should information technology be taught in an undergraduate translator-training program in Hong Kong?

Back to Basics in Professional Preparation. Carol J. Patrie. 31:27 April.
(See Independent Contractors; Professional Development)
Working interpreters and student interpreters can benefit from awareness and development of intralingual skills within their working languages, but especially within their first language. This article describes and reviews relevant intralingual skills and cognitive processing skills.

Collaborative Translation Projects: Pedagogical Approaches in Teaching Translation. Enrica J. Ardemagni. 31:16 May.
(See Project Management)

Translator training offers various ways of helping students understand the whole process of translation. This article shows how collaborative translation projects allow students to improve their knowledge and problem-solving skills through teamwork.

Community Translators and Interpreters: Understanding the Concept and Demanding Respect. Eduardo Gonzalez. 31:21 May.
(See Interpreting)

A discussion of the efforts at the University of Nebraska at Kearney to develop an undergraduate program to train community translators/interpreters.

In Praise of the Ivory Tower. Marilyn Gaddis Rose. 31:38 June.
In the Ivory Tower of the Academy, practical training is the inner staircase of translation studies. However, in training classes the attention given to current practices must be balanced by disciplinary and research-oriented translation studies.

A Quality Assurance Model for Remote Language Mediation. David Sawyer, Frances Butler, Jean Turner, and Irene Nikolayeva Stone. 31:36 August.
(See Interpreting)

A new quality assurance model for telephone interpreters addressing the challenge of identifying, training, and testing competent bilinguals in this burgeoning sector of the telecommunications industry.

Adventures in Online Learning: Introduction to Medical Interpreting. Holly Mikkelson. 31:31 September.
(See Interpreting; Medical; Translators/Interpreters and Computers)

An existing course, Introduction to Medical Interpreting, was converted to an online environment. Students participated in nine weeks of online work, consisting of readings from websites, vocabulary-building exercises, and a threaded e-mail discussion. Then they journeyed to Monterey for a one-week intensive workshop in medical interpreting.

The Concept of Equivalence in Court Interpreting. Marina Braun. 31:33 September.
(See Interpreting; Legal)

To put restraints on translators/interpreters by demanding a “verbatim” translation is to disregard the fundamental tenets of modern language and communication theories. Instead, the goal of any translation/interpretation should be semiotic equivalence (i.e., achieving correspondence on the level of cultural units between the source language and target language).

What Can Interpreters Learn from Aristotle and Stanislavsky? Estela Herrera. 31:37 September.
(See Interpreting)
How Aristotle’s and Stanislavky’s methods can serve as valuable resources when training interpreters in the nontechnical skills which are not traditionally taught in interpretation schools.

The B.A. in Translation and Professional Writing: Looking at the Flowing Water, Not the Canoe. Christiane Melançon and Marco A. Fiola. 31:31 November/December.
(See Languages [French]; Localization)
With two unique programs in translation and professional writing and localization, the Université du Québec en Outaouais (Gatineau, Canada) is embracing change while helping language professionals prepare for the future.

Reducing the Impact of Preconceptions on Interpreter Training Through Corpus-Based Studies. Peter P. Lindquist. 31:35 November/December.
(See Interpreting)
A discussion of how corpus-based analysis may be adapted to the study of simultaneous interpreting to improve training methods by exposing areas of difficulty, patterns of linguistic and extralinguistic behavior, and coping strategies that can affect the performance quality of interpreting students.

MONTHLY COLUMNS

(Accreditation Forum)

  • Accreditation Activities in Los Angeles. Lilian Novas Van Vranken. 31:45 February.
  • Specialized Training to Prepare for the Examination. Terry Hanlen. 31:44 April.
  • Paving the way to Accreditation. Michèle F. Landis. 31:52 May.
  • New Policies to Take Effect in November 2002. Celia Bohannon. 31:57 August.
  • Grading Standards: A Glimpse Behind the Scenes. 31:57 October.
  • Goldilocks and the Three Passages. Celia Bohannon. 31:58 November/December.

(Dictionaries Reviews Compiled by Boris Silversteyn)

For complete reviews of dictionaries published in 2002, please go www.atanet.org and click on the Chronicle page option (located on the sidebar) and select Dictionary Reviews from the main menu listings.

Agriculture
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Agriculture. Authors: T. Tosheva, M. Djarova, and B. Delijska. Publisher:
    Elsevier Science B.V. (Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 0-444-50005-7. Price: $181.50. Available from: Local bookstores or online. Reviewed by: Ted Crump. 31:54 July.
Danish
  • Multilingual Vocabulary of Educational Radio and Television Terms (English, French, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Swedish). Author: Council for Cultural Co-operation. Publisher: TR-Verlagsunion/Max Hueber Verlag: München. Publication date: 1971. ISBN: 3 8058 02889. Price: DM 20. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:53 September.

Dutch

  • Multilingual Vocabulary of Educational Radio and Television Terms (English, French, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Swedish). Author: Council for Cultural Co-operation. Publisher: TR-Verlagsunion/Max Hueber Verlag: München. Publication date: 1971. ISBN: 3 8058 02889. Price: DM 20. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:53 September.
French
  • Harrap’s Shorter Dictionary English-French / French-English, 6 th Edition. ISBNs: 0 245 60660 2, 0 245 50382 X. Publisher: Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd. (7 Hopetoun Crescent, Edinburgh EH7 4AY, U.K.). Reviewed by: Françoise Herrmann. 30:68 January.

  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Export Financing and Credit Insurance English, German, French. Author: Dr. Peter Dorscheid. Publisher: Elsevier: Amsterdam. Publication date: 2001. ISBN: 04-44505-33-4. Prices: Amazon.com prices¾CD-ROM ($200.50); Hardcover ($175.50 or $148); Paperback ($250). Reviewed by: Sharlee Merner Bradley. 31:49 March.
  • Le Petit Robert CD-ROM New Edition. Software Designer: Bureau Van DIJK. Publisher: Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing France (www.vivendi-universal-interactive.fr). Release date: 2001. Price: $60. Reviewed by: Françoise Herrmann. 31:47 April.
  • TERMIUMÒ 2001 (CD-ROM). Software Designer: Public Works and Government Services, Canada (www.termium.com or 1-800-TERMIUM). ISBN: 0-660-61606-8. Price: $395 (initial purchase); $325 (update). Reviewed by: Françoise Herrmann. 31:50 April.
  • Larousse Chambers CD-ROM Advanced Dictionary of English-French/French-English. Software Designer: Havas Interactive (www.vivendi-universal-interactive.fr). Release date: 1999. Price: $20. Reviewed by: Françoise Herrmann. 31:53 April.
  • Harrap’s Unabridged French–English, English–French Dictionary (2 volumes). Publisher: Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd. Publication date: 2001. ISBNs: 0245 50434 6 (France) ; 0245 60661 0 (U.K.) ; 0245 50455 9 (France) ; 0245 60702 1 (U.K.). Price: $65. Reviewed by: Françoise Herrmann. 31:57 May.
  • Dahl’s Law Dictionary (Dictionnaire juridique Dahl française-anglais/French-English Second edition). Author: Henry Saint Dahl. Publisher: William S. Hein & Co., Buffalo, and Editions Dalloz, Paris. Publication date: 2001. ISBN: 1-57588-674-X. Reviewed by: Thomas L. West III. 31:46 June.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Butterflies and Moths (Latin, English, German, French, and Italian). Author: Murray Wrobel. Publisher: Elsevier Science, Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 0-444-50433-8. Price: $113.50. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:48 September.
  • Multilingual Vocabulary of Educational Radio and Television Terms (English, French, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Swedish). Author: Council for Cultural Co-operation. Publisher: TR-Verlagsunion/Max Hueber Verlag: München. Publication date: 1971. ISBN: 3 8058 02889. Price: DM 20. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:53 September.
  • List of Names for Countries, Capitals, and Inhabitants (English«French). Author: André Racicot. Publisher: Canadian Government Publishing, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa (Ontario) K1A 0S9. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 0-660-61328-X. Price: $18.95 (Canada). Available from: http//publications.pwgsc.gc.ca (1-800-635-7943). Review by: Sharlee Merner Bradley. 31:61 October.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Abbreviations, Acronyms, Synonyms, and Symbols used in Medicine (English, with some French, Italian, Spanish, and German references). Author: Samuel A. Tsur. Publisher: Elsevier Science, Inc. Publication date: 1999. Price: $166. ISBN: 0-444-82904. Available from: Elsevier Science, Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:63 October.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Insurance and Risk Prevention in English, French, German, Portuguese, and Spanish. Compiler: J. L. De Lucca. Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.: Amsterdam. Publication date: 1992. ISBN: 0-444-896147. Price: (Hardcover) $196; (CD-ROM) $233. Available from: In hardcover and on CD-ROM from Elsevier Science Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757; or from Elsevier Science B.V., P.O. Box 211, 1000 AE Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Reviewed by: Arlene M. Kelly. 31:62 November/December.
German
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Export Financing and Credit Insurance English, German, French. Author: Dr. Peter Dorscheid. Publisher: Elsevier: Amsterdam. Publication date: 2001. ISBN: 04-44505-33-4. Prices: Amazon.com prices¾CD-ROM ($200.50); Hardcover ($175.50 or $148); Paperback ($250). Reviewed by: Sharlee Merner Bradley. 31:49 March.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Butterflies and Moths (Latin, English, German, French, and Italian). Author: Murray Wrobel. Publisher: Elsevier Science, Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 0-444-50433-8. Price: $113.50. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:48 September.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Abbreviations, Acronyms, Synonyms, and Symbols used in Medicine (English, with some French, Italian, Spanish, and German references). Author: Samuel A. Tsur. Publisher: Elsevier Science, Inc. Publication date: 1999. Price: $166. ISBN: 0-444-82904. Available from: Elsevier Science, Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:63 October.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Insurance and Risk Prevention in English, French, German, Portuguese, and Spanish. Compiler: J. L. De Lucca. Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.: Amsterdam. Publication date: 1992. ISBN: 0-444-896147. Price: (Hardcover) $196; (CD-ROM) $233. Available from: In hardcover and on CD-ROM from Elsevier Science Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757; or from Elsevier Science B.V., P.O. Box 211, 1000 AE Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Reviewed by: Arlene M. Kelly. 31:62 November/December.
Geography
  • Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names. Author: A.D. Mills. Publisher: SBS – Special Book Services, São Paulo, Brazil. Publication date: 1998 (second edition). ISBN: 0-19-280074-4. Price: £7.99. Available from: i.b.d. or your bookseller. Review by: Sharlee Merner Bradley. 31:61 August.           
  • List of Names for Countries, Capitals, and Inhabitants (English«French). Author: André Racicot. Publisher: Canadian Government Publishing, Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ottawa (Ontario) K1A 0S9. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 0-660-61328-X. Price: $18.95 (Canada). Available from: http//publications.pwgsc.gc.ca (1-800-635-7943). Review by: Sharlee Merner Bradley. 31:61 October.         
Government
  • Translating and Interpreting in the Federal Government. Compiled by: Ted Crump. Publisher: American Translators Association. Publication date: 2001. ISBN: 0-914175-11-4. Price: ATA members $30; Nonmembers $50. Reviewed by: John F. Bukacek. 31:60 May.
Italian
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Butterflies and Moths (Latin, English, German, French, and Italian). Author: Murray Wrobel. Publisher: Elsevier Science, Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 0-444-50433-8. Price: $113.50. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:48 September.
  • Dizionario di termini cinematografici (Italian®English). Author: Vezzoli, P.  Giuseppe. Publisher: Hoepli: Milano. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 88-203-2595-0. Price: Lit. 37.000. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:53 September.
  • Dizionario dei termini tecnici e finanziari in uso nel cinema e nel settore audiovisivo (Italian®English). Authors: Alessi, Tamara; Heitmann, Monica; Ungaro, Silvia; Zitelli, Maria Ludovica. Publisher: Tecniche Nuove: Milano. Publication date: 1999. ISBN: 88-481-0239-5. Price: Lit. 90.000. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:53 September.
  • Dictionary of Cinematographic Terms (English®Italian). Author: Vedovati, Francesco. Publisher: Ente dello Spettacolo: Roma. Publication date: 1994. ISBN: 88-85095-05-4. Price: Lit.  50.000. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:53 September.
  • Multilingual Vocabulary of Educational Radio and Television Terms (English, French, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Swedish). Author: Council for Cultural Co-operation. Publisher: TR-Verlagsunion/Max Hueber Verlag: München. Publication date: 1971. ISBN: 3 8058 02889. Price: DM 20. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:53 September.
  • Dictionary of Terms for the Cinema (Italian«English). Author: Alvey, Glenn Jr. Publisher: Casa Editrice Mediterranea: Roma. Publication date: 1952. Price: DM 12.95. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:53 September.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Abbreviations, Acronyms, Synonyms, and Symbols used in Medicine (English, with some French, Italian, Spanish, and German references). Author: Samuel A. Tsur. Publisher: Elsevier Science, Inc. Publication date: 1999. Price: $166. ISBN: 0-444-82904. Available from: Elsevier Science, Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:63 October.
Latin
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Butterflies and Moths (Latin, English, German, French, and Italian). Author: Murray Wrobel. Publisher: Elsevier Science, Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 0-444-50433-8. Price: $113.50. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:48 September.
Legal
  • Elsevier’s Legal Dictionary. Authors: D.C. van Hoof, D. Verbruggen and C.H. Stoll. Publisher: Elsevier. Publication date: 2001. Price: $215.50. ISBN: 0-444-81785-9. Reviewed by: Thomas L. West III. 31:55 July.
  • Bieber’s Dictionary of Legal Abbreviations. Author: Mary Miles Prince. Publisher: William S. Hein & Co., Inc. Publication date: 1993. ISBN: 0-89941-847-3. Price: $45. Reviewed by: Thomas L. West III. 31:56. July.
  • Bieber’s Dictionary of Legal Abbreviations Reversed. Author: Igor I. Kavass. Publisher: William S. Hein & Co., Inc. Publication date: 1994. ISBN: 0-89941-874-0. Reviewed by: Thomas L. West III. 31:56 July.  
  • Dahl’s Law Dictionary (Dictionnaire juridique Dahl française-anglais/French-English Second edition). Author: Henry Saint Dahl. Publisher: William S. Hein & Co., Buffalo, and Editions Dalloz, Paris. Publication date: 2001. ISBN: 1-57588-674-X. Reviewed by: Thomas L. West III. 31:46 June.
  • Legal Dictionary for Businessmen (6th edition). Author: M.A. Baskakova. Publisher: Finances and Statistics, Moscow. Publication date: 1994. Price: $24. ISBN: 5-279-01288-2. Available from: Eastview Publications. Reviewed by: Roy Cochrun. 31:58 August.

Literary

  • Literary Translation. A Practical Guide. Author: Clifford E. Landers. Publisher: Multilingual Matters, UTP, 22550 Military Road, Tonawanda, NY 14150. Publication date: 2001. ISBN: 1-85359-519-5. Price: $19.95 paperback; $59.95 hardcover. Reviewed by: Marilyn Gaddis Rose. 31:45 June.
Miscellaneous
  • The Writer’s Digest Flip Dictionary. Author: Barbara Ann Kipfer. Publication Date: 2000 (first edition). ISBN: 0-89879-976-6. Price: $24.99 (Can. $38.99), hardcover. Reviewed by: Boris Silversteyn. 31:54 January.
  • The Roget’s Thesaurus of Phrases. Author: Barbara Ann Kipfer. Publisher: Writer’s Digest Books, an imprint of F&W Publications, Inc. Publication Date: 2001 (first edition). ISBN: 0-89879-999-6. Price: $22.99. Available from: Local bookstores or directly through the publisher at (800) 221-5831. Reviewed by: Boris Silversteyn. 31:55 January.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Eponyms. Author: R.A. Letuse La O. Publisher: Elsevier Science, Inc. Publication date: 2001. ISBN: 0-444-50522-9. Price: $135.50. Available from: (In the U.S./Canada) Elsevier Science, Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757. Reviewed by: John Bukacek. 31:48 September.
  • The Languages of the World (Third Edition). Author: Kenneth Katzner. Publisher: Routledge: London and New York. Publication date: 2002. ISBN: 0-415-25003-X (hardcover); 0-415-25004-8 (paperback). Price: $22.95 (paperback); $65 (hardcover). Available from: Your local bookseller, or Routledge, 29 West 35th Street, New York, NY 10001. Reviewed by: Boris Silversteyn. 31:63 November/December.
Portuguese
  • Medical Dictionary: English-Spanish-Portuguese. Authors: Dr. Irmgard Nolte-Schlegel and Dr. Joan José González Soler. Translator: Dr. Peter Reuter. Publisher: Springer-Verlag. Publication date: 2001. Price: $24.95 (new). ISBN: 3-540-41469-X. Reviewed by: Arlene M. Kelly. 31:61 May.
  • Vocabulario para Direito Societário (Portuguese®English). Author: Danilo Nogeuira. Publisher: SBS – Special Book Services, São Paulo, Brazil. Publication date: 2000. 31: 59 August.
  • Vocabulario para Balanços e Relatórios Anuais (Portuguese®English). Author: Danilo Nogeuira. Publisher: SBS – Special Book Services, São Paulo, Brazil. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 8587343173. Reviewed by: Marian S. Greenfield. 31:59 August. 
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Insurance and Risk Prevention in English, French, German, Portuguese, and Spanish. Compiler: J. L. De Lucca. Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.: Amsterdam. Publication date: 1992. ISBN: 0-444-896147. Price: (Hardcover) $196; (CD-ROM) $233. Available from: In hardcover and on CD-ROM from Elsevier Science Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757; or from Elsevier Science B.V., P.O. Box 211, 1000 AE Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Reviewed by: Arlene M. Kelly. 31:62 November/December.
Russian
  • Legal Dictionary for Businessmen (6th edition). Author: M.A. Baskakova. Publisher: Finances and Statistics, Moscow. Publication date: 1994. Price: $24. ISBN: 5-279-01288-2. Available from: Eastview Publications. Reviewed by: Roy Cochrun. 31:58 August.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Geoenvironment and Natural Disasters (Russian®English, English®Russian). Authors: R.G.Dzhamalov and Yu.V.Safronov. Publisher: Elsevier Science B.V.: Amsterdam, Lausanne, New York, Shannon, Tokyo. Publication date: 1998. ISBN: 0-444-82906-7. Price: $147. Available from: Elsevier Science Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Garden, New York, NY 10160-0757 (www.elsevier.com). Reviewed by: Dr. Vadim Khazin. 31: 57 September.

Science

  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Invertebrates (Excluding Insects). Authors: Dr. Ilja Okáli, Dr. Miroslava Dulová, and Ing. Pavel MokráÀ. Publisher: Elsevier Science B.V. (Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Publication Date: 2000 (first edition). ISBN: 0-444-50535-0. Price: $170/NLG 325/Euro 147.48. Available from: Elsevier’s Amsterdam or New York offices (www.elsevier.com). Reviewed by: Marie-France Schreiber. 31:50 February.

  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Entomology. Author: Murray Wrobel. Publisher: Elsevier Science B.V. (Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Publication Date: 2001 (first edition). ISBN: 0-444-50392-7. Price: $148/NLG 300/Euro 136.13. Available from: Elsevier’s Amsterdam or New York offices (www.elsevier.com). Reviewed by: Marie-France Schreiber. 31:51 February. 
Spanish
  • Diccionario Collazo inglés-español de informática, computación y otras materias (DIC). Author: Javier L. Collazo. Publisher: McGraw-Hill Interamericana Editores, S.A. de C.V., Mexico. Publication Date: 2001. ISBN: 970-10-3428-7 for both volumes. Reviewed by: Rudy Heller. 31:47 February.
  • English®Spanish, Waste Management and Environmental Glossary. Author: M. Eta Trabing. Publisher: Unknown. Publication date: 1996. ISBN: 0-88431-477-4. Price: $40. Available from: IBD, Ltd. Reviewed by: M. Gabriela Nanni. 31:50 March.
  • Catálogo de Expresiones Para la Traducción Inversa Español-Inglés. Authors: José Merino and Susan Taylor. Publisher: Anglo-Didáctica Publishing: Madrid. Publication date: 2001, revised (seventh) edition. ISBN: 84-86623-88-X. Price: $28 (clearance price from i.b.d.). Reviewed by: Sharlee Merner Bradley. 31:48 March.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Marine Pollution (Diccionario de contaminación del mar English-Spanish). Author: Louis-Jacques Zilberberg. Publisher: Elsevier Science B.V.: Amsterdam. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 0-444-50467-2. Price: $136. Available from: Elsevier or by special order only through i.b.d. Ltd. Reviewed by: M. Eta Trabing. 31:55 April.
  • Medical Dictionary: English-Spanish-Portuguese. Authors: Dr. Irmgard Nolte-Schlegel and Dr. Joan José González Soler. Translator: Dr. Peter Reuter. Publisher: Springer-Verlag. Publication date: 2001. Price: $24.95 (new). ISBN: 3-540-41469-X. Reviewed by: Arlene M. Kelly. 31:61 May.
  • Multilingual Vocabulary of Educational Radio and Television Terms (English, French, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Swedish). Author: Council for Cultural Co-operation. Publisher: TR-Verlagsunion/Max Hueber Verlag: München. Publication date: 1971. ISBN: 3 8058 02889. Price: DM 20. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:53 September.
  • Spanish Words & English Meanings: A New Concept Dictionary. Authors: José Merino and Susan Taylor. Publisher: Editorial Anglo-Didáctica, Calle Santiago de Compostela, 16, 28034 Madrid, Spain. Publication date: 2000. ISBN: 84-86623-85-5. Review by: Sharlee Merner Bradley. 31:62 October.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Abbreviations, Acronyms, Synonyms, and Symbols used in Medicine (English, with some French, Italian, Spanish, and German references). Author: Samuel A. Tsur. Publisher: Elsevier Science, Inc. Publication date: 1999. Price: $166. ISBN: 0-444-82904. Available from: Elsevier Science, Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:63 October.
  • Elsevier’s Dictionary of Insurance and Risk Prevention in English, French, German, Portuguese, and Spanish. Compiler: J. L. De Lucca. Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.: Amsterdam. Publication date: 1992. ISBN: 0-444-896147. Price: (Hardcover) $196; (CD-ROM) $233. Available from: In hardcover and on CD-ROM from Elsevier Science Inc., P.O. Box 945, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10160-0757; or from Elsevier Science B.V., P.O. Box 211, 1000 AE Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Reviewed by: Arlene M. Kelly. 31:62 November/December.

Swedish

  • Multilingual Vocabulary of Educational Radio and Television Terms (English, French, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Swedish). Author: Council for Cultural Co-operation. Publisher: TR-Verlagsunion/Max Hueber Verlag: München. Publication date: 1971. ISBN: 3 8058 02889. Price: DM 20. Reviewed by: Jacopo Madaro. 31:53 September.
(Humor and Translation by Mark Herman
  • Hobson-Jobson. 31:58 January.
  • On Untranslatability. 31:54 February.
  • And What Have You Translated of Significance Lately. 31:53 March.
  • When the Original is a Translation. 31:59 April.
  • When the Word is Incorrect in the Original. 31:65 May.
  • Bureaucratic Babble. 31:50 June.
  • So Sorry. 31:60 July.
  • How’s That Again? 31:64 August.
  • Laugh Until You Cry. 31:60 September.
  • In Praise of Censorship. 31:71 October.
  • Bread on the Water. 31:67 November/December.
(International Certification Study ByJiri Stejskal)
  • Canadian Ordre des traducteurs, terminologues et interprètes agréés du Québec (OTTIAQ). 31:18 January.
  • Finland and Sweden. 31:14 February.
  • Canada Revisited. 31:10 March.
  • Austria. 31:14 April.
  • U.K. and Ireland. 31:12 May.
  • Argentina. 31:3 June.
  • Norway. 31:13 July.
  • Denmark. 31:17 August.
  • Japan. 31:17 September.
  • Spain and Portugal. 31:20 October.
  • Ukraine. 31:12 November/December.

(Letters to the Editor)

  • Multilingual Desktop Publishing. Yoni (John) Kinory. 31:10 May.
  • Reply to Mr. Kinory. Nancy A. Locke. 31:10 May.
  • NSA/CSS Responds to Terrorism. Renee M. Meyer. 31:9 June.
  • Insider’s Point of View: A Response to “Translating Terrorism” by Rina Ne’eman. E.S. Morgan. 31:10 June.
  • Machine Translation Misunderstood. Shannon Clark. 31:11 June.
  • Kevin Hendzel Responds to Machine Translation. Kevin Hendzel. 31:11 June.
  • A Linguistic Subplot. Kim Braithwaite. 31:22 June.
  • Is there a Place for Pedagogy in the Ivory Tower? A Response to Marilyn Gaddis Rose. Brian James Baer. 31:14 August.
  • Linguistic Subplot? Albert A. Feldmann. 31:15 August.
  • MIIS Graduate School of Translation and Interpretation Professional Exams (Response to Joel Stern). Mike Gillen. 31:11 September.
  • Gone With the Wind. Cristina Hendrix. 31:11 September.

(The Onionskin by Chris Durban)

  • Promoting Good Professional Practices. 31:46 March.
  • Translation Software Erupts at French Volcano Park. 31:45 April.
  • Botched Bilingual Label a Formula for Recall. 31:55 May.
  • Today’s Special: Menu Medley. 31:43 June.
  • The Emperor’s New Signs. 31:52 July.
  • Linguists Face Buoyant Job Market in U.S. 31:47 September.
  • Thebigquestion: Price Pressures Spark Debate in the U.K. 31:59 October.
  • Terminal Twist to Medication? 31:60 November/December.

 (The Translation Inquirer by John Decker)

  • 31:56 January.
  • 31:52 February.
  • 31:51 March.
  • 31:57 April.
  • 31:63 May.
  • 31:48 June.
  • 31:58 July.
  • 31:62 August.
  • 31:58 September.
  • 31:69 October.
  • 31:65 November/December.
MISCELLANEOUS/ASSOCIATION-RELATED NEWS

(ATA Annual Business Meeting Minutes)
November 2, 2001 at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles. 31:10 October.

(ATA Honors and Awards)

Nomination Announcements 2002: AFTI Scholarship in Scientific and Technical Translation or Interpretation; Lewis Galantière Award; Alexander Gode Medal; Student Translation Award. 31:16 January.

Award Recipients: Gode Medal (Chris Durban); Ungar German Translation Award (John Felstiner); Student Translation Award (Aaron Crippen). 31:12 February.

Nomination Announcements 2003: Lewis Galantière Award; Ungar German Translation Award; Alexander Gode Medal; Student Translation Award. 31:10 November/December.

Award Recipients 2002: Alexander Gode Medal (Susana Greiss); Lewis Galantière Award (Willard Wood). 31:11 November/December.

(ATA Chapter Profiles)
A New ATA Affiliate: The Upper Midwest Translators and Interpreters Association. Laurence H. Bogoslaw and Deb Kramasz. 31:20 April.

ATA’s newest affiliate group has the combined mission of promoting the quality, professionalism, and prestige of the translating and interpreting industry in the upper Midwest region, and of providing networking, training, and development opportunities for local language professionals.

(ATA Division Reports)

Chinese
The Chinese Language Division in Los Angeles. Yuanxi Ma. 31:27 February.
Read about the Chinese Language Division’s plans for the coming year.

French
French Language Division Annual Meeting Summary. Michèle Hansen. 31:21 February.
The FLD celebrates continued growth and the hard work of its members.

German
German Language Division Report from the Administrator. Dorothee Racette. 31:28 February.
An overview of our activities during the past year and a glimpse of what is to come.

Interpreters
The ATA Interpreters Division Update. Helen D. Cole. 31:19 February.
The success of an organization requires everyone’s participation.

Japanese
Update from the Japanese Language Division. Izumi Suzuki. 31:24 February.
Faces new and old came together to help make the JLD’s activities at the conference a success.

Nordic
Minutes from the Annual Meeting of the ATA’s Nordic Division. Marianne Dellinger. 31:25 February.
Newsletters, exams, and Mexican food—an overview of the annual meeting of the ATA’s Nordic Division.

Portuguese
Message from the New Administrator of the Portuguese Language Division. Tereza d’Ávila Braga. 31:20 February.
The annual conference is not your only opportunity to meet and network with colleagues.

Spanish
Spanish Language Division: Up, Up, and Away! Rudy Heller. 31:23 February.
With over 2,000 members, there is no telling where 2002 might take us.

(ATA Professional Seminars)

A Translators’ Tea Party in Boston. Teresa S. Waldes. 31:28 October.
(See Professional Development)
A review of the presentations given at ATA’s recent professional development seminar, “The Business of Translating & Interpreting,” held in Boston this past August.

Another Successful ATA Professional Development Seminar. Jacki Noh. 31:15 November/December.
(See Professional Development)
A happy attendee shares her thoughts on ATA’s latest professional development seminar, September 14 in San Francisco, featuring top-notch speakers on court interpreting and legal translation.

Executive Officer Columns

 (From the President: Thomas L. West III)

(From the President-elect: Scott Brennan)

(From the Treasurer: Jiri Stejskal)

  • 2002 Budget Approved. 31:9 January.
  • Looking Back to 2001 and Onward. 31:10 July.
  • New Membership Fee Structure and Change of Fiscal Year. 31:13: August. 

(From the Executive Director: Walter Bacak, CAE)